Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Unicorn example, philosophy: the problem is about linguistic expressions for non-existent objects and principles of using these expressions. In logic it comes to the question of whether sentences containing expressions for non-existent objects are true, false, or senseless. See also Pegasus, nonexistence, reference, truth value, truth conditions, assertibility, meaning, sense, truth value gap.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data
Quine, Willard Van Orman
 
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Unicorn Example I 312
Non-existence/logical form: "(Ex) (x = Pegasus)" with Pegasus as a singular term is wrong - correct: with Pegasus as general term "= Pegasus" - but "(Ex) (x is Pegasus)" is false (because of existence).
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I 356f
Fallacy of subtraction: just because we can speak of meaning, unicorns and "aspects", it is wrong to assume that there must be some (QuineVs).
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I 424
Unicorn: object-oriented, (falsifying) thinking.
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II 137 ff
Properties as the last classes all element of the zero class - so all are the same? - Vs: Identity definition: this applies only to theories that do not let objects belong to any class. (> Unicorn).

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-03-27