Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

Search  
 
Explanation: making a statement in relation to an event, a state, a change or an action that was described before by a deviating statement. The statement will often try to involve circumstances, history, logical premises, causes and causality. See also description, statements, theories, understanding, literal truth, best explanation, causality, cause, completeness.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data
Peacocke, Christopher
 
Books on Amazon
Explanation I 71
Explanation/behavior/Peacocke: assuming, the spatial relations of a subject determine its settings - problem: then we could explain the behavior solely from the accepted beliefs of the subject without mentioning the spatial relations.
---
I 81
Tight explanation/Peacocke: E.g. someone has only the terms "there is an F", "there are two Fs", "There are three Fs" and "the Fs are numerically equivalent to the Gs". - Then operations with higher numbers are explainable with these few terms. - E.g. He actually arranges 20 pebbles and pieces of gold one to one. - Then there is no difference in his intentional actions without one which is formulated with its few terms. - Problem: such an unstructured ability would then be necessary and a priori. "Numerically equivalent"/numerical equality: can be treated as an unstructured operator of 2nd order.
---
I 133ff
Explanation/Peacocke/Nozick: must rely on the nature of the object, not on the manner of givenness. - ((S) intension: is virtually equated with appearance- "nature" with "real object".)
---
I 185
Action explanation/Peacocke: by properties of objects - explanation of thoughts: by specific markings - better: by the object itself.
---
I 192
Action explanation/Peacocke: in the case of properties no specific object is meant: E.g. "red lamp", not "John's favorite color" - demonstrative: specific object, descriptively: can also be another object.

Pea I
Chr. R. Peacocke
Sense and Content Oxford 1983


> Counter arguments against Peacocke
> Counter arguments in relation to Explanation



back to list view | > Suggest your own contribution | > Suggest a correction
 
Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-03-24