Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Fatalism: the assumption that the result of actions is fixed from the outset. This raises questions regarding the futility of considerations and the futility of decisions that would ultimately be illusory. See also determinism, indeterminism, actions, justification, ultimate justification.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data
Dummett, Michael
 
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Fatalism III 165f
Fatalism/Dummett: no influence on the future - action allegedly pointless, since it will happen either way - E.g. bullet with your name: death despite precautions, bullet without a name: not death, even if measures.
III 169
Solution: it depends on the meaning of "if": permitted: from "you will not be killed" to "if no action, then you will not be killed" - not allowed: from "if no action ..." to "your actions will not work to ensure …". - Difference "if"/"even if"- Error/(s): inferring from analytical truth to synthetic consequences -> III 170
III 169/70
Fatalism/Dummett: the conclusion from
1) "you will not be killed" to
2) "If you take no action, you will not be killed" is allowed - but in every sense of "if" in which this conclusion is valid, it is not permitted to go from
1) "If you don't take any action, you will not be killed" to
2) "Your actions will not work to prevent your death".
That would only be admissible if the truth of
1) "If you don t any action you will not be killed" with the truth of
2) "If you don t take any action, you will be killed" would be incompatible.
Solution: in the meaning of "if" in which the first step was justified they would not be incompatible. - That is the failure of the fatalism.

Du I
M. Dummett
Ursprünge der analytischen Philosophie Frankfurt 1992

Du III
M. Dummett
Wahrheit Stuttgart 1982


> Counter arguments against Dummett
> Counter arguments in relation to Fatalism



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-03-29