Lexicon of Arguments

Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 


[german]  

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 58 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Actuality Stalnaker
 
Books on Amazon
I 28
Timeliness/Stalnaker: a relation that a world has to itself and only itself. - Problem: any other world can also have it to itself. - That means timeliness is contingent. - LewisVsersatz world: (moderate modal realism) represents the real world as a special one. - Because it represents it as a "way". - StalnakerVsLewis: but specifically only from its own point of view, not from any. - Stalnaker: there is no neutral position outside of each possible world - But there is an objective one: the one from the real world.
I 31
The thesis that only the real world is actual only makes sense when "actual" means something different than the totality of all that there is. - StalnakerVs: and it does not mean that.
I 31
Way: is an abstract object, abstracted from the activity of the rationally acting.

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003

Assertibility Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
V 139
Assertibility/conditional/semantics/: assertibility instead of truth: because of probability - however assertibility is best gained through truth conditions plus sincerity condition - Adams: the other way around: truth conditions not for the entire conditional, but individually for antecedent and consequent - "plus a rule that assertibility of the indicative conditional is possible with the conditional subjective probability of the consequent given by the antecedent - Lewis pro - (>Adams conditional) - LewisVsAdams: means something different: he calls indicative conditional what Lewis calls a probability conditional - Adams: the probability of conditionals is not equal to the probability of truth - AdamsVsLewis: probability of conditionals does not obey the standard laws of probability - solution/Lewis: if we do not mention truth, probability of conditionals obeys the standard laws - then indicative conditional has no truth value and no truth conditions - i.e. Boolean connections, but no truth-functional ones (not truth functional) - ((S)> Adams conditional?). ---
V 142
Assertibility/conditional/Lewis: it should correspond the subjective probability - (Lewis pro Grice) - "the assertibility is reduced by falsehood or trivial being-true - that leads to conditional probability - from this we have to deduct the measured assertibility from the probability of the truth of the truth-functional conditional (horseshoe).

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Causal Explanation Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
V 214
Causal story/causal explanation/Lewis: not everything in a causal story is a cause - E.g. sharp curve is not a cause in itself - it causes uncontrolled turning of the steering wheel) - there are several, convergent causal chains - they can have a tree structure. - Causal chains are dense. Cause/everyday language: unclear - depending on the context. - Overall cause/Mill: Lewis Pro: is a cause. ---
V 217
Closed: everything on which an event in the (pre-)history depends is itself an event in (pre-)history - but not vice versa: a causal history needs not to be closed - explanation: Information about causal story. ---
V 230f
Causal explanation/explanation/coincidence/why-question/Lewis: both are legitimate: a) explaining random events - b) denying that we can explain why this provides one result instead of another - this is not about relative probability - the actual causal story is not different from the unactual one which would have had the other result, if it had happened - there are no properties that distinguish the actual story from the unactual one. ---
V 327
Causal counterfactual conditionals/Lewis: can belong to patterns of causal dependence or independence - we get them when we pass from language to propositions. ---
Bigelow I 320
Explanation/Hempel/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: pro: Hempel's explanations are generally correct but do not exhaust all cases. Individual case causation/individual event/Lewis: (1986e) need not be explained according to Hempel's style.
Probabilistic explanation/Bigelow/Pargetter: here applies that a cause does not necessarily increase the probability of the effect. If one assumes the opposite, one must assume that the explanation itself is the cause. This is because the explanation makes the result more likely.
BigelowVsProbabilistic Statement (see above) Instead. Approach by Lewis:

Causation/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: (1986e9 5 stages:
1. Natural laws as input for a theory of counterfactual conditionals.
---
I 321
2. Uses contrafactual conditionals to define a relation between events, namely, counterfactual dependency. 3. Uses contrafactual dependency to explain causation by two principles:
(1) Thesis: Contrafactual dependency is causation
(2) The cause of a cause is a cause.

Causation/Lewis: is transitive.
4. Lewis constructs a causal history of an event. (Tree structure, it may be that more distant causes are not connected by counterfactual dependency, i.e. another cause could have taken the place, but in fact it is the cause.
5. Definition Causal explanation/Lewis: is everything that provides information about the causal history. This can also be partial. E.g. maternal line, paternal line. E.g. Information about a temporal section of the tree: this corresponds to the explanation by Hempel.
---
I 322
Causal Explanation/BigelowVsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: our theory is similar but also has differences. See Causal Explanation/Bigelow.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Causal Explanation Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 320
Explanation/Hempel/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: pro: Hempel's explanations are generally correct but do not exhaust all cases. Individual case causation/individual event/Lewis: (1986e) need not to be explained according to Hempel's style.
Probabilistic explanation/Bigelow/Pargetter: here applies: a cause does not necessarily increase the probability of the effect. If one assumes the opposite, one must assume that the explanation itself is the cause. This is because the explanation makes the result more likely.
BigelowVsProbabilistic Explanation (see above). Instead. Approach by Lewis:

Causation/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: (1986e9) 5 stages:
1. Natural laws as input for a theory of counterfactual conditionals.
---
I 321
2. Used contrafactual conditionals to define a relation between events, namely, counterfactual dependency. 3. Used contrafactual dependency to explain causation by two principles:
(1) Thesis: Contrafactual dependency is causation
(2) the cause of a cause is a cause.
Causes/Lewis: is transitive.
4. Lewis constructs a causal history of an event. (Tree structure, it may be that more distant causes are not connected by counterfactual dependency, i.e. another cause could have taken the place, but in fact it is the cause.)
5. Definition Causal explanation/Lewis: is everything that provides information about the causal history. This can also be partial. E.g. maternal line, paternal line. E.g. information about a temporal section of the tree: this corresponds to the explanation by Hempel.
---
I 322
Causal explanation/BigelowVsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: our theory is similar to that of D. Lewis, but also has differences: (stock): Lewis: used laws to explain contrafactual conditionals.
Bigelow/Pargetter: we use degrees of accessibility for both.
Lewis: needs contrafactual conditionals to explain causation
Bigelow/Pargetter: we do not. For that, we assume forces - Lewis does not.
Transitivity: the causation: Lewis pro, BigelowVs.
Causal Explanation/BigelowVsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: because we do not recognize any transitivity, the causal history will not be traced back to the past. Otherwise, Adam and Eve are an explanation for everything. Somewhere the causal connection has to be broken.
BigelowVsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: the main difference is that for Lewis information about the causal history is sufficient for a causal explanation, but for us only information about causes and thus about forces.
Appropriateness/causal explanation/pragmatic/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: Thesis: The adequacy of an explanation must be decided pragmatically. Bigelow/Pargetter dito.
---
I 323
Why-explanation/why/Bigelow/Pargetter: Thesis: no explanation can do entirely without a why-explanation. This in turn needs a how-explanations.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Causality Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 264
Explanation/causality/Bigelow/Pargetter: Problem: because of impending circularity, we cannot explain causality by laws or contrafactual conditional or probability. Contrafactual Conditional/Explanation/Bigelow/Pargetter: Conversely, counterfactual conditionals are analyzed in terms of causality. Just as necessary.
Causation/Bigelow/Pargetter: Must be an unanalyzed basic concept. It is a structural universal. Fundamental forces play a major role.
Forces/Bigelow/Pargetter: are vectors.
---
I 265
Causality/causation/explanation/Bigelow/Pargetter: first we refute some common theories. Causation/Tradition/Bigelow/Pargetter: is often regarded as a kind of "necessary connection". Normally, this is expressed in such a way that either the cause is necessary for the effect or the effect is a necessary consequence of the cause. Then the cause is either a necessary or a sufficient condition or both.
Weaker: some authors: it is only unlikely to find a cause without effect (or vice versa). (Probabilistic theories of causation, Lewis 1979, Tooley 1987).
"Necessity Theories"/Bigelow/Pargetter: should explain on what kind of necessity they rely on.
Cause/Effect/BigelowVsTradition/BigelowVsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: thesis that a cause does not have to be a sufficient or a necessary cause for an effect, the effect could have occurred without or by another cause, or without cause at all! One cannot always assume a high probability. A cause does not always have to increase the probability of an event.
---
I 266
Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: that's what we learned from him. (HumeVsLewis). Causality/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: his conception of it has a theological background (from Descartes and Malebranche): Thesis: it could not be that God was bound by any restrictions.
Therefore, it could not be that God would be compelled to allow the effect to follow. It would always have to come out of God's free choice and be a miracle every time.
Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter. His theory simply eliminates God. Hume simply asks us to imagine that the effect could not follow from the cause.
Bigelow/Pargetter: he's right! It is not only logically possible, but also empirically possible.
Presentation/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: is for Hume the guide to the possibility. He thus swings from a theological to a psychological argument.
Cause/Bigelow/Pargetter: Causes are not sufficient conditions. They are not always necessary.
---
I 267
Solution/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: inner expectations of regularities. Cause/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: according to Hume "sufficient" cannot be considered modal. That is, that "sufficient" must not be considered realistic.
BigelowVsHume: went too far in his rejection of necessity in laws. But not far enough in his rejection of the necessity approach of causality.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Causes Mackie
 
Books on Amazon
Bigelow I 268
Ursache/Mackie/Bigelow/Pargetter: dieser kommt zu ähnlichen Ergebnissen wie Lewis, aber mit strikten Konditionalen. C: ist eine Konjunktion von Bedingungen
c: Ursache
e: Wirkung.
I 268
KoKo/Lewis: c geschieht wäre>wäre e geschieht
c geschieht nicht wäre>wäre e geschieht nicht
Mackie: strikte Konditionale:
N(C gilt und c geschieht > e geschieht)
N(C gilt und c geschieht nicht > e geschieht nicht).
Ursache/INUS/Mackie: (Mackie 1965) These: nicht hinreichender aber notwendiger Teil einer nicht notwendige aber hinreichenden Bedingung.
Ursache/Lewis/Mackie/Bigelow/Pargetter: beide gehen von einer Kette notwendiger Bedingungen aus. Sie unterscheiden sich darin, wie die Glieder der Kette verbunden sein sollen.
Lewis: durch kontrafaktische Konditionale
Mackie: durch strikte Konditionale. Deren Antezedenten können so komplex sein, dass wir sie in der Praxis nicht angeben können.

Backup-System/Bigelow/Pargetter: (s.o.) würde dazu führen, dass ein kontrafaktisches Konditional fehlschlägt. Dennoch verbucht Lewis die Ursache als Ursache, weil sie zur Kette beiträgt.
Mackie: dito, weil die abweichende Ursache Teil einer hinreichenden Bedingung ist.

BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsMackie: beider Theorien haben Nachteile.


Macki I
J. L. Mackie
Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong 1977


Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Causes Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 267
Cause/Bigelow/Pargetter: Thesis: a cause is neither sufficient nor necessary for an effect. Reason: there is a backup system that could have produced the same effect.
---
I 268
If the updated system failed. E.g. you could have also eaten another slice of bread. Different food intake can have exactly the same effect. Blur/Imperfection/Bigelow/Pargetter: it is a characteristic feature of living systems. Nevertheless, this is not an intrinsic feature.
Cause/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: Lewis allows that a cause is not a necessary condition for the effect. Nevertheless, he explains causation by necessity. Namely, through chains of necessary conditions. (1973b, 1986d, 1979).
Cause/Mackie/Bigelow/Pargetter: he arrives at similar results like Lewis, but with strict conditionals. (> Cause/Mackie)
Cause/INUS/Mackie: (Mackie 1965) Thesis: not a sufficient but necessary part of an unnecessary but sufficient condition.
Cause/Lewis/Mackie/Bigelow/Pargetter: both come from a chain of necessary conditions. They differ in how the links of the chain are to be connected.
Lewis: through contrafactual conditioning
Mackie: through strict conditionals. Their antecedents can be so complex that we cannot specify them in practice.
Backup system/Bigelow/Pargetter: (see above) would cause a contrafactual conditional to fail. Nevertheless, Lewis records the cause as a cause because it contributes to the chain.
Mackie: dito, because the deviant cause is part of a sufficient condition.
BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsMackie: both theories have disadvantages.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Change Wittgenstein
 
Books on Amazon
Hintikka I 103
Change/object/substance/Tractatus/Wittgenstein/Hintikka: the objects are retained. - That is the substance of the world. - Changes are changes from a possible world to another. ((s) This is not about physical motion). - ((s) WittgensteinVsLewis)/LewisVsWittgenstein) - the simple objects are non-temporal. - ((s) not its configurations) - ((s)> Wittgenstein pro S4, not pro S5).

W II
L. Wittgenstein
Vorlesungen 1930-35 Frankfurt 1989

W III
L. Wittgenstein
Das Blaue Buch - Eine Philosophische Betrachtung Frankfurt 1984

W IV
L. Wittgenstein
Tractatus Logico Philosophicus Frankfurt/M 1960


Hin I
Jaakko and Merrill B. Hintikka
The Logic of Epistemology and the Epistemology of Logic Dordrecht 1989

W I
J. Hintikka/M. B. Hintikka
Untersuchungen zu Wittgenstein Frankfurt 1996
Conditional Jackson
 
Books on Amazon:
Frank C. Jackson
Lewis V 153
Conditional/Grice/Lewis: if P (A > C) is high because P (A) is low (> ex falso quodlibet), what is then the meaning of "If A, then B"? Why should one not say the strongest: that it is almost as likely as not A? JacksonVsGrice/JacksonVsLewis: we often claim things that are much weaker than we could actually claim, and this for a good reason.
I assume that your belief system is similar to mine, but not completely equal.
E.g. Suppose you know something what seems to me very unlikely today, but I would like to say something useful anyway. So I say something weaker, so you can take me at any rate at the word.
---
Lewis V 153
Definition robust/Jackson/Lewis: A is robust in relation to B, (with respect to one's subjective probability at a time) iff. the probability of A and the probability of A conditionally to B are close, and both are high,... ---
V 154
...so if one learns that B still considers A to be probable. Jackson: the weaker can then be more robust in terms of something that you think is more unlikely, but still do not want to ignore.
If it is useless to say the weaker, how useless it is then to assert the weaker and the stronger together! And yet we do it!
E.g. Lewis: "Bruce sleeps in the clothes box or elsewhere on the ground floor".
Jackson: Explanation: it has the purpose to assert the stronger and the same purpose to assert the more robust. If both are different, we assert both.
Robustness/indicative conditional/Lewis: an indicative conditional is a truth-functional conditional, which conventionally implies robustness with respect to the antecedent (conventional implicature).
Therefore the probability P (A > C) and P (A > C) must both be high.
This is the reason why the assertiveness of the indicative conditional is associated with the corresponding conditional probability.

Jack I
F. C. Jackson
From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis Oxford 2000


LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Content Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Schw I 161
Content/DavidsonVsLewis: depends on the language that we speak - LewisVsDavidson: Content is a class of possible individuals that e.g. get the desire fulfilled - Meaning/LewisVsDavidson: what the sentences of public language mean depends on the content of our expectations, wishes and beliefs. ---
Schwarz I 169
Mental Content/Content/Lewis: class of possible situations where it rains, not class of possible worlds where it rains - What kind of worlds should that be? - It would have to be somewhere it rains here and now. Possible situations are centered worlds with a designated here and now.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Conventions Bennett
 
Books on Amazon
I 155
Convention/Lewis: more than mere behavior regularity - no agreement necessary - not even implied agreement - 170 conventional meaning is more than the usual meaning, because it contains common knowledge about a regularity
I 167f
Convention/Lewis: mutual knowledge - Cargile: useful only up to fourth reflection - Lewis: only actions are coordinated - BennettVsLewis: do not imparting any action on a meaning
I 189
Searle: no "conventional meaning" instead: rules that apply for an expression
I 191
Convention/Meaning/Bennett: a speaker can only ever give an expression a conventional meaning if it already has a meaning - (>Lemon example) - Wittgenstein: I cannot say "hot" while I mean "cold" - SearleVsWittgenstein: the meaning exceeds the intention, it is sometimes also a matter of convention - Bennett: conventional meaning effective circumstance
Jonathan Bennett
I Bennett Die Strategie des Bedeutungs-Nominalismus aus Meggle (Hrsg) Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, Frankf/M 1979
Conventions Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Meg I 464
Convention/Lewis/Walker: is present only when alternatives are also conventions - something is only not a c if the parties cannot imagine that other kinds of speech are possible - Convention/Walker: in individual cases you cannot figure out whether the context between antecedent and consequent is secured conventionally or conversationally. ---
Lewis II 222
Convention/Lewis: not just assignment of meaning, but detour over action/expectation. ---
II 222
A convention in the sense we have defined here is a regularity of conduct. (And belief). It is essential that the regularity on the part on others is a reason to behave yourself compliantly. VsLewis: Truthfulness and trust (here not in L) cannot be a convention. Which alternatives might be there to general truthfulness - untruthfulness perhaps? ((s) Background: Conventions must be contingent.)
---
II 232
LewisVs: The Convention is not the regularity of truthfulness and trust absolutely. It is in a particular language. Its alternatives are regularities in other languages. ---
II 233
Therefore a convention persists, because everyone has reason to stick to it if others do, that is the commitment. ---
Meg I 479 ff
Definition conventions/Lewis: a practice is only a convention, if it has alternatives, which in turn are conventions. Something can only be no convention, if the parties cannot imagine that other, less natural ways of speaking are possible. Walker in Grice, Meg I 479 ff

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Counterfactual Conditionals Field
 
Books on Amazon
I 220
Counterfactual Conditional/Co.Co./FieldVsCounterfactual Conditional: It is too vague for physical theories or geometric concepts. - DummettVsCounterfactual Conditionals: they cannot be "barely true". - They need (without counterfactual conditionals) ascertainable facts as truth makers. - Substantivalism/Field: can guarantee that situations where distances differ also differ in non-counterfactual aspects. - FieldVsRelationism: cannot. FieldVsCounterfactual Conditionals: no theory about counterfactually defined relations works if these relations cannot be defined non-counterfactually as well. - (This is why they cannot be "barely true"). - These counterfactual conditionals cannot be derived from counterfactual statements about points in the plane. - Therefore, we must take them as the naked truth. - That would be no problem if you only needed a few of them.
I 233
Counterfactual Conditional/Co.Co./Explanation/Lewis: nothing can counterfactually depend on the non-contigent. - E.g. counterfactually depend on which mathematical entities there are. - Nothing sensible can be said about which of our opinions would be different if the number 17 did not exist. - Since mathematics consists of necessary truths, there can be no explanation problem here. - FieldVsLewis: not all facts in mathematics are necessary - e.g. number of planets.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie II
H. Field
Truth and the Absence of Fact Oxford New York 2001

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980

Counterfactual Conditionals Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
V 5
Counterfactual Conditional/Co.Co./Lewis: variably strict conditional: if there are closer possible worlds, disregard the more distant ones. ---
V 5f
Counterfactual conditionals/Negation/Lewis: from "would" through "could" (not): with logical antecedent and negated consequent - from "could": with "would" with the same A and negated consequent. ---
V 10
Counterfactual conditionals: Analysis 0: A were>>would C is true in world i iff C is true every A-World, so that __".
Analysis 1: A were>>would C is true in world i iff C is true in the (accessible) A-world closest to i if there is one.
A were>>would C is true in the world i iff C i is true in every (accessible) A-World closest to i.
Analysis 1 1/2: A were>>would C is true in the world i iff C is true in a specific, arbitrarily selected (accessible) A-World closest to i - Analysis 3: A were>>would C is true in the world i if a (accessible) AC-World is closer to i than any A~C-world.
"Def A were>>could C is true in i iff for every (accessible) A~C-world there is an AC-world, which is at least as close to i, and if there are (accessible) A-worlds.
---
V 8
Counterfactual conditionals/Negation: here: through "could" in the rear part -"E.g.~(A were>>would C) equi A were>>could ~C-" ((s) could = not necessarily"). - That will do for Analysis 2: ... true in every next possible world ...- then Bizet/Verdi: not necessarily French and not necessarily non-French... etc. - "all true" false: not necessarily French-and-Italian...- that is ok.
---
V 14
Definition counterfactual conditionals: = variably strict conditional; i.e. if there is a closer possible world, disregard the more distant ones - (see below V 22, see above V 5). ---
V 18
Counterfactual Conditional: I use it when the antecedent is probably wrong - Counterfactual Conditionals are more like the material conditional - with true antecedent are only true if the consequent is true - Problem: the Counterfactual Conditional with true antecedent are difficult to determine - they are in fact inappropriate! - Assuming someone unknowingly expressed such: - then both are convincing: a) A, ~C, ergo ~(A were>>would C: wrong, because A but not C,
b) A, C, ergo A were>>would C.: true, because A and in fact C- Important argument: this depends on the adequacy of "because" - Lewis: I think a) is more appropriate (should be assumend to be true) - Definition centering assumption: is thus weakened: every world is self-accessible and at least so similar to itself as any other world is with it - so a) is valid, but b) is invalid -" Centering assumption: (see below V 42): if it was violated, worlds which deviate in a neglected way would count the same as the actual world).
---
V 18
Actual world/Counterfactual conditionals: if you want to distinguish the actual world in Counterfactual Conditionals, you can do that by expanding the comparative similarity of possible worlds so that they also include certain impossible worlds where not too impossible antecedents are true - Vs: but they are even worse than the impossible borderline worlds (see above). ---
V 25
Counterfactual conditionals/Axioms:.. system C1 the Counterfactual Conditional implies the implication "were A>>would B. >. A>B" (s) That is the Counterfactual Conditional is stronger than the implication - AB >.were A>>would B. - that is, from the conjunction follows the counterfactual conditional. ---
V 62
Counterfactual conditional: needs similarity between worlds to be comparable. Analysis 1/A1: (VsLewis) without similarity - counterfactual dependence/Lewis: always causal and thus consisting mostly in chronological order.
---
V 62
Counterfactual conditional: antecedent normally assumed to be wrong - with assumed true antecedent. ---
V 95/96
Counterfactual conditional: Advantage: not truth-functionally established - either both antecedent and consequent or neither applies in a possible world. ---
V 179
Counterfactual conditional: are not transitive - therefore there is no specific course of increase or decrease of probability through a causal chain. ---
V 284
Backwards/Counterfactual conditional: there is counterfactual dependence in the backward direction, but no causal dependency: false "if the effect had been different, the cause would have been something else" - ((s)> genetic fallacy?). ---
V 288
Probabilistic counterfactual conditional/Lewis: Form: if A were the case, there would be this and this chance for B.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Counterfactual Conditionals Putnam
 
Books on Amazon
III 93
Counterfactual Conditionals/Putnam: what possible situations are relevant? ---
I 187ff
Counterfactual Conditionals/PutnamVsLewis: but there are situations in which it is simply not true that B would not have happened if A had not happened. ---
II 201
E.g. B could have been caused by another cause - E.g. identical twins: it is true that both always have the same hair color - but the hair of one is not the cause of the hair of the other - Lewis cannot separate that - Counterfactual Conditionals/Mackie: depends on the knowledge level - statement which conclusions from it are allowed - Knowledge: only "the match was lit" nothing more - Counterfactual Conditionals/Sellars: has assertibility conditions, no truth conditions. Counterfactual Conditionals/Lewis: (follows Stalnaker): truth conditions for counterfactual conditionals with possible worlds and similarity metrics. - Putnam: an ontology with possible worlds is not materialistic. - PutnamVs: the similarity metrics must not be intrinsic (with mind-independent decision on relevance), otherwise the world would be like a mind itself. PutnamVsLewis: this is idealism, and that might not only be gradually true. - False: to say "It's all physical, except this similarity metrics".

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990

Counterpart Relation Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 192
Branched Time/Possible Worlds/Bigelow/Pargetter: we allow the time to be branched, i.e. to every past there are several futures. We should also allow such development to be possible within one. That is, two parts could have the same origin. Likewise, fusion and temporary joining together of parts. Problem: it is surprising that such parts would then have at least a temporal part in common.
Suppose we meet Jane from another part of the same possible world. Let us look at this:
Counterfactual conditional: if we had not met Jane, she would not have existed.
BigelowVsLewis: according to him, that must be true.
Bigelow/Pargetter: according to us, it is clearly wrong. There must therefore be at least one possible world in which Jane exists and we do not meet her. And this possible world must contain us all and Jane, although there is no connection between us.
LewisVsVs: he would then have to assume any other connection and a corresponding counterfactual conditional: "... an ancestor or descendant of us could have met an ancestor or descendant of her," etc.
BigelowVsLewis: that is still wrong in the questionable world and less plausible than the above counterfactual conditional. This shows the fallacy of the temporal theory.
BigelowVsLewis: he is in a dilemma: either he takes the world-companions-relation as a primitive basic concept or he allows modal basic concepts.
---
I 193
Counterpart Relation/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: However, Lewis still relies on a more important relation, the counter-relation: it is also not a good candidate for an unanalyzed basic concept, but nevertheless it also needs modal basic concepts. BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsCounterpart Theory/Bigelow/Pargetter: it also leads to circularity because it presupposes modal concepts. That is, it cannot justify modal logic.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

de se Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Frank I 16 ~
Definition de se/Lewis: the self-attribution of individuating properties occurs with a belief de se (of oneself) - this cannot be analyzed as a belief de dicto - but vice versa: Belief de dicto and de re can be analyzed as a belief de se - narrower sense: self-attribution of properties that locate the individual in space and time - Castaneda: indexical references are not reducible to each other - VsLewis: therefore, apart from the belief de se, we actually also need a "de te", "de nunc", "de ibi" etc. ---
Lewis IV ~ 121
Attitudes de se/Lewis: the attitudes that you irreducibly have about yourself are not propositional - but they can also be expressed by sentences - but they are not propositions - e.g. one considers oneself a fool - then you express more a property than a proposition. ---
IV 145
De se/Wish/Lewis: objects of wishes are often properties, not propositions - must not be shared by all the inhabitants of the same world - Proposition/Lewis/(s) is true or not true in a possible world - then it applies to all, not in relation to certain persons. ---
IV 145/146
De se/Lewis: certain role (localization in a certain way) in possible world e.g. being the "winner" oneself (equivalent to property) - de dicto: only wish for world with winners and losers (equivalent to proposition) - E.g. 2 gods: the two do not differ with respect to any proposition - when it comes to sitting on the highest mountain and throwing Manna they can do it or leave it.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Determinism Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Pauen V 273
Determinismus/Peter van Inwagen/Pauen: der Determinismus ist keine Implikation des Physikalismus. Das Prinzip der kausalen Geschlossenheit bezieht sich darauf, dass nur physikalische Erklärungen herangezogen werden dürfen. Damit ist nicht gesagt, dass das Verhältnis Ursache/Wirkung stets deterministisch sein muss.
Das Prinzip der physischen Determination macht keine Aussage über die Notwendigkeit bestimmter Kausalketten, sondern fordert nur, dass es zu jeder höherstufig beschreibbaren Veränderung eine physikalisch beschreibbare Veränderung gibt.
van Inwagen: der Determinismus steht also für die These, dass sich aus einer vollständigen Beschreibung und Kenntnis der Zustand der Welt zu einem beliebigen späteren Zeitpunkt ableiten lasse.
Pauen: es ist mehr als umstritten, dass der Determinismus auf unsere physische Realität zutrifft.
- - -
Lewis V 296
Determinismus/Vs weicher Determinismus/VsKompatibilismus/van InwagenVsLewis: (gegen den weichen Determinismus, den ich vorgebe, zu vertreten): Bsp Angenommen zur reductio, dass ich hätte meine Hand heben können, obwohl der Determinismus wahr wäre.
Dann folgt aus vier Prämissen, die ich nicht leugnen kann, dass ich eine falsche Konjunktion HL hätte hervorbringen können, aus einer Proposition H über einen Zeitpunkt vor meiner Geburt und eine gewisse Proposition über ein Gesetz L.
Prämisse 5: wenn ja, dann hätte ich L falsch machen können.
Prämisse 6: aber ich hätte L nicht falsch machen können. (Widerspruch).
LewisVsInwagen: 5 und 6 sind nicht beide wahr. Welche wahr ist, hängt davon ab, was Inwagen mit "hätte falsch machen können "meint. Allerdings nicht in der Alltagssprache, sondern in Inwagens künstlicher Sprache. Aber auch da kommt es nicht darauf an, was Inwagen selbst damit meint!
Worauf es ankommt ist, ob wir dem überhaupt einen Sinn geben können, der alle Prämissen ohne Zirkularität gültig macht.
Inwagen: (mündlich) dritte Bedeutung für "hätte falsch machen können": nämlich dann und nur dann, wenn der Handelnde die Dinge so hätte arrangieren können, dass sein Tun plus die ganze Wahrheit über die Vorgeschichte zusammen die Falschheit der Proposition implizieren.
Dann sagt Prämisse 6, dass ich die Dinge nicht hätte so arrangieren können, so dass ich prädeterminiert war, sie nicht so zu arrangieren.
Lewis: es ist aber gar nicht instruktiv zu sehen, dass der weiche Determinismus die so interpretierte Prämisse 6 ablehnen muss.
V 297
Falsifikation/Handlung/Willensfreiheit/Lewis: provisorische Definition: ein Ereignis falsifiziert eine Proposition, nur dann, wenn es notwendig ist, dass wenn das Ereignis geschieht, dann die Proposition falsch ist. Aber mein Akt des Steinewerfens würde nicht selbst die Proposition falsifizieren, dass das Fenster in der Wurflinie intakt bleibt. Alles was wahr ist, ist, dass mein Akt ein anderes Ereignis hervorruft, das die Proposition falsifizieren würde.
Der Akt selbst falsifiziert kein Gesetz. Er würde nur eine Konjunktion von Vorgeschichte und Gesetz falsifizieren.
Alles was wahr ist ist, dass meinem Akt ein anderer Akt vorausgeht das Wunder und dieser falsifiziert das Gesetz.
schwach: sagen wir, ich wäre in der Lage eine Proposition im schwachen Sinne falsch zu machen gdw. ich etwas tue, die Proposition falsifiziert wäre, (aber nicht notwendig durch meinen Akt und nicht notwendig durch irgendein Ereignis, das durch meinen Akt hervorgerufen wurde). (Lewis pro "Schwache These" (weicher Determinismus)).
stark: wenn die Proposition entweder durch meinen Akt selber oder durch ein Ereignis falsifiziert wird, das durch meinen Akt hervorgerufen wurde.
Inwagen/Lewis: der erste Teil seiner These steht, egal ob wir die starke oder die schwache These vertreten:
wenn ich meine Hand hätte heben können, obwohl der Determinismus wahr ist und ich sie nicht gehoben habe, dann ist es im schwachen und im starken Sinn wahr, dass ich die Konjunktion HL (Propositionen über die Vorgeschichte und die Naturgesetze) hätte falsch machen können.
Aber ich hätte die Proposition L falsch machen können im schwachen Sinn, obwohl ich sie nicht im starken sinn hätte falsch machen können.
Lewis: wenn wir den schwachen Sinn vertreten, leugne ich Prämisse 6.
Wenn wir den starken Sinn vertreten, leugne ich Prämisse 5.
Inwagen: vertritt beide Prämissen, indem er analoge Fälle erwägt.
LewisVsInwagen: ich glaube, dass die Fälle nicht analog sind: sie sind Fälle, in denen der starke und der schwache Fall gar nicht divergieren:
Prämisse 6/Inwagen: er fordert uns auf, die Vorstellung zurückzuweisen, dass ein Physiker ein Teilchen schneller als das Licht beschleunigen könnte.
LewisVsInwagen: aber das trägt nichts dazu bei, die Prämisse 6 im schwachen Sinn zu stützen,
V 298
denn die zurückgewiesene Vermutung ist, dass der Physiker ein Naturgesetz im starken Sinn falsifizieren könnte. Prämisse 5/Inwagen: hier sollen wir die Vermutung zurückweisen, dass ein Reisender eine Konjunktion von Propositionen über die Vorgeschichte und einer über seine zukünftige Reise anders falsifizieren könnte, als durch Falsifikation des nichthistorischen Teils.
LewisVsInwagen: weisen Sie die Vermutung ruhig ganz zurück, das trägt nichts dazu bei, Prämisse 5 im starken Sinn zu stützen. Was würde folgen, wenn man Konjunktion derart im starken Sinn falsifizieren könnte? Dass man den nichthistorischen Teil im starken Sinn falsifizieren könnte? Das ist es, was Prämisse 5 im starken Sinn stützen würde.
Oder würde bloß folgen, (was ich denke), dass man den nichthistorischen Teil im schwachen Sinn zurückweisen könnte? Das Bsp des Reisenden hilft hier nicht, weil eine Proposition über zukünftige Reisen sowohl im schwachen als auch im starken Sinn falsifiziert werde könnte!


Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Pau I
M. Pauen
Grundprobleme der Philosophie des Geistes Frankfurt 2001

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Endurantism Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 32
Def Endurantismus/Lewis/Schwarz: (VsPerdurantismus): These: Dinge sind zu jeder Zeit, zu der sie existieren, ganz (nicht nur zum Teil) anwesend (wie aristotelische Universalien). LewisVsEnduantismus (stattdessen: Mosaik Theorie).
Schwarz I 31
Def Perdurantismus/Lewis/Schwarz: die These, dass zeitlich ausgedehnte Dinge gewöhnlich aus zeitlichen Teilen bestehen.
Mosaik/Lewis: These: alle Wahrheiten über unsere Welt auch über die zeitliche Ausdehnung von Dingen, beruhen auf den Eigenschaften und Beziehungen zwischen raumzeitlich ausgedehnten Punkten.
EndurantismusVsLewis: da er mit Mosaik nichts am Hut hat, ist das für ihn gar kein Argument.
LewisVsEndurantismus: besseres Argument: intrinsische Veränderung: wenn normale Dinge keine zeitlichen Teile haben, sondern zu verschiedenen Zeiten existieren, können sie weder rund noch groß sein, sondern nur rund zu t. Und das sei absurd.

Schwarz I 32
Eigenschaften/einige Autoren: sicher sind nicht alle Eigenschaft relational wie „Entferntsein“ - aber könnten sie nicht immerhin zeit relational sein, wobei wir diese ständig vorhandene Abhängigkeit ignorieren? (Haslanger 1989:123f, Jackson 1994b, 142f, van Inwagen 1990a, 116). Eigenschaften/Lewis: (2004,4) wenigstens abstrakte geometrische Objekte können einfach nur rund sein, daher ist „rund“ nicht generell eine Relation zu Zeiten.
Eigenschaften/Endurantismus/Johnston: These: man sollte nicht die Eigenschaften, sondern ihre Instanziierungen zeitlich relativieren. (Johnston, 1987,§5) Bsp ich bin jetzt sitzend und war letzte Nacht schlafend.
Andere: (Haslanger, 1989): These Zeitangaben (>Zeit) sind adverbiale Modifikationen von Propositionen: Bsp ich bin auf jetzige Weise sitzend und bin auf letzte Nacht Weise schlafend.
LewisVsJohnston/LewisVsHaslanger: das macht keinen großen Unterschied. Auch diese Vertreter bestreiten, dass Formeigenschaften den Dingen direkt, einfach und selbst zukommen.
Perdurantismus/Endurantismus/Schwarz: die Debatte ist festgefahren, beide werfen sich vor, Veränderung wegzuanalysieren.
Endurantismus: Instantiierung unvereinbarer Eigenschaften hat mit Veränderung nichts zu tun.
Perdurantismus: zeitlose Instantiierung vereinbarer Eigenschaften Bsp gerade zu t1, gekrümmt zu t0, sei keine Veränderung.
Schwarz: beides entspricht nicht unseren Intuitionen. Der Veränderung wird zu viel Gewicht beigemessen.




LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Events Meixner
 
Books on Amazon
I 167 f
Event/Davidson/Meixner: from the true sentence "Hans laughed aloud" follows logically "Hans laughs" but not according to predicate logic. How can we receive a predicate logical conclusion? - Solution: We must assume that there are events as entities. ((S) for the quantification): "For at least one current event applies it is noisy and a laugh from Hans". (Ditto for the two part-state of affairs loudness and laughter). > "Adverbial analysis"? - Event/ontology/Meixner: however, it is not even decided whether they are objects or functions - Event/LewisVsDavidson: as properties they are functions - DavidsonVsLewis: as individuals they are objects.

Mei I
U. Meixner
Einführung in die Ontologie Darmstadt 2004

Excluded Middle Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 117
Conditional of the excluded middle/conditionally excluded middle/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: could be considered as an axiom: (A would be > would be b) v (a would be > would be ~ b)
Lewis: Thesis: this is not always true.
StalnakerVsLewis: (1968, 1981) defends the conditional sentence from the excluded middle against Lewis:
---
I 118
We must consider cases of the following kind: there is a temptation to say that it can be wrong to assert: "If I had gone to the movies yesterday, I would have watched The Fly."
And it can also be wrong to say:
"If I had gone to the movies yesterday, I would not have watched The Fly."
((s) Do not omit the front link for the second time!)
Bigelow/Pargetter: we might rather say:
"If I had gone to the movies yesterday, I could have watched The Fly (or not)."
Logical form: (a would be > could be b) u (a would be > could be ~ b).
That is, we deny something of the form
(a would be > would be b)
And we also deny something of the form
(A would be > would be ~ b).
So we deny both sides. Therefore, it seems that we must deny the conditionally excluded middle.
Conditionally excluded middle/Pargetter: these were intuitive reasons for his rejection. Now we must also consider some of its formal consequences:
Problem: would it be accepted, the difference between "would" and "could" would collapse.
Would/could/Bigelow/Pargetter: normally it is clear that
(a would be > would be b) entails a would be > could b)
((s) "would" implies "could").
Problem/Bigelow/Pargetter: if we accept the conditional sentence of the excluded middle (conditionally excluded middle), the inverse implication is also valid!
For (a would be > could be b) is by definition ~ (a would be > would be ~ b) and this is the negation of one of the two disjuncts in the conditionally excluded middle. Then we must assert the other disjoint, thus the assumption of (a would be > could be b) implies that (a would be > would be b).
---
I 119
According to this "would have been" and "could have been" would be equivalent and we do not want that.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Free Will Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
V 291
Freedom of Will/Laws of Nature/violate Laws of Nature/Lewis: the fact that we apparently can violate the Laws of Nature depends on the assumption of an intermediate determinism. - The thesis that we sometimes willingly do what we are predetermined to do and that we might act differently in such cases, although the history and the laws of nature determine that we will not act differently. - Compatibilism: thesis that the soft determinism might be true, but there may be a physical foundation for a predetermination. - E.g. I could have raised a hand - then I would have a violated a Law of Nature - This is assumed here only for the sake of the argument of soft determinism. ---
V 292
Important argument: it does not follow, however, that there is something that is both a law of nature and broken. - For broken laws of nature are a contradiction in adjecto. ---
V 293
The assumption here serves the differentiation of two theses: weak thesis: an actually unbroken law could have been broken. - Strong: I can break laws of nature. - Important argument: if no act of mine is a law of nature breaking event, then it could not be true that I had broken a law of nature. - ((s) not "as long as ..."). ---
V 295
Freedom of will/break laws of nature/Lewis: E.g. Assuming I raised my hand 10 minutes ago, although it was predetermined that I should not raise it. - Then there was a time before that when the laws were broken. - Important argument: then the causation is the other way around. - The breaking of the laws caused the raising of the hand. - (see above "miracle"). - But the act itself is not the miracle - therefore you do not need any supernatural powers for moderate determinism. - Problem: the effect would precede the cause. - Nevertheless, right counterfactual dependence pattern. ---
V 296
InwagenVsLewis/Determinism, moderate. ---
V 297
Lewis: distinction act/event. - It is the act that causes the event of breaking laws. - The act does not falsify a law but only a conjunction of history and law.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Functionalism Chalmers
 
Books on Amazon:
David Chalmers
I 15
Functionalism/Lewis/Armstrong/Chalmers: Lewis and Armstrong tried to explain all mental concepts, not only some. ChalmersVsLewis/ChalmersVsArmstrong: both authors made the same mistake as Descartes in assimilating the psychological to the phenomenal (see ChalmersVsDescartes).
E.g. When we wonder whether somebody is having a colour experience, we are not wondering whether they are receiving environmental stimulation and processing it in a certain way. It is a conceptually coherent possibility that something could be playing the causal role without there being an associated experience.
I 15
Funktionalismus/Bewusstsein/ChalmersVsFunktionalismus/ChalmersVsArmstrong/ChalmersVsLewis/Chalmers: es gibt gar kein Mysterium darüber, ob irgendein Zustand eine kausale Role spielt, höchstens ein paar technische Erklärungsprobleme. Warum dabei eine phänomenologische QWualität des Bewusstseins im Spiel ist, ist eine vollkommen andere Frage. Funktionalismus/Chalmers: dieser leugnet, dass es hier zwei verschiedene Fragen gibt. ((s) Auch: ChalmersVsDennett).
I 231
Funktionalismus/Bewusstsein/Chalmers: zwei Varianten: Funktionalismus 2. Stufe: darunter fallen Rosenthals Ansatz von Gedanken 2. Stufe über Bewusste Erlebnisse und Lycans (1995) Ansatz über Wahrnehmungen 2. Stufe. Diese Theorien geben gute Erklärungen für Introspektion.
Funktionalismus 1. Stufe: These: es werden nur kognitive Zustände 1. Stufe gebraucht. Solche Theorien sind besser in der Erklärung von bewussten Erlebnissen. Da aber nicht alle kognitiven Zustände bewussten Erlebnissen entsprechend, braucht man für diese noch ein Unterscheidungsmerkmal.
Lösung/Chalmers: mein Kriterium dafür ist die Zugänglichkeit zu globaler Kontrolle.
I 232
Kirk: (1994): These: „direkt aktive“ Information ist es, was benötigt wird. Dretske: (1995): These: Erfahrung ist Informationen, die für ein System repräsentiert wird.
Tye: (1995): These: Information muss für Zwecke der kognitiven Verarbeitung „ausbalanciert“ werden.

Cha I
D.Chalmers
The Conscious Mind Oxford New York 1996

Cha II
D. Chalmers
Constructing the World Oxford 2014

Identity Parfit
 
Books on Amazon
Lewis IV 57
Identität/Kontinuität/Überleben/Person/Parfit: wenn es um das Überleben geht, können nicht beide Antworten (Kontinuität und Identität) richtig sein, daher müssen wir wählen. a) Identität: ist eine Relation mit einem bestimmten formalen Charakter: sie ist eins zu eins und kann nicht graduell sein.
b) Kontinuität: (und Verbundenheit) (z.B. in Bezug auf Mentales) kann eins zu vielen oder vieles zu eins sowie graduell sein.
Parfit: deswegen ist es die Kontinuität und Verbundenheit, die bei der personalen (temporalen) Identität (Überleben) relevant ist.
c) was beim Überleben wichtig ist, ist also nicht Identität! Höchstens eine Relation die soweit mit Identität zusammenfällt, dass Problemfälle nicht auftreten.
LewisVsParfit: jemand anderes könnte das Argument genauso gut in der anderen Richtung vertreten, und Identität als relevant hinstellen. Und natürlich ist die Identität das. worauf es letztlich ankommt! Daher muss man die Divergenz zwischen a) und b) beseitigt werden!
Ich stimme mit Parfit überein, dass Kontinuität und Verbundenheit ausschlaggebend ist, aber sie ist eben nicht als Alternative zur Identität zu sehen.
Grenzfall/Parfit: Problem: Grenzfälle müssen irgendwie willkürlich entschieden werden.
Identität/Kontinuität/Überleben/Person/LewisVsParfit: die Opposition zwischen Identität und Kontinuität ist falsch.
Intuitiv geht es auf jeden Fall um Identität. Und zwar um buchstäbliche!
IV 58
Def R-Relation/Identität/Kontinuität/Person/Lewis: eine bestimmte Relation und Verbundenheit unter Person Zuständen. Def I-Relation/Lewis: Frage: welche der dauerhaften Personen sind identisch mit den früheren?
IV 59
I-Relation/R-Relation/Lewis: These: die beiden sind identisch, weil sie koextensiv sind!
IV. 61
Identität/Fusion/Spaltung/Person/Zustand/Lewis: ist eins zu eins, in dem Sinn, dass ein Ding niemals identisch mit mehreren Dingen ist. Das aber gilt nicht für die I Relation und die R Relation. Viele Ihrer anderen Zustände sind Zustände der selben Person und auf diese und auch aufeinander bezogen. Aber das meint Parfit nicht, wenn er sagt, dass R Relationen eins viele sind. Parfit: meint, dass es mehrere Zustände geben kann auf die ein Zustand bezogen ist, die aber untereinander nicht bezogen sind. (Fusion und Spaltung der Person). D.h. die R Relation wäre dann nicht transitiv.
Spaltung: die vorwärtsbezogene R-Relation ist eins viele, rückwärts: viele eins, simpliciter: transitiv.
IV 65
Methusalem Bsp/Person/Identität/Lewis: (Originalstelle): Verbundenheit/mentale Zustände/Parfit: These: die Verbindung mentaler Zustände schwindet mit der Zeit.
IV 67
Person/Fusion/Parfit: Bsp wenn Sie mit jemand sehr verschiedenem fusionieren ist die Frage, wer überlebt. Aber da gibt es keine bestimmte, verborgene Antwort. Vielmehr ist das, worauf es ankommt, die R-Relation nur zu einem sehr geringen Grad vorhanden.
IV 73
ParfitVsLewis: man sollte unsere gemeinsamen Ansichten nicht mit dem common sense kreuzen. D.h. es geht um einen anderen Sinn von Überleben.
IV 74
Lewis: ich hatte geschrieben, worauf es ankommt, ist die Identität beim Überleben. Dann ist für den kurz lebenden C1 das Stadium S zu t0 tatsächlich Ir zu Zuständen in der fernen Zukunft wie z.B. S2, nämlich über den lang lebenden C2! ParfitVsLewis: "Aber ist das nicht die falsche Person?"
Lewis: tatsächlich, wenn C1 wirklich den Wunsch hat, dass er selbst (C1) überlebt, dann ist dieser Wunsch nicht erfüllt.
LewisVsParfit: aber ich glaube, er kann diesen Wunsch gar nicht haben! es gibt eine Grenze für alltagspsychologische Wünsche unter Bedingungen geteilter Zustände.
Der geteilte Zustand S denkt für beide. Jeder Gedanke, den er hat, muss geteilt werden. Er kann nicht eine Sache im Namen von C1 und eine Sache im Namen von C2 denken.
Wenn andererseits C1 und C2 alltagsverständlich etwas teilen sollen, dann muss es ein "pluraler" Wunsch sein, "Lass uns überleben".
IV 75
Person/Überleben/Identität/LewisVsParfit: Bsp bis jetzt hatten wir angenommen, dass beide vor der Spaltung wissen, dass es zur Spaltung kommen wird. Jetzt Variante: beide wissen nicht von der kommenden Spaltung.
Frage: können wie dann nicht doch perfekt den Wunsch teilen: "Lass mich überleben!"?.
Problem: dass C1 und C2 den Wunsch teilen beruht auf der falschen Präsupposition, dass sie eine Person sind. D.h. das "mich" ist eine falsche Kennzeichnung. Es kann sich nicht auf C1 in C1' Gedanken und nicht auf C2 in dessen Gedanken beziehen. Denn diese Gedanken sind ein und derselbe.
Vs: aber ihr Wunsch zu überleben ist erfüllt! Zumindest der von C2 und der von C1 ist ja nicht unterschieden. Dann kann ihr Wunsch nicht nur in dem unerfüllbaren singulären Wunsch bestehen. Sie müssen beide auch den schwachen pluralen Wunsch haben, auch wenn sie die Spaltung nicht vorher wissen.

Parf I
D. Parfit
Reasons and Persons Oxford 1986

Parf II
Derekt Parfit
On what matters Oxford 2011


LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Identity Theory Kripke
 
Books on Amazon
Frank I 32
Mental/Physical/Kripke/Frank: Teaches the diversity of the logical subjects of the physical and the psychic - I attribute the physical to a naturalistic vocabulary (syntactic structures), the mental to a mentalistic one (semantic structures). ---
Frank I 32
KripkeVsIdentity theory: will not go further than that an identity between syntactic and semantic structures would, if at all, be based on the fact that the semantic is not without the syntactic, but this does not sufficiently determine it through the syntactic - which is a variant of the supervenience thesis. ---
Frank I 114
KripkeVsIdentity theory: conceivable that a psychic event (e.g. pain) occurs without a physical event - hence the two are not identical - it is not an essential property of the sensation of pain to be a psychic event - it is rather only an accidental property. ---
Frank I 123
KripkeVsIdentity theory: it asserts a contingent identity - however, as it is necessary, we cannot speak of a deception if we try to imagine that the identity statement is false! - It could have turned out that pain is not C fiber stimulation: this is no analogy to heat/molecular motion - we pick out heat because of its contingent property that it feels a certain way - we pick out pain by the necessary property to feel like pain - KripkeVsLewis: causal role suggests the misconception that the cause of pain is contingent.

K I
S.A. Kripke
Name und Notwendigkeit Frankfurt 1981

K III
S. A. Kripke
Outline of a Theory of Truth (1975)
In
Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, R. L. Martin (Hg), Oxford/NY 1984


Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Implication Paradox Wessel
 
Books on Amazon
I 129
C.I.Lewis VsParadoxes of the implication: "strict implication": modal: instead of "from contradiction any statement": "from impossible ..." - WesselVsLewis, C.I.: circular: modal terms only from logical entailment relationship - 2.Vs: strict Implication cannot occur in provable formulas of propositional calculus as an operator. ---
I 140 ~
Paradoxes of implication: strategy: avoid contradiction as antecedent and tautology as consequent. ---
I 215
Paradoxes of implication/quantifier logic: Additional paradoxes: for individual variables x and y may no longer be used as any singular terms - otherwise from "all Earth's moons move around the earth" follows "Russell moves around the earth" - solution: Limiting the range: all individuals of the same area, for each subject must be clear: P (x) v ~ P (x) - that is, each predicate can be meant as a propositional function - Wessel: but that is all illogical.

We I
H. Wessel
Logik Berlin 1999

Impossible World Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
IV 21
Impossible world/Impo.wo./LewisVs: does not exist. - Problem: describe the impossible things in it. - 1) consistent truths about them. - 2) false contradictions about them. - a) truth about pigs that can fly and cannot. - b) contradictory falsehood that they can fly there, although it is not so that they can fly there. - Lewis: such a distinction cannot be made. - VsLewis: at best one could argue with something like "truth in fiction". - LewisVs: but that does not help. ---
V 15
Impossible world/Impo.wo./Lewis: If we cannot find a most similar possible world among the similar possible worlds - (e.g. 7 foot + e for shrinking e finds no limit) - then we can still assume impossible worlds - S be any maximum number of sentences, so that for every finite conjunction of C sentences in S wA>>wC is applicable in i - S is then a complete description of a - possible or impossible - way of how the facts could be if A was the case (seen from the position of i) - then we must postulate an impossible world where all sentences from S apply - it should be accessible from i alone (!) - it should be closer to i than every possible world - Important argument: but not closer to i than any possible world which in turn is closer than all possible A-worlds - impossible worlds here accessibility and comparable similarity are undefined. - The limiting assumption is obviously fulfilled. - The sentences in an impossible world may be incompatible. - But you cannot derive any contradiction from them - because there may be consistency subsets. - E.g. I am more than 7 feet tall - our borderline worlds will be impossible worlds where A is true, but where ..7.1 foot .. ..7.01, .. 7.001, etc. is wrong. - Important argument: this is not the same as the possible world where I am infinitesimally more than 7 feet tall: because there are such worlds, where physical quantities can take non-standard values, which ​​in turn differ infinitesimally from their natural numbers - Numbers/Measuring/Physics: e.g. physical quantities are never non-standard values. ---
V 16
That is false in any possible world where I am infinitessimally larger than 7 feet, but true in the impossible closest A worlds. - LewisVs: it is bad to assume such a thing, but it can be reduced to less problematic sets of propositions or sentences. ---
V 18
Impossible frontier worlds: here, impossible, but consistent endless combinations of possible true propositions become true. ---
V 15
Impossible world/Lewis: is assumed if infinitesimal approach does not deliver a definitely last most similar possible worlds - Vs: we should assume sets of propositions or sentences instead of impossible worlds.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Incorrigibility Sellars
 
Books on Amazon
I XVI
Incorrigibility/AustinVsLewis, CL.I.: you cannot be fooled about your own ideas. - But you can describe them incorrectly.

Sell I
W. Sellars
Der Empirismus und die Philosophie des Geistes Paderborn 1999

Individuals Meixner
 
Books on Amazon
I 56f
INDIVIDUAL/Meixner: individual-like objects: Example "the round square", but also Example Holmes, fictitious persons and their parts of the body, of which it cannot be said whether they have certain properties or not - "the man who knew that he knew nothing": not Socrates, but INDIVIDUAL (overdetermined: knowledge/ignorance).
I 52ff
INDIVIDUAL/Meixner: set of all properties (instead of individual): Point: if one element is missing, completely different set (identity of sets through identity of the elements) - therefore all properties are necessary -e.g. ((s) determined person at a particular point in time) Example Meixner: "george w.bush": President necessary (not in the case of Bush).
I 58
INDIVIDUAL/Meixner: apart from an individual, whose properties are at least partly contingent, there is an INDIVIDUAL assigned to it, which simply consists of the set of the same properties (at that point in time). Since a set loses its identity when an element changes, all properties are necessary here - MeixnerVsLewis: confuses individual with INDIVIDUAL: counterpart needs its properties, because it is individuated by the set (because it is only even singled out by it).

Mei I
U. Meixner
Einführung in die Ontologie Darmstadt 2004

Interpretation Geach
 
Books on Amazon
I 195
Interpretation / logic / GeachVsLewis / VsLangford: we do not get "any things" when we allow moves instead of truth - e.g. here: Inheritance of lawfulness requires something like "sire" or "mother animal".

Gea I
P.T. Geach
Logic Matters Oxford 1972

Materialism Chalmers
 
Books on Amazon:
David Chalmers
Stalnaker I 242
Def Typ-A-materialism/Chalmers/Stalnaker: (Chalmers 1996, 165-6) thesis: consciousness as far as it exists, logically supervenes on the physical for functionalist or eliminativistic reasons - Def type-B materialism: thesis: consciousness does not logically supervene on the physical, so there is no a priori implication from the physical to the phenomenal - yet materialism is claimed. - - -
Chalmers I XIII
Materialism/Chalmers: to account for consciousness, we have to go beyond the resources it provides.
Chalmers I 41
Def Materialismus/Physikalismus/Chalmers: die These, dass alle positiven Tatsachen über die Welt global logisch supervenieren auf physikalischen Tatsachen. (>Supervenienz/Chalmers)
I 42
Der Materialismus ist wahr wenn alle positiven Tatsachen über die Welt von den physikalischen Tatsachen beinhaltet (entailed) sind. (FN 17/Kap 2).D.h. wenn für jede logisch mögliche Welt W, die physikalisch von unserer Welt ununterscheidbar ist, alle positiven Tatsachen, die wahr von unserer Welt sind, auch wahr von Welt W sind. Das entspricht Jacksons Phy Def Physikalismus/Jackson: (Jackson 1994): Kriterium: jedes minimal physikalische Duplikat unserer aktualen Welt ist simpliciter ein Duplikat unserer Welt (FN 19/Kap 2).
I 123
Materialismus/ChalmersVsMateialismus: wenn meine Annahmen über bewusstes Erleben (phänomenales Bewusstsein) richtig sind, muss der Materialismus falsch sein: 1. Es gibt bewusste Erlebnisse in unserer Welt
2. Es gibt eine logisch mögliche Welt, die physikalisch identisch mit unserer aktualen Welt ist, in der die positiven Tatsachen über Bewusstsein in unserer Welt nicht gelten.
3. Daher sind Tatsachen über Bewusstsein zusätzliche Tatsachen, jenseits der physikalischen Tatsachen.
4. Daher ist der Materialismus falsch.
I 124
Die gleiche Schlussfolgerung kann aus der logischen Möglichkeit von Welten mit vertauschten bewussten Erlebnissen gezogen werden. Wenn Gott also die Welt erschuf hatte er, nachdem er die physikalischen Fakten sicherstellte, noch mehr zu tun, wie Kripke sagt: er musste bewirken, dass die Tatsachen über das Bewusstsein bestehen.
Das fehlschlagen dieser Art von Materialismus führt zu einer Art Dualismus.
I 139
MaterialismusVsChalmers: könnte argumentieren, dass die Unvorstellbarkeit gewisser Welten (s.o.) nur auf unsere kognitiven Beschränkungen zurückzuführen sei. Dann wäre die entsprechende Welt nicht einmal logisch möglich! (Das wäre eine mögliche Interpretation von McGinn 1989.) Analogie: man könnte vermuten, dass die Entscheidung Bsp über die Kontinuumshypothese oder ihre Negation jenseits unserer kognitiven Fähigkeiten liegt.
ChalmersVsVs: diese Analogie greift nicht im Fall unseres Verständnisses von Modalitäten (Spielarten von Notwendigkeit und Möglichkeit).
Bsp es ist auch nicht so, dass eine smartere Version der Farbenforscherin Mary besser wüsste, wie es ist, eine Farbe zu sehen.
I 144
Materialismus/Chalmers: müsste schlichtweg leugnen, dass Mary überhaupt irgendwelche Entdeckungen macht. Das ist die Strategie von Lewis (1990) und Nemirow (1990): Mary erwirbt nur eine zusätzliche Fähigkeit (zum Wiedererkennen), kein Wissen. ChalmersVsNemirow/ChalmersVsLewis: bei dieser Strategie gibt es zwar keine internen Probleme, sie ist aber unglaubwürdig.
I 145
Mary lernt sehr wohl neue Tatsachen über die Natur der Erfahrung. Sie hat den Raum epistemischer Möglichkeiten verringert. Allwissenheit/Chalmers: für ein allwissendes Wesen gibt es keine solche Verengung der Möglichkeiten.
Loar: (1990) leitet aus diesem neuen Wissen von Mary Konditionale ab: „Wenn das Sehen roter Dinge so ist, und das Sehen blauer Dinge so, dann ist das Sehen violetter Dinge wahrscheinlich so.“
DennettVsJackson: (Dennett 1991) Mary lernt überhaupt nichts. Man könnte sie nicht hinters Licht führen, z.B. indem Experimentatoren einen blauen Apfel statt eines roten hochhalten. Sie hat schon das Nötige aus den Reaktionen Anderer in ihrer Umwelt gelernt.
ChalmersVsDennett: das zeigt aber nicht, dass sie das entscheidende (phänomenale) Wissen hatte.

Cha I
D.Chalmers
The Conscious Mind Oxford New York 1996

Cha II
D. Chalmers
Constructing the World Oxford 2014


Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Meaning Fodor
 
Books on Amazon
Cresswell II 56
Meanings / Fodor / Cresswell : FodorVsPutnam : These: meanings are in the head - CresswellVsFodor : problem with the ascription:I will have to have the same representation in the head - it must have the same belief as the one he has - ( see above : meanings are not representations ) -
IV 57
meaning / Quine : not from speaker meaning , not acceptance of inferences of the speaker - the speaker meaning depends on the worldview, and thus of an intention what the words should mean - it can not distinguish between the views the speaker accepted a priori and those he accepted later -- so there are no analytic sentences- there is no epistemic criteria for “true by meaning” -
IV 117
meaning / truth / Davidson : a speaker holds a sentence to be true because of the meaning and because of his belief - so we can not conclude from utterance meaning if we do not know the beliefs of the speaker and we can not do it the other way around -
IV 121
belief ascription / attribution of meaning / Davidson theory: information about the shape of the words , which are held to be true are the decisive evidence for both attributions here - adoption of sincerity alone is not enough to detect meaning - we need information either about his belief - or about the meanings - ( (s) key Passage ) - Fodor / LeporeVsLewis : then the primacy thesis is implausible - (PT : " the conditions of intentional attribution include the conditions for belief ascription " )-

F/L
J. Fodor/E. Lepore
Holism Cambridge USA Oxford UK 1992


Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Meaning Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
II 197
Meaning/Name/Lewis: may be a function of worlds in truth value - of generic names: function from worlds to quantities. ---
II 213
Putnam: meanings not in the head - Lewis pro: mental state does not determine the meaning - meaning cannot be found out through mental state - mental state contains too little information about causation and situation. ---
II 213/14
Carrier of meaning: speech acts - not sounds or characters! -> Intentionality, to mean. ---
IV 194
Meaning/Lewis: Here’s a function that provides as output an appropriate extension for given combinations of factors provides as time, place, context, speaker, world - intension/Lewis: function that leads from indices (time, place, speaker, world) to appropriate extensions for a name, sentence, or general term - intensions are extension-determining functions - Carnap’s intension: provides truth value for sentences or things, for names and quantities, for general terms. ---
IV 200
Intension/meaning/Lewis: E.g. "Snow is white or not" differs finely in the meaning of "Grass is green or not" - because of the different intensions of the embedded sentences - (intension (see above) function of indices on extensions) - Meaning/Lewis: semantically interpreted phrase markers minus the top nodes (the structure tree) - synonymy: sameness of intension. Meaning/BenacerrafVsLewis: how can you ever "choose" meaning? - Lewis: this is a general objection Vs quantity-theoretic approaches.
---
IV 202
Definition phrase structure rules/Lewis: = semantically interpreted phrase markers - Definition meaning: a structure tree ... - we often talk about meanings as if they were symbolic expressions, although they are not - the category meaning is simply the top node - intension: is the second component of the top node. ---
Schw I 216
Meaning/object/word/Lewis: thesis: our words are merely linked to conditions to be fulfilled by a potential reference - so it may be that something fulfills them of which we did not think beforehand that it would fulfill them.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Metaphysics Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 27
Metaphysik/Wesen/wesentlich/van InwagenVsLewis/StalnakerVsLewis: Wissen über kontingente Tatsachen über die aktuelle Situation wäre prinzipiell nicht hinreichend, um alle a posteriori Notwendigkeiten zu kennen: Def starke Notwendigkeit/Chalmers: These: neben substantiellen kontingenten Wahrheiten gibt es auch substantielle modale Wahrheiten: Bsp dass Kripke essentiell ein Mensch ist, Bsp dass Schmerz essentiell identisch mit XY ist.
Pointe: Kenntnis kontingenter Tatsachen ist nicht hinreichend, um diese modalen Tatsachen zu erkennen. Wie erkennen wir sie, vielleicht können wir das nicht (van Inwagen 1998) oder nur hypothetisch durch methodologische Erwägungen (Block/Stalnaker 1999).

A posteriori Notwendigkeit/Metaphysik/Lewis/Schwarz: normale Fälle sind keine Fälle von starker Notwendigkeit. Man kann herausfinden Bsp dass Blair Premier ist oder Bsp Abendstern = Morgenstern.
LewisVsInwagen/LewisVsStalnaker: andere Fälle (die sich empirisch nicht herausfinden lassen) gibt es nicht.
LewisVsstarke Notwendigkeit: hat in seiner Modallogik keinen Platz. >LewisVsTeleskoptheorie: Welten sind nicht wie ferne Planeten, bei denen man herausfinden kann, welche es wohl gibt.


Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Modal Realism Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 165
Modaler Realismus/Bigelow/Pargetter. sollte eine Korrespondenztheorie für modale Sprache akzeptieren. Mögliche Welten/Bigelow/Pargetter: These: mögliche Welten existieren. Wir haben aber noch nichts darüber gesagt, woraus sie bestehen und was sie sind. Verschiedene Arten von Realismen werden verschiedene Arten von Möwe annehmen.
Wahrmacher/Bigelow/Pargetter: wir haben aber noch nichts darüber gesagt, wie modale Sätze wahr gemacht werden.

Realismus/ Mögliche Welten/Bigelow/Pargetter: alle Realismen werden sagen, dass es möglich ist, dass es eine Welt gibt, die die aktuale Welt als in einer bestimmten Weise seiend repräsentiert. ((s) >Stalnaker). Alle bis auf eine repräsentieren sie damit natürlich falsch.
Mögliche Welten/Bigelow/Pargetter: sind danach Repräsentationen der aktualen Welt. „Repräsentation“ ist aber nur technisch gemeint,
I 166
nicht explanatorisch. Mögliche Welten: repräsentieren dann aber auch nicht nur die aktuale Welt, sondern auch andere mögliche Welten!
modale Realismen/Bigelow/Pargetter: können wir in dieser Redeweise dann danach unterschieden, als was sie mögliche Welten auffassen.

Modaler Realismus/Mögliche Welten /Bigelow/Pargetter: drei Spielarten:
1. Buch-Theorien = maximal konsistente Mengen von Wahrmachern – „Bücher“.
2. Replika-Theorien = These: Welten sind keine Wahrheitsträger sondern Replikas ((s) D.h. Gegenstände).
Vertreter: David Lewis.
3. Eigenschafts-Theorien: = These: Welten können nicht als Bücher aufgefasst werden, sie sind eine Vielzahl von Büchern. D.h. es gibt eine Vielzahl von Mengen von Wahrmachern ((s) innerhalb einer Möwe).
Hier gibt es drei Mengen von Wahrmachern:
a) Mengen von Sätzen
b) Mengen von Propositionen
c) Mengen von Überzeugungen.
I 173
Modaler Realismus/Bigelow/Pargetter: der modale Realismus muss mögliche Welten erklären können, ohne jegliche modale Grundbegriffe zu gebrauchen. Und das ist schwerer als es zunächst aussieht. Es gibt eine These, dass dies überhaupt nicht ginge: den Modalismus.

Def Modalismus/Bigelow/Pargetter. die These, dass es nicht möglich sei, modale Begriffe nichtmodal zu definieren.
Vertreter: Lycan 1979, Plantinga 1974, 1976, 1987, van Inwagen (1984 : einige Modalitäten müssen nicht in grundlegenderen Begriffen definiert werden.
BigelowVsModalismus.
Modalismus: könnte man nach Humes Kritik des naturalistischen Fehlschlusses (avant la lettre) mit dem Slogan These „Kein Muss aus dem ist“ wiedergeben. D.h. moralisches Sollen kann nicht völlig aus außermoralischen Tatsachen logisch abgeleitet werden. Bigelow/Pargetter: daraus können wir zwei Haltungen gewinnen:
a) es gibt keine moralischen Wahrheiten, (moralischer Nihilismus) oder
b) einige moralische Wahrheiten müssen wir als undefinierte Grundgegebenheiten nehmen.

Modallogik/Bigelow/Pargetter: Probleme mit dem moralischen „Muss“ spiegeln sich im metaphysischen „Muss“.
Korrespondenztheorie: sie ist es, die die Probleme bringt, denn ohne sie wären modale Grundbegriffe kein Problem. Da wir die Korrespondenztheorie aber behalten wollen, brauchen wir einen besseren Zugang zu möglichen Welten.
I 174
mögliche Lösung: können wir nicht einfach sagen, dass einige Dinge nicht ohne modale Begriffe beschrieben werden können? Analog: Bsp Name: ein Fantasiename wie „Gough“ könnte auf etwas nichtsprachliches referieren, das kein Wahrheitsträger ist. Auf jeden Fall müssen wir ein Individuum annehmen. Damit nehmen wir auch schon Korrespondenz an. Falls wir stattdessen eine Kennzeichnung versuchten, würde diese wieder einen Namen einführen. Daher müssten wir einige Namen als undefinierte Grundbegriffe annehmen. Aber das wäre noch keine Bedrohung für die Korrespondenztheorie.
(Frage/(s): viele Grundbegriffe würden eine Korrespondenzrelation überflüssig machen, weil etwas undefiniertes, nicht gezeigt werden muss?)
Modaler Grundbegriff/Korrespondenz/Bigelow/Pargetter: analog können wir annehmen, dass modale Grundbegriffe keine Bedrohung der Korrespondenz sind: Bsp
Conchita kann Gitarre spielen
ist wahr kraft einer Korrespondenz zwischen dieser Aussage und Dingen in der Welt. Dabei wird die Eigenschaft, in der Lage zu sein, Gitarre zu spielen angenommen. (Bigelow/Pargetter pro).
modale Begriffe/Bigelow/Pargetter: ihre Bedrohung kommt nicht nur aus der Korrespondenztheorie, sondern aus ihrer Supervenienz auf nichtmodalen Eigenschaften.
I 175
(>Humesche Supervenienz/Lewis). Supervenienz/Definierbarkeit/Definition/Bigelow/Pargetter: eine Supervenienz würde die Definierbarkeit von modalen Eigenschaften in nichtmodalen Begriffen garantieren!
Problem. dazu müssten wir unendlich viele komplexe Definitionen erlauben. Das würde immerhin eine Charakterisierung von modalen Begriffen ermöglichen.
Mögliche Welten/Bigelow/Pargetter: wir werden im Folgenden also Versuche betrachten, Möwe in nichtmodalen Begriffen zu charakterisieren.
Charakterisierung/Bigelow/Pargetter/(s): weniger als eine Definition, aus vielen Einzelfällen.
;Methode/Bigelow/Pargetter: wann immer eine Theorie zu modalen Grundbegriffen führt, werden wir diese Theorie zur Seite legen. Und zwar, weil sie dann keine erklärende Rolle innerhalb der Humeschen Supervenienz spielen kann. Nicht weil die entsprechenden Möwe nicht existierten.

I 187
Modaler Realismus/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: sein extrem konkreter modaler Realismus hat den Vorteil, dass er viele Dinge erklären würde, wenn er wahr wäre. Und darüber sind sich die meisten auch einig. Warum ist der ungläubige Blick dann nicht verschwunden? Seine Theorie hat auch nichts Irrationales. VsLewis: um ihn zu widerlegen müsste man eine von zwei Strategien annehmen:
1. die Anfangs- Wahrscheinlichkeit ist 0 (statt etwas darüber)
2. auch wenn die Wahrscheinlichkeit im Verlauf wächst, wäre die Zuname infinitesimal.
Ad 1.: vo n 0 aus kann die Wahrscheinlichkeit eben nicht wachsen. Dennoch bleibt die Frage, ob es je rational ist, eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von 0 zuzuschreiben. Insbesondere nicht Lewis Theorie:
LewisVsVs: das würde zu einem Trilemma führen:
(1) die Gegner könnten erkennen, dass eine größere Intelligenz als sie länger darüber nachgedacht hat und daher die Wahrscheinlichkeit > 0 ist und dass er meint was er sagt
(2) sie könnte annehmen, dass er nicht meint was er sagt
(3) sie könnten sagen, dass es manchmal rational ist,
I 188
etwas eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von 0 zuzuschreiben, was eine ernsthafte und intelligente Instanz gesagt hat. Rationalität/Bigelow/Pargetter: von Lewis Trilemma bliebe nur (3) und damit die Frage nach der Rationalität. Rationalität sollte uns nicht zur Akzeptanz von (3) führen. Sie bleibt aber auch, wenn man Lewis’ Position nur eine sehr geringe Wahrscheinlichkeit zuschreibt.
Problem: jemand die Rationalität auf einem Gebiet abzuerkennen, zu dem man prinzipiell keinen besseren epistemischen Zugang hat als der Kritisierte.
Ad 2. (die Wahrscheinlichkeit bleibt infinitesimal): d.h. es ist egal, wieviel Belege wir beibringen.
BayesVs: das könnte nach dem Bayes-Theorem nur geschehen,
I 189
wenn die verlangte Wahrscheinlichkeit für jeden zukünftigen Beleg praktisch 1 sein müsste. Und das ist inakzeptabel.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Modal Realism Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 42
Van InwagenVsmodaler Realismus/InwagenVsLewis: „Konkretismus“. Stalnaker: „extremer modaler Realismus“.
Schwarz I 64
Modaler Realismus/Mögliche Welten/VsLewis/Schwarz: manche: Lewis’ mögliche Welten müssten Teil der Wirklichkeit sein, weil „Wirklichkeit“, „Welt“ und „Realität“ synonyme Ausdrücke für die Gesamtheit aller Dinge sind. (Plantinga 1976, 256f Lycan 1979, 290): die Idee von realen Dingen außerhalb der Welt ist einfach inkonsistent. Realität/Welt/LewisVsVs: Lewis unterscheidet zwischen Welt und Realität: „wirkliche Welt“ bezeichnet nur einen kleinen Teil aller Dinge (Realität beinhaltet Welt, Welt nur Teil der Realität). Damit lösen sich die Widersprüche auf.
Schwarz: das ist eine neutrale Formulierung des modalen Realismus. Frage: was soll die Realität raumzeitlich maximaler Gegenstände mit Modalität zu tun haben?
Modalität/van InwagenVsLewis/Schwarz: hier geht es doch darum, wie unsere Welt hätte sein können, nicht darum, wie irgendwelche von uns isolierten Dinge sind. (1885, 119,1986, 226), Plantinga 1987).
LewisVsVs: Modaloperatoren sind eben Quantoren über solche Dinge.
Van InwagenVsLewis: der Einwand geht tiefer: Bsp Angenommen, es gibt genau 183 raumzeitlich maximale Gegenstände. Das ist nicht analytisch falsch. Es kommt auch kein starrer Designator vor.
Schwarz I 65
Es könnte also wahr sein oder auch nicht. Lewis scheint zu behaupten, dass es so viele raumzeitlich maximale Gegenstände geben kann wie es Mengen gibt. VsLewis: damit ist die Gesamtheit der Welten kontingent geworden!


Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Modalities Quine
 
Books on Amazon:
Willard V. O. Quine
VII 4
Modality/Quine: limited to whole sentences. ---
VII 143
Modality/QuineVsLewis, Cl.I./QuineVsStrict Implication: the concept of strict modality is based on the analyticity.

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003

Ontology Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
IV 40
Ontology/Lewis: for me it consists in iterative quantity theory with individuals - the only unorthodox strait is my view of what individuals there are - part-whole relation: for me, it relates to individuals, not quantities - quantities/possible worlds: therefore there is no quantity in a world in the sense of being part - quantities: E.g. numbers, properties, propositions, events - even a sequence of possible individuals (all from the same world) is strictly speaking not itself (as a quantity) in this world - figures: quantities - they are not more localized in the logical space than in spacetime. They even exist from the perspective of all worlds - Properties: quantities (of individuals) - propositions: quantities - Event: quantities. ---
Schw I 232
Ontology/Lewis/(s): all attributed to the distribution of properties instead of objects: a priori reductionism of everything. ---
Schw I 233
Ontology/explanation/theory/Lewis/Schwarz/(s): Analysis/LewisVsArmstrong: looks for definitions ArmstrongVsLewis: for true-makers - "Schwarz: this is the difference between analysis and necessary implication.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Possible Worlds Castaneda
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Frank I 329 ~
possible world / Lewis: only publicly accessible physical objects, no premises, no propositional knowledge, extensional (E.g. 2 omniscient Gods) - CastanedaVsLewis: but private items and indicator phrases ("I", "here", "now") are individuable in possible worlds (intensional) - Lewis: if access to possible worlds is limited perspectively, then worse: we no longer know what we believe propositionally, because propositions would no longer be transparent as sets of possible worlds -
Frank I 357
possible world / CastanedaVsLewis: not suitable as accusative of thinking: as sets too much extended - not intensional.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999


Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Possible Worlds Field
 
Books on Amazon
I 41
Possible World/difference/differentiation/Field: E.g. we cannot postulate a possibel world which is isomorphic to ours and in which only Nixon is like Humphrey (here) and Humphrey like Nixon (here) - (throughout the whole story). ---
I 75
Possible Wordls/Lewis: (Counterfactuals, Section 4.1): 4-dimensional slices of a broader reality, like other possible world. All together the actual universe - FieldVsLewis - NominalismVsPossible World: these are abstract entities). ---
I 222
Problem of the quantities/Possible World/Field: with possible world and cross-world-congruence we could avoid the possibility operator - ´"FieldVs: we exactly wanted to avoid the ontology of the space-time regions -" Possible World/Field: are only heuristic harmless. ---
I 223
Possible World/PdQ/StalnakerVsLewis: (1976): Alternative to Lewis: Speech of possibel world should be understood as a speech about a property Q, so it is necessary that if the universe has Q, then there is x*, y*, z*, w* and u*, so that F (x*, y*, z*, w*, u*) - "Problem: How should we understand the cross-world congruence? the last incidents of x* are not bound by quantifiers during the comparison -" FieldVsStalnaker: Problem: interpretation of the expression "spatial relation". ---
II 89
Possible World/Quantities of/Field: what is relevant for sets of possible worlds as objects of states of the mind is that they form a Boolean algebra - N.B.: then the elements themselves need not be a possible world -any other kind of elements are then just as good for a psychological explanation - they could simply be everything - e.g. numbers - "numbers: but do not pretend to represent the world as it is - ((s) they are not intrinsically representative). ---
II 90
Intentionality/Possible World/FieldVsStalnaker/Field: The joke of the possible world assumption is the Boolean Algebra, the boolean relation that prevails between possibel worlds-" Problem: then the empty set of possible worlds which contains the three-part of the angle, which is a subset of the set of the possible world, in which Caesar crossed the Rubicon - "Problem: what fact does that make? - "without it the approach is meaningless.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie II
H. Field
Truth and the Absence of Fact Oxford New York 2001

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980

Possible Worlds Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
IV 147
Centered possible worlds/De re/de se/Quine/Lewis: (Ontological Relativity, Propositional Objects): E.g. a cat that is being chased by a dog wants to get onto the roof to be safe - de dicto: it wants a state that is the class of all possible worlds where it reaches the roof - Problem: cross-world identity: Question: which of the many counterparts in many possible worlds is the cat itself? - Solution/Quine: centered world: Pairs of a world and a designated time-space point in it, the desired state is then a class of centered worlds - no centered world belongs to two classes (desired and dreaded possible worlds) - QuineVs: ultimately better divided theory: here are the objects of simple settings, classes of stimulus patterns that are more complex are linguistic - Property/Lewis: corresponds to a class of centered worlds, more specifically to a property of space-time points, but also a property of cats.
---
IV 148
Possible world/Quine/Lewis: Lewis: large particulars (concrete) - Quine: abstract entities - certain classes of classes of quadruples of real numbers - (space-time points) - Stalnaker: pro Quine: corresponds better to our everyday language: What it could have been like. ---
IV 149
Situation/Possible world/Lewis: Thesis: there can also be alternatives within a possible world - thus distinction situation/Possible world - LewisVsStalnaker: not propositions as belief objects (objects of desire) but attitudes de se - E.g. Lingens with memory loss finds out in the book that there are two people who could be identical with him - a) on the 6th floor at Stanford - b) in the basement of a different library 3km away - two possible situations (possibilities) in the same possible worlds - solution: property instead proposition - the propositions apply to both people in the same way. ---
V 42
Centering assumption/Possible world/Lewis: If it was violated, worlds that differed in a non-observed way would be considered to be the same as the actual world. ---
V 262
Possible world/Equality/Identity/Lewis: it is an independent and difficult question whether two possible worlds that exactly match their history also match in all other aspects - e.g. in their probabilities, laws, modal truths, counterfctual conditionals - Lewis: this is not of interest here. Overall history/Supervenience: supervenes on the history of events, whatever else may in turn supervene on the overall history. ---
Schw I 216
Possible world/Lewis: no set of ordinary sentences - of which there are not enough in the language. Lewis: counterparts, possible worlds are real (KripkeVs) (PutnamVs).
---
I 59
Possible world/Lewis: you can speak pretty freely and metaphysically guileless and without special ontological reservations about possible worlds. ---
II 214
Possible world save separation of object/meta languange - Truth and analyticity cannot be defined in the same language. ---
II 214
Definition Possible World (VsLewis): The concept of a possible world can be explained even by recourse to semantic terms. Possible worlds are models of the analytical sentences of a language or diagrams or theories of such models. ---
II 214
LewisVs: possible worlds cannot be explained by recourse to semantic terms. Possible worlds exist and should not be replaced by their linguistic representations. 1) Such a replacement does not work properly: two worlds that are indistinguishable in the representative language are (falsely) assigned one and the same representation.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Possible Worlds Putnam
 
Books on Amazon
III 177
Possible world/PutnamVsLewis: another way needs not to be another world - otherwise a property of being a state description of the whole world would follow from the fact that the Eiffel Tower had a different height -> Properties - ((s)> Stalnaker ditto) .

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990

Possible Worlds Stalnaker
 
Books on Amazon
I 17
Possible worlds/StalnakerVsLewis: instead of actually existing worlds better ways how the world might have been.
I 14
M/Time/Stalnaker: There are many analogies between times and worlds - actualism: corresponds to presentism - Def presentism/(s): only the present exists and only the current point in time - - four-dimensionalism/Stalnaker: corresponds to modal realism - Def modal realism/(s): other worlds exist literally - Representative: David Lewis - Stalnaker: very few are realists in terms of possible world and times, but most are realists in terms of space.
I 27
M/StalnakerVsLewis: instead of something like "I and my surroundings" a way how the world is = property or state - Important argument: properties may exist uninstantiatedly.
I 38
M: is no thing of a certain kind, either - nor an individual - a possible world is that to which truth is relative - what people differentiate in their rational actions.
I 52
M: r: it is pointless to ask whether poss.w. satisfy certain conditions - E.g. Is there a possible world in which water is not H2O? This is pointless - the answer will always have the form of a necessary sentence: P-or-not-P - but doubt about that will be a doubt about the content of the sentence and not doubt about a possible world - the same goes for the problem that you might not believe a necessary truth. - ((s) because you have not understood it).
I 52
Possible worlds/Conditions: it is pointless to ask whether possible world meet certain conditions.
I 52
M/necessary/Stalnaker: ((s) > Kripke): if it is true, E.g. that water is necessarily H2O or e.g. that there are unattainable cardinal numbers, then these assertions express exactly this proposition, and the sentences that express these propositions tell us nothing about the nature of possible worlds - Stalnaker: therefore it is impossible to characterize the entire range of all the possibilities - for then we would know the way how the range of all possibilities is different from that how it could be -> Wittgenstein: you should remain silent about things that you cannot talk about - (Tractatus) - StalnakerVsWittgenstein: but that does not help, because pointing also must have a content - therefore Ramsey: ...nor whistling.
I 84/85
Possible worlds/Stalnaker: are not just an exercise of our imagination, but part of our actions - e.g. scientific explanations.

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003

Possible Worlds Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 41
Def Mögliche Welten/Lewis: früh: Weisen, wie die Dinge sein könnten. Van InwagenVs: das sind eher Eigenschaften als konkrete Universen. (StalnakerVsLewis, RichardsVsLewis: dito). Lewis: später: Welten entsprechen Weisen, wie die Dinge sein könnten.
Schwarz: aber wir müssen nicht unbedingt spezielle Entitäten dafür einführen. Sie könnten auch grammatische Illusionen sein. Selbst wenn man mögliche Welten als Entitäten betrachtet, legt man noch lange nicht fest, was das für Entitäten sind.


Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Predicates Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Schw I 121
Predicate/Lewis/Schwarz: singles out properties - which ones depends on possible worlds. ---
Schw I 228
Names/Predicate/Property/Lewis: Thesis: names can name anything: instead of predicate "F" we take "F-ness" predicates are not names and designate nothing - predicate/(s): Not singular terms. SchwarzVsLewis/RussellVsFrege: assuming that each predicate can be assigned a name for a corresponding property, Russell’s paradox follows -> heterology: no property corresponds to some predicates such as E.g. -is a property that does not apply to itself - Also, nothing that can be named with a singular term corresponds to predicates such as E.g. "is a class" E.g. -is part of- and E.g. -"identical with". - ((s) predicates can always be invented, whether the world contains adequate properties is an empirical question.) - ((s) properties belong to ontology - predicates: belong to ideology (alluding to Quine?)).

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Private Language Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
II 227
VsLewis: E.g. Assuming a person who lives isolated throughout his life could spontaneously begin to use a language one day due to his brilliant talent, e.g. to write a diary. Private Language: This would be a random private language, it would not be subject to the verdict of Wittgenstein. And here no convention would be involved.
---
II 227/28
LewisVs: Even the isolated living person adheres to a certain regularity. He also knows that he adhered to this regularity in the past and has an interest to behave equally all the time.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Properties Putnam
 
Books on Amazon
III 177
Properties/LewisVsPutnam: properties must be something simple - if one follows from another, then that would be a necessary relationship between two simple properties. - Putnam: that would be incomprehensible - wrong solution/Lewis: then properties would have to be interpreted as complexes in turn - LewisVs: properties must be simple - from what should they be composed? - PutnamVsLewis: this is not an analytical style - why should something simple not make any relations? ---
V 119
Properties/identity/Putnam: synonymy is necessary for identity of predicates, not properties - temperature is not synonymous with molecular motion. ---
I 195
Functional property/Putnam: E.g. to have a program is for a computer a functional property instead of a physical - non-functional properties: inputs and outputs - functional properties: are defined by cause and effect. ---
I 195
Reference/Lewis: is a functional property - N.B.: that should undermine the distinction physical/non-physical - Reference is then a functional property of the organism-plus-environment system.

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990

Qualia Jackson
 
Books on Amazon:
Frank C. Jackson
Pauen V 179
Colour researcher Mary/Jackson/Pauen: JacksonVsMonism! Unlike nail. E.g. Fred can see two completely different colours within the red spectrum.
E.g.: Colour researcher Mary: she learns "how it is" when she leaves her black and white space.
Thesis 1. Neurobiological knowledge is, in principle, incomplete with regard to phenomenal experiences.
2. The monism is false, phenomenal properties cannot be identical with neural properties! Phenomenal properties are causally ineffective side effects of mental states. (Epiphenomenalism).
---
V 180
Jackson: Two Different Theses 1. Epistemological Theory: according to this theory neurobiological knowledge does not imply phenomenal knowledge (like Nagel). LewisVsJackson/Pauen: Mary does not acquire new knowledge, but only the ability to imagine colors from now on. She already had the relevant knowledge beforehand.
JacksonVsLewis/Pauen: the knowledge goes beyond the ability: Mary can think about whether she has the same colour perceptions as other people.
What is decisive here is the object of the consideration: the question whether their ideas of the phenomenal states of others apply or not.
Nida Rümelin/Jackson/Pauen: (pro): the phenomenal knowledge here is a real knowledge: it allows the decision between previously open possibilities.
---
V 181
LycanVsJackson/Pauen: does not give any argument VsMonism: knowledge does not have to refer to new facts outside of physics, it can simply be a new approach. Mary knew "all the facts" before her liberation, but she had only limited access to them. This is again an epistemic, not an ontological argument. Therefore no objection to monism is to be expected.
A physical duplicate of Mary would have to have the same feelings. In any case, this is not excluded by Jackson.
---
V 182
Thus, Jackson shows only the weaker variant of the distinction between neurobiological and phenomenal knowledge: they show that the gap exists, but not that it is not unbridgeable. Missing Qualia/Pauen: For example, two otherwise physically identical organisms differ completely from one another: one has no phenomenal sensations at all.
N.B.: if this is possible, physiological knowledge can give no information about the mental states.
LenzenVs: it is not clear in what sense this case is "possible": there are probably people whose entire behavior is without consciousness, others, where they are at least aware of some activities.
Fallacy every/all/Pauen: now one can perhaps say that every single action could also be executed without consciousness, but not all actions!
---
V 183
This is not possible because many actions require learning. We could never have learned them in this way! VsVs: the representative of the missing Qualia does not have to react to Lenzen, he can easily claim that the performance is "intuitively plausible".
Thus the argument of the presupposition presupposes certain scenarios.
In any case, one cannot (should not) deduce the possibility from the conceptuality. But only one such real possibility would provide a serious objection to the VsTheory of identity.
VsMissing Qualia: mental states are degraded de facto into epiphenomena.
   1. Dualistic distinction between mental and physical properties.
---
V 184
2. It is assumed that the mental properties are not causally effective, otherwise their absence would be noticeable.

Jack I
F. C. Jackson
From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis Oxford 2000


Pau I
M. Pauen
Grundprobleme der Philosophie des Geistes Frankfurt 2001
Reference Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Horwich I 437
Elite classes/nature/natural reference/world/language/Lewis/Putnam: thesis: there are certain classes of things -out there- (elite classes) which are intrinsically different, while it is a natural condition for reference (integrated in nature) that as many of our concepts as possible should refer to these elite classes. - PutnamVs: that’s spooky. ---
Schw I 149
New theory of reference/Putnam: Reference has nothing to do with associated description - so pain might actually be joy. (Kripke ditto) - LewisVsPutnam: Solution: Role: pain cannot play the role of Joy. ---
Schw I 217
Reference/description theory of reference/Lewis: Thesis: expressions such as possible worlds, meanings, pain, objective probability are associated with roles that determine what they refer to. ---
Putnam II 195 f
Reference/Lewis: is a functional property. (See property/Put) - Important argument: to be distinguished in physical/non-physical - Reference is then a functional property of the organism-plus-environment system - then the commonality of references is just as abstract as a program, but does not require any fundamental quantities. - PutnamVsLewis: Reference is no functional property, no causality or causality is nothing physical. - (> Charles Fried)

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990
Similarity Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 228
Zugänglichkeit/Lewis: Zugänglichkeit zwischen möglichen Welten: ihre Grade sollten als Grade von Ähnlichkeit verstanden werden.
Ähnlichkeit/Mögliche Welten/Lewis: hier müssen wir die relevante Ähnlichkeit erkennen. Wichtiger ist die in Bezug auf bestimmte Gesetze! Damit werden Gesetze bei der Erklärung schon vorausgesetzt. (Lewis 1979, 1986a - JacksonVsLewis: Jackson 1977a: Kausalität statt Ähnlichkeit)
Zugänglichkeit/Bigelow/Pargetter: Bsp 3 Welten
1. Welt u: Darwin fragt seinen Vater um Erlaubnis loszusegeln, erhält sie und schreibt sein Buch, von dem wir alle gehört haben
2. Welt w: Darwin erhält die Erlaubnis nicht, segelt nicht los und schreib sein Buch nicht
3. Welt e v: Darwin erhält die Erlaubnis nicht, segelt trotzdem los… und sein Vater hat vergessen was er gesagt hat.
Zugänglichkeit/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: nach unserer Semantik (und der von Lewis) ist das entsprechende KoKo nur wahr in w, wenn Möwe wie u die von w am meisten zugänglichsten (nächste Welt ähnlichste Möwe) sind.
Lewis: also muss u w ähnlicher sein als w v ähnlich ist. u und w müssen einander näher sein.
Wenn v und w näher aneinander wären, wäre folgendes KoKo wahr:
Wenn Darwins Vater die Erlaubnis nicht gegeben hätte, dann hätte Darwin nicht gehorcht und sein Vater hätte es vergessen.
Und das ist nicht wahr in w. Also ist u w näher als v u nahe ist.
I 229
Ähnlichkeit/Mögliche Welten/Relevanz/Bigelow/Pargetter: welche Art von Ähnlichkeit ist aber die relevante? Es kann nicht um bestimmte Tatsachen (wie in dieser Geschichte) gehen. Das wäre nicht hinreichend. Lösung/Lewis:
Def Ähnlichkeit/Ähnlichkeitsmetrik/MöWe/Lewis: durch weniger Ausnahmen in einer Möwe bei Gesetzen, die in der anderen Möwe gelten. >Wunder.
Bsp Darwin: „Wunder“ wären die falsche akustische Übermittlung der Aussage des Vaters und das Vergessen durch den Vater.
Wunder/Lewis: aber auch Welt u könnte Wunder enthalten: die Vorgeschichte ist die gleiche wie in v, aber die Entscheidung des Vaters fällt anders aus, wobei aber eben die kausale Situation dieselbe wäre Und das Wunder der anderen Entscheidung wäre vielleicht genauso groß wie das der Gedächtnislöschung und der falschen Hörens.
I 230
Naturgesetze/ Welten/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: also könnte es sein, dass auch dort andere Gesetze gelten. Gehorchen/Gesetze/MöWe/Bigelow/Pargetter: wir können auch sagen, dass eine Welt in einem gewissen Grad den Gesetzen einer anderen Möwe gehorcht.
Bsp könnte es eine Möwe z geben, die den Gesetzen von w besser gehorcht als u?
z: Angenommen, hier gibt es Gesetze, die die Ablehnung der Erlaubnis wahrscheinlich machen. Angenommen, der Vater hat von einem Konflikt mit Frankreich in der Seegegend gehört. Das verlangt keine Änderung von Gesetzen.
Dann wären wir gezwungen anzunehmen, dass folgendes KoKo wahr ist in w: (nach unserer Semantik und der von Lewis):
Wenn Darwins Vater abgelehnt hätte, wäre Krieg zwischen England und Frankreich ausgebrochen oder es hätte einen anderen Faktor gegeben, der die Ablehnung herbeigeführt hätte.
Allerdings ist es falsch in w in wenigstens einer Lesart.
Ähnlichkeitsmetrik/Relevanz/Ähnlichkeit/Lewis: das zeigt, daß Ähnlichkeit der Gesetze nicht der einzige relevante Faktor ist.
Lösung/Lewis: Ähnlichkeit zwischen Welten muss erklärt werden
a) durch Ähnlichkeit in Bezug auf Gesetze,
b) durch Ähnlichkeit in Bezug auf bestimmte Tatsachen.
Gewichtung/Lewis: Bsp gleiche Tatsachen über lange Zeit haben dabei mehr Gewicht als das Gehorchen gleicher bestimmter Gesetze.
Aber die Befolgung von Gesetzen hat mehr Gewicht als bestimmte übereinstimmende Tatsachen.
I 231
LewisVsBigelow: Vsmodale Theorie. Bigelow/Pargetter: wir erklären Gesetze durch Zugänglichkeit
Lewis: erklärt Zugänglichkeit durch Gesetze.
Bigelow/Pargetter: wenn Lewis recht hat, ist unsere Theorie zirkulär.
Lösung/Lewis: s.u.
BigelowVsVs/BigelowVsLewis: wir leugnen, dass Zugänglichkeit durch Ähnlichkeit erklärt werden muss. Die am leichtesten zugängliche Welt muss nicht die ähnlichste Welt sein! Das zeigen die obigen Bsp (Darwins Vater).
Aber selbst wenn es nicht so wäre, würde es die modale Theorie der Naturgesetze nicht widerlegen.
Ähnlichkeit/MöWe/Bigelow/Pargetter: wir sind herausgefordert, eine bessere Theorie als Lewis zu konstruieren.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Similarity Metrics Logic Texts
 
Books on Amazon
Re III 104ff
Ähnlichkeitsmetrik/ÄM/Stalnaker: kleinstmögliche Revision - also die ähnlichste Welt. Auswahlfunktion: f(A,w) - »Wenn du eine Eins machst, erhältst du ein Stipendium« ist wahr, wenn die Welt, in der du ein Stipendium erhält, der Welt in der du eine Eins machst am ähnlichsten ist - MöWe-Sicht: weicht von der wafu ab, wenn das Vorderglied falsch ist -" denn alle Kombinationen können in Möwe verwirklicht sein. Re III 105 ÄM/MöWe/Bedingungssatz/Konditional/Read: einige klassische logische Prinzipien versagen hier: Bsp Kontraposition daß »wenn B, dann nicht-A« aus »wenn A, dann nicht-B« folgt - die ähnliche Welt, in der es regnet, kann sehr wohl eine sein, in welcher es nur leicht regnet. Aber die ähnlichste Welt, in der es heftig regnet, kann nicht eine sein, in der überhaupt nicht regnet - III 106 Weiteres Prinzip, das versagt: die Verstärkung des Wenn-Satzes.: »wenn A, dann B. Also, wenn A und C, dann B.« - Bsp wenn ich Zucker in meinen Tee tue, wird gut schmecken. Also wenn ich Zucker und Dieselöl in meinen Tee tue, wird er gut schmecken. In der ähnlichsten Welt in der ich Dieselöl wie Zucker in meinen Tee tue, schmeckt er scheußlich - weiter: die Ergebnisse des Konditionalitätsprinzip sind ungültig: - Wenn A, dann B. Also, wenn A und C, dann B - und Wenn A, dann B. Wenn B, dann C. Also, wenn A, dann C - Grund: der Bedingungssatz ist zu einer modalen Verknüpfung geworden ist. - wir müssen wissen, daß diese Aussagen in irgend einem angemessenen modalen Sinn stark genug sind - um sicherzustellen, daß die ähnlichste »A und C«-Welt die ähnlichste A-Welt ist, müssen wir wissen, daß C überall wahr ist -
III 108 ÄM/das bedingt ausgeschlossene Dritte/Read: bSaD: das eine oder andere Glied eines Paars von Bedingungssätzen muß wahr sein - entspricht der Annahme, daß es immer eine einzige ähnlichste Welt gibt - (Stalnaker pro) - LewisVsStalnaker: Bsp Bizet/Verdi - alle Kombinationen sind falsch - Stalnaker: statt einziger ähnlichster mindestens eine ähnlichste -" LewisVs: Menge der Möwe in der Lewis 2 m + e groß ist, wobei e in geeigneter Weise abnimmt, hat keine Grenze - Lösung/Lewis: statt Auswahlfunktion: Ähnlichkeitsrelation: er schlägt vor, daß »wenn A, dann B« dann in w wahr ist, wenn es entweder keine »A oder nicht-B«-Welt gibt, oder irgendeine »A und B«-Welt die ähnlicher ist als jede »A und nicht-B«-Welt -" Re III 110 Verdi-Bsp wo es keine einzigartige ähnlichste Welt gibt, sind die »würde«-Bedingungssätze falsch, weil es für jede der passenden ähnlichsten Welten, in denen sie Landsleute sind, keine ähnlichste Welt gibt in der Bizet eine andere Nationalität hat - Bsp ... wenn du eine Eins machst bekommst du ein Stipendium: wird wahr sein, wenn es für jede Welt, in der du eine Eins machst, und kein Stipendium erhältst, eine ähnlichere Welt gibt, die in der du beides erhältst - (ohne bedingten SaD).
Re III 115 ÄM/Ähnlichkeitsanalyse/Möwe/ReadVsLewis: Problem: Bsp (angenommen, John ist in Alaska) Wenn John nicht in der Türkei ist, dann ist er nicht in Paris - dieser Bedingungssatz ist nach der »Ähnlichkeitserklärung« wahr, weil sie nur danach fragt, ob der Dann-Satz in der ähnlichsten Welt wahr ist.
Logic Texts
Me I Albert Menne Folgerichtig Denken Darmstadt 1988
HH II Hoyningen-Huene Formale Logik, Stuttgart 1998
Re III Stephen Read Philosophie der Logik Hamburg 1997
Sal IV Wesley C. Salmon Logik Stuttgart 1983
Sai V R.M.Sainsbury Paradoxien Stuttgart 2001
Subjunctive Conditionals Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Goodman II VIII (Foreword, Putnam)
Subjunctive Conditionals/Counterfactual Conditionals: Much discussed problem today. David Lewis: has developed formalist scheme that assumes a totality of possible worlds and a "similarity metric" that measures their similarity in degrees. GoodmanVsLewis: these are not solutions that give us principles for deciding which of the possible worlds are more or less similar to the actual one.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Sugar Trail Example Cresswell
 
Books on Amazon
II 183
Supermarket-Example / Sugar track example/ Perry / Cresswell: Perry Solution: Proposition / Perry: a set of triples of persons, times and worlds. Respectively. as a function of people and times to sets of worlds. - Problem: this proposition does not explain the stopping of the shopping cart! - Solution / Lewis: the object of belief is not a sentence, but rather a property which is the meaning of "I m making a mess." (Self-attribution). - Boer / LycanVsLewis: self-ascription is an unclear term.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984

Terminology Castaneda
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Frank I 325
Guise Theory/Castaneda: "Theory of ontological formations". Draws ontological consequences from the semantic discovery that private references have uneliminable meaning (non-substitutability) and from the intensionality conditions - not between thinking and the world, but primarily reference of thinking - because the private must no longer be excluded from the object area - furhtermore to thinking and world can remain typically propositionally structured. (VsLewis/VsChisholm).
I 337f
"Doxastic Accusative"/Castaneda: avoids facts as objects - thinking episodes are individuated by their accusatives - accusative: an attribute, not a thing.
I 386 ~
Doxastic Accusatives/Castaneda: Problem: pure universals are too far away, particularized properties or propositions are too big - Solution: Guise theory of formations: middle road: particularized properties, particularized to very thin, finite individuals.
I 463ff
Guise/CastanedaVsFrege: consubstantiation: sameness of Oedipus' father and Oedipus' predecessor on the throne - VsFrege: every singular term, denotes an object in each use - no varying denotation - designs one-dimensional, not like Frege: two-dimensional: purpose and object.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999


Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Time Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
I 192
Verzweigte Zeit/Mögliche Welten/Bigelow/Pargetter: wir erlauben, dass die Zeit verzweigt ist, d.h. zu jeder Vergangenheit gibt es mehrere Zukünfte. Da sollten wir auch erlauben, dass so etwas für die Entwicklung innerhalb einer möglich ist. D.h. zwei Teile könnten denselben Ursprung haben. Ebenso Fusion und vorübergehendes Zusammengehen von Teilen. Problem: es ist verwunderlich, dass solche Teile dann zumindest einen zeitlichen Teil gemeinsam haben müssten.
Bsp Angenommen, wir treffen Jane aus einem anderen Teil derselben möglichen Welt. Betrachten wir das
Kontrafaktisches Konditional: wenn wir Jane nicht getroffen hätten, hätte sie nicht existiert.
BigelowVsLewis: nach ihm muss das wahr sein
Bigelow/Pargetter: nach uns ist es klarerweise falsch. Es muss daher mindestens eine mögliche Welt geben, in der Jane existiert und wir sie nicht treffen. Und diese Möwe muss uns dann alle Jane und uns enthalten, obwohl es keine Verbindung zwischen uns gibt.
LewisVsVs: dieser müsste dann irgendeine andere Verbindung und entsprechendes kontrafaktisches Konditional annehmen: „…ein Vorfahre oder Nachfahre von uns hätte einen Vorfahren oder Nachfahren von ihr treffen können“ usw.
BigelowVsLewis: das ist immer noch falsch in der fraglichen Welt und weniger plausibel als das obige kontrafaktische Konditional. Das zeigt die Falschheit der temporalen Theorie.

BigelowVsLewis: dieser ist in einem Dilemma: entweder er nimmt die Weltgefährten-Relation als primitiven Grundbegriff oder er lässt modale Grundbegriffe zu.
I 193
Gegenstück-Relation/GR/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: Lewis stützt sich aber noch auf eine wichtigere Relation, die Gegenstück-Relation: sie ist auch kein guter Kandidat für einen unanalysierten Grundbegriff, und dennoch braucht auch sie wiederum modale Grundbegriffe. BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsGegenstück-Theorie/Bigelow/Pargetter: sie führt auch in die Zirkularität, weil sie modale Begriffe voraussetzt. D.h. sie kann die Modallogik nicht begründen.


Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Truthmakers Armstrong
 
Books on Amazon
II 21
Truth Maker/Tr.M./Armstrong: Problem: counterfactual conditionals point to something that does not exist: "counterfactual state" therefore no truth maker - there are no counterfactual states - ((s) see below but there are counterfactual facts (as assumptions).
II 66
Truth Maker/Counterfactual Conditional/Co.Co./Place: special disposition, finite (like Goodman, nominalist) - ArmstrongVsPlace: tr.m.: law, infinite
II 92
Truth Maker/Armstrong: are also necessary for the true attribution of unmanifested dispositions - but non-disp properties plus laws of nature are sufficient - two non-occurring, equally likely events: k fact as tr.m. - Same case: E.g. distant elementary particles that never react would behave idiosyncratically: k truth maker, k certain way, nevertheless: counterfactual conditional applies: if they had come together, they would have idiosyncratic.../(s)"idiosyncratic" does not designate the manner nor does it determine it.
II 99
Law/Armstrong:. Truth makers for law statements - atomic state Rel high order between U the number of instantiation is irrelevant, all identical, therefore F is deducible from a: a is G - Hume: molecular state, GF - Armstrong: here, these many cases only extend the law and do not justify deduction from the unobserved.
II 121
Truth Maker/Armstrong: a single law of nature G makes a universal law statement true and covers all instantiations - PlaceVsArmstrong: individual truth makers necessary.
II 156
Truth Maker/Place: tempting: that the state, which makes the counterfactual conditional true is the same which makes the causal GA true from which it is epistemically derived - (Vs"counterfactual facts") - PlaceVs, Vs"general facts" - VsArmstrong , VsThought-Independent Laws of Nature as Truth Makers -> II 176
II 175f
Truth Maker/MartinVsArmstrong: still unclear whether its invocation of laws is strong enough, to provide the full ontological weight as truth maker for the solvability of salt that was not put in water.
II 176
Whichever he quotes, they seem to be wrong for the situation, namely solely for the situation of the compound, i.e. the actual manifestation.
II 182 f
Absence/Lack/Holes/MartinVsLewis: actually is a suitable truth maker: state - problem: state merely "general fact" (Russell) (>general term) - Lewis: "as it is", "how things are" must not simply cover everything that is fulfilled by things, otherwise trivial - Lewis: truth supervenes on what things there are and what properties and relations they instantiate -MartinVsLewis: "the way the universe" is a general term, but still 1st order! - Solution/Martin: reciprocal disposition partnes for mutual manifestation - Existence Theorem/Martin: whether positive or negative: the world is at the other end and not in vain.

AR II = Disp
D. M. Armstrong

In
Dispositions, Tim Crane, London New York 1996

AR III
D. Armstrong
What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge 1983

Two Omniscient Gods Castaneda
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Frank I 356 f
Two omniscient gods / Example/ Lewis: omniscient: only through knowledge of all propositions - but incapable of self-ascribe the decisive properties, since properties (attributes) are not propositional - CatanedaVsLewis: his notion of the unique counterpart fits more to the part-subject areas of private objects - the overlapping structure would be a total world, and each extension would be "my World" for every person in the world. Therefore, Lewis Example of the two Gods is not evident, even not if we equate propositions with sets of possible worlds.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999


Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Values Lewis
 
Books on Amazon
Graeser I 190
Value/Validation/Lewis: These values ​​should be considered as feeling, believing, desiring - ultimately desire of desire - HarmanVsLewis: 1) intrinsic desire of a higher level misleading. "Desire" has the meaning of intention and is, just like any intention, already self-referential. ---
I 191
FrankfurtVsHarman: risk of blurring the distinction between the goal (s) and the means, and thus committing oneself to the assumption that goals are equipped with means in a certain way and that’s how we come across them. ---
Schw I 185
Value/ethics/Lewis/Schwarz: values are not inherent in the validated events, but in us. In our wishes - Problem: just because you want something, it’s not necessarily good - Solution: Wishes 2nd stage: desire not to want to smoke - best theory: dispositional - Problem: latent relativism. ---
Schw I 187
LewisVsUtilitarism: neglects perspective.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991


Grae I
A. Graeser
Positionen der Gegenwartsphilosophie. München 2002

The author or concept searched is found in the following 103 controversies.
Disputed term/author/ism Author Vs Author
Entry
Reference
Armstrong, D. Kripke Vs Armstrong, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Frank I 121
KripkeVsIdentity Theory: Does not fulfill this easiest requirement: Pain must be felt as pain, otherwise it is not a pain! Causal role: e.g. intention elicits action, pain, behavior when in pain. Identity theories/KripkeVsLewis/KripkeVsArmstrong: Usually assume that stimuli and causal roles change a particular brain state to a particular psychological state. This suggests erroneously that the representatives claim that this causation is contingent. Or that the identity of this brain state with different mental states is random.
Identity theory:
1. X is a brain condition 2. The fact is contingent that pain is being caused by a particular stimulus. (This sounds quite plausible after all) and evokes a certain behavior.
The brain state can now also exist without causing the appropriate behavior.
Thus, it seems that 1) and 2) claim that a certain pain could have existed without having been pain.
Identity/KripkeVsIdentity theory: if x = y, then x and y share all their properties. Including their modal characteristics.
E.g. if x is the pain and y is the brain state, it is an essential property of x to be a particular pain and an essential characteristic of y to be a particular brain state!
If the relationship between the two is indeed identity, then y needs to correspond to a particular pain, and x needs to correspond to a particular brain condition, namely y.
Both statements, however, seem to be wrong.

K I
S.A. Kripke
Name und Notwendigkeit Frankfurt 1981

K III
S. A. Kripke
Outline of a Theory of Truth (1975)
In
Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, R. L. Martin (Hg), Oxford/NY 1984

Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Armstrong, D. Lewis Vs Armstrong, D.
 
Books on Amazon
V 353
"New Work for a Theory of Universals" (1983) Universals/Armstrong: His theory of U. is supposed to be the solution for the problem of the One and the Multitude.
LewisVsArmstrong: But it allows for either nominalist solutions or for no solution of any kind.
- - -
Schwarz I 71
Combinatorialism/Armstrong: Merely consists of several fundamental properties for which - contrary to colours- any combination should be possible(1986,§7). LewisVs: 1986a,86, HellerVs (1998): It is unclear whether this is actually possible. LewisVsArmstrong: As such the problem is not solved, it only allows different interpretations of the descriptions: When does a set of sentences represent the fact that there are donkeys if there is no mention of donkeys? It does represent this fact if the sentences imply the existence of donkeys (1986e, 150 157).
Problem: Modality is required.
VsVs: It could be stated that the relationship between the distribution of fundamental properties and of all other truths is analytic, and can be characterized without requiring primitive modal vocabulary. (2002b, Heller 1996, see below Chapter 11. (LewisVs: 1992a,209).
- - -
Schwarz I 118
Laws of Nature/LoN/DretskeVsLewis/TooleyVsLewis/ArmstrongVsLewis: There is something missing in Lewis’ LoN: For Lewis, LoN are simple regularities. But they should be more than that. Dretske-Tooley-Armstrong-Theory: Thesis: LoN are based on fundamental relations between universals, therefore properties. Since regularities are logically independent from local events, possible worlds with precisely the same local events can nicely differ in their Laws of Nature. For one world, it may be a regularity, for the other, a relation of universals.
Relation of Universals: is the foundation for everything and cannot be analyzed. To state that there is a relation between F's and G's because all F's are G's is not enough. This would be the regularity theory.
SchwarzVs: This leads to problems with not instantiated universals (Mellor 1980, §6).
Laws of Nature/LewisVsArmstrong/LewisVsTooley/LewisVsDretske: If LoN express fundamental relations between universals which are logically independent from observable regularities why do we assume that physics will tell us something about LoN?
Schwarz I 119
What is the use of universals? Physicists only want to observe regularities. And what is then the relation between universals and regularities? Additional explanations will then be needed! How could a rule-maker exclude that N(F,G) is valid, but some F's are nevertheless not G's. It is not resolved by giving a name to the "rule-maker" like Armstrong does with the term "necessitation". NG/LewisVsArmstrong: Better: Regularities which are justified because of a primitive relation between universals. It is a relationship which also exists in poss.w. in which NG is not valid. It is rather more obscure, but at least not a miracle anymore that all F's are G's if a LoN demands it.
Schwarz I 124
Probability/LewisVsArmstrong: Vs fundamental probability- Property. Fundamental properties cannot fulfill the role which we attribute to probability.
Schw I 139
Cause/Causation/Armstrong: Absence is not a real cause. LewisVsArmstrong: Yes, it is. However, it is so common that is it ignored - Problem: Numerous absences in vacuum.
Schwarz I 140
Solution/Lewis: Absences are absolutely nothing, there is nothing. Problem: If absence is only empty space-time region, why would oxygen - and not nitrogen- only exist because of absence? > Solution/Lewis: "Influence", small increase of probability – I 141 counterfactual dependence as well between the how, when and where of the event.
Schwarz I 231
Def Principle of truth-maker/To make truth/Armstrong/Martin/Schwarz: All truths must be based on the ontology. Strong form: For each truth, there is something that makes it true. Its existence necessarily implies the truth. LewisVsArmstrong: That is too strong, e.g. the example "no unicorns exist" is true, not because there is something specific, but because unicorns really do not exist. (1992a,204, 2001b,611f).
Truthmaker: Would be an object here which only exists in worlds in which there are no unicorns. Problem: Why is it not possible for this object to also exist in worlds in which there are unicorns? Answer: Such an object would be a contradiction to the principle of recombination.
SchwarzVsLewis: But this is not true: the truth-maker for "no unicorns exist" could be an object which essentially lives in a poss.w. without unicorns. However, the object could very well have duplicates in the poss.w. with unicorns. The counterpart relation is not a relation of intrinsic resemblance.
To make truth/Predicate/Armstrong/Schwarz: (Armstrong 1997a,205f): If object A has the property F, an object must exist which implies the existence of this fact.
LewisVsArmstrong: Why can this object not exist, although A is not F?(1998b). If A is F in one world, but it is not so in the other world, why is it always necessary to have something that exists in one poss.w., but is missing in the other world: Two poss.w. are only different on the grounds of the characteristics the objects have in their worlds.
((s) So different characteristics in an area that remains constant).
Characteristics/Truth-maker/Lewis: A truth-maker is not needed for something that has a (basic) characteristic: The sentence "A is F" is true because A has the characteristic F. That is all. (1998b, 219).
Def Principle of truth-maker/LewisVsArmstrong/Schwarz: Only the following will then remain: Truth supervenes upon the things that exist, and upon perfect natural characteristics which it chooses to instantiate.(1992a,207,1994a,225, Bigelow 1988, §25).
Whenever two possibilities are different from each other, there are either different objects in them or this objects have different fundamental characteristics.(1992a,206, 2001b,§4).
Schwarz I 232
N.B.: If there are possibilities that are qualitatively indistinguishable, but numerically different(which Lewis neither states nor denies, 1986e,224), the principle must be limited to qualitative truths or characteristics (1992a, 206f). If there are none, simplification is possible: No other two possibilities are exactly the same regarding which objects exist as well as the fundamental characteristics are instantiated.((s) If the distribution of fundamental characteristics sets everything, then the objects are set as well. As such, the poss.w. are only different regarding their characteristics, but these are naturally then set.) Schwarz: This can be amplified.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Armstrong, D. Wright Vs Armstrong, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 153
VsBasis equations/WrightVsLewis/WrightVsArmstrong/WrightVsCounterfactual conditionals: counterfactual conditionals sind in der Geschichte der Philosophie kaum auffallend erfolgreich gewesen. Problem: folgender Satz kann immer zunichte gemacht werden, wenn es möglich ist, dass die Verwirklichung von Q kausal störend auf einen Sachverhalt einwirkten könnte, der selbst faktisch auf den Wahrheitswert von P Einfluss ausübt:
P dann und nur dann, wenn (wäre es der Fall, dass Q), es der Fall wäre, dass R
(P = Aussage, Q = "Licht an", R = Reaktion).
Bsp Johnston: ein Chamäleon sitzt im Dunkeln auf einem grünen Billardtisch. Dann kann die Herbeiführung von "Standard" Bedingungen eine Veränderung bewirken, die wir an der Hautfarbe des Chamäleons ablesen können.
Wenn nun aber die Wahrheitsbedingungen korrekt durch das konjunktivische Konditional erfasst würden, dann müssten wir sagen "Das Chamäleon ist grün, bis die Lichter angehen".
I 154
Konditionaler Fehlschluss: hier wirkt die Klasse der Urteile, an denen wir interessiert sind, an der kausalen Ordnung mit. Es kann daher nicht a priori gelten, dass die Wahrheitsbedingungen für P durch die zu analysierende Aussage erfasst werden.
Vs: wir haben doch sicherlich, wenn wir einen kontrafaktischen Konditionalsatz betrachten, nur einschlägig relevante, nicht abwegige mögliche Situationen zu betrachten!

VsVs: das ist aber so, im Fall des Bsp Chamäleons. Der Einwand verfehlt den Kern: die Art der Äquivalenz, an der wir interessiert sind, muss a priori gültig sein können.
I 155
Es muss möglich sein, a priori zu wissen, dass die Implementierung des Antezedens diejenigen Verhältnisse nicht materiell beeinflussen wird, die auf die tatsächlichen Wahrheitswerte des Analysandums einwirken können. Aber wie könnte man dies wissen, ohne kollaterale empirische Information über die Eigenart der Welt, in der man sich tatsächlich befindet?
Also: a priori korrekte konjunktivisch konditionale Kennzeichnungen der Wahrheitsbedingungen (im uns interessierenden Diskurs) sind nicht zu bekommen. Die Basisgleichung ist zu verwerfen.
Statt dessen:
"Provisorische Gleichungen"/Wright: das Problem mit dem Bsp Chamäleon könnte nicht passieren, wenn wir festgelegt hätten, dass es um seine Farbe unter Standardbedingungen geht, die ein Standard Beobachter zu prüfen hat
Änderung der Wahrheitswerte dürfte kein Problem sein, wenn es der Wahrheitswert von P unter C Bedingungen (keine anderen Umstände)ist, den S unter C Bedingungen beurteilen soll.
Provisorische Gleichung:
Wenn CS, dann (Es würde der Fall sein, dass P dann und nur dann, wenn S urteilen würde, dass P).
So konzentrieren wir uns nicht auf Bikonditionale mit konditionalen Teilen zur Rechten, sondern auf Konditionale mit bikonditionalen Konsequenzen.

Wri I
Cr. Wright
Wahrheit und Objektivität Frankfurt 2001
Armstrong, D. Stalnaker Vs Armstrong, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 9
Def Universals/Armstrong/Lewis: repeatable entities that are fully present when a single thing instantiated them.
StalnakerVsLewis: what shall the difference between "fully present" and "partly present" be? That is too obscure.
I 10
Properties/universals/StalnakerVsArmstrong: I do not want to be nominalistic but the model of property space does not suggest things like the ones Armstrong favored. E.g. if the property red is a region in space property (prop.sp.) then it would be like to say that the c is part of the rose as to say that Texas is a complete part of George W. Bush when he is in Texas.

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Armstrong, D. Wessel Vs Armstrong, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 305
Def Naturgesetz/Wessel: hier wird behauptet, dass eine wahre allgemeine konditionale Aussage dann ein Gesetz ausdrückt, wenn ihr wahre irreale Konditionalaussagen entsprechen. (>Lewis, Armstrong) Im Gegensatz dazu trifft eine bloß gesetzesartige Aussage nicht auf alle möglichen Gegenstände zu.
Gesetze wie das von der Spule gelten auch für während der Steinzeit von außerirdischen auf die Erde gebrachte Exemplare.
I 306
Es wird vorausgesetzt, dass die Wahrheit der irrealen Bedingungssätze unabhängig von der Gesetzesaussage festgestellt werden kann. Das ist für irreale Bedingungssätze aber in der Regel schwer. WesselVsArmstrong/WesselVsLewis: These: der irreale Bedingungs-Satz ist von der realen Aussage abhängig.
Gesetzesaussagen stützen und garantieren die Gültigkeit entsprechender irrealer Konditionale und nicht umgekehrt!
Bsp ..."Selbst wenn": solche Aussagen gelten als wahr, weil das Konsequens "sowieso wahr" ist.
alltagssprachliche Übersetzung:
Bsp "Es ist nicht so, dass es regnet, wenn der Schamane tanzt und er tanzt nicht und es regnet nicht".

We I
H. Wessel
Logik Berlin 1999
Attribution Theory Castaneda Vs Attribution Theory
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Frank I 322
Attribution theory/Terminology/Castaneda: his expression of the theory of Chisholm/Lewis, self-attribution. Theory/Terminology/Castaneda: represents what he called dia philosophy: alternative theories can be evolved tgether.
CastanedaVsChisholm: VsAttributionstheorie: does not explain sufficiently the explicit self-esteem (SB).
I 323
"Unsustainable Fichteanism": Fichte: no consciousness without self-consciousness.
I 329
Proposition/Belief/Sself-attribution/CastanedaVsAttribution theory/CastanedaVsLewis: 1) Lewis defines the belief objects extensionally (from quantities).
This violates Castaneda’s second intentionality condition for the objects of intentional attitudes. (see above).
Possible Worlds are unsuitable as primary objects of belief because of their infinite extension (infinitely many aspects) and properties cannot be individuated by sets of objects, because the creation of sets presupposes the predication of properties. (>Individuation).
2. Lewis’ thesis that self-attribution can be explained only by a non-propositional knowledge depends on the premise that there could be no indexical proposition or related related to private issues.
CastanedaVsLewis: but it lacks a convincing justification.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999

Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Barcan, R. Cresswell Vs Barcan, R.
 
Books on Amazon
HC I 150
Existence/Modality/Barcan formula/BF/Hughes/Cresswell: there are versions of T, S4 with and without BF (but not of S5). Question: Can we provide an analysis of the validity that matches the versions without BF, namely PK + T and PK + T S4? Barcan formula/Camps: VsBarcan: Prior (1957), Hintikka (1961), Myhill (1958) Defense: Barcan (1962)
Barcan formula/BF/Hughes/Cresswell: for our purposes we best consider it in this form
(x) Lfx > L(x)fx (notation: (x) L phi x > L(x) phi x). Everyday language translation/Hughes/Cresswell: if everything necessarily has a certain property phi, it is necessarily the case that everything has that property. ((s) i.e. not: "there is necessarily".) > Fact ((s) fact/(s): would an operator "it is a fact that ..." then be intensional? Would he add something? Vs: Which is in the conditional tense anyway.)
VsBarcan/Hughes/Cresswell: because of the fact that everything that exists is necessarily phi the possibility is not excluded that there might be things (or might have been) that are not phi, and in this case it would not be a necessary truth, that everything is phi. Hughes/Cresswell: This objection is based on the assumption that in different possible worlds ) objects may not only have properties that are different from those they have in the real world , but that there may even be objects that do not exist in the real world at all. Semantics of possible worlds/Semantics/Predicate calculus/PC (/Modality/Hughes/Cresswell: now it is at least plausible to assume that the semantics that we have given for the modal predicate calculus implicitly negates this condition, since we assumed in each model a single individuals range which is the same for all possible worlds the validity of the BF indeed depends on this property of the semantics. ((s)> LewisVsKripke, KripkeVsLewis). I 151 Then we can gain a semantic in which BF is invalid by allowing models where different possible worlds are assigned different ranges.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Behaviorism Lewis Vs Behaviorism
 
Books on Amazon
I 15
LewisVsBehaviorism: My principle is better: 1. Events can become real. 2. It also allows us to include other events to typical causes and effects, through which an event is defined. ((s)VsLewis: one can can interpose as many descriptions as one wants between catalyst and effects. But it is not possible to do so for as many phenomenons as one wants.
3. We are not forced to define an event by stating all causes and effects of every one of his occurrences. (The typical ones are sufficient).
I 15
Introspection: When events are defined by their causal role, there are accessible for introspection. And this accessibility is an important characteristic of each event. This means that the event preferably causes other events which are intentionally directed at it. VsBehaviorism: According to Behaviorism,the liberty to define events through other events does not exist. Such definitions are only acceptable here if they principally be eliminated. (Hierarchy).
I 15
LewisVsBehaviorism: He does not acknowledge that the event is something different because of its defining causes and manifestations. By using his criteria, he can only partially explain what an event is. It always leads to an assumption.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Bigelow, J. Lewis Vs Bigelow, J.
 
Books on Amazon
Big I 222
Laws of Nature/LoN/Bigelow/Pargetter: Thesis: cannot be described adequately in a non-modal language. And this because NG is not only a regularity. logical form: i.e. a NG cannot only be represented in this form:
(x)(Fx > Gx)
logical form : a NG will often be a universal generalization (Gen)[universelle Generalisierung (UG)]. But it may also be a different generalization or a different form of sentence. But we are assuming here that laws of nature involve universal generalizations, and will therefore have the following form:
I 223
natL(x)(Fx > Gx). (x) Fx would > would Gx)
((s) If something were an F, it would be a G).
LoN/Bigelow/Pargetter: Thesis: this is the view on NG which we defend.
LewisVsBigelow (1979): the theory is circular.
I 231
LewisVsBigelow: Vsmodal theory. Bigelow/Pargetter: We explain laws through accessibility
Lewis: explains accessibility through laws.
Bigelow/Pargetter: If Lewis is right, our theory is circular.
Lösung/Lewis: s.u.
BigelowVsVs/BigelowVsLewis: We deny that accessibility must be explained through similarity. The world that has the easiest access is not necessarily the world which resembles the other one the most.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989
Chisholm, R.M. Austin Vs Chisholm, R.M.
 
Books on Amazon
Sellars I XVI
Uncorrectability/AustinVsLewis, Cl.I./AustinVsChisholm: it is wrong to believe that statements about how a speaker conceives something are excluded from error. One cannot deceive oneself with regard to his own ideas, but mistakes can occur in the description of one's own ideas, recognition and memories.
John L. Austin
I Austin Wahrheit in: Wahrheitstheorien Hrsg. Skirbekk, Frankfurt/M 1996
II Jörgen Husted "Austin" aus :Hügli (Hrsg) Philosophie im 20. Jahrhhundert, Reinbek 1993
III Austin: "Ein Plädoyer für Entschuldigungen" aus: Linguistik und Philosophie (Grewendorf/Meggle(Hg)) Frankfurt (Athenäum) 1974/1995
Chisholm, R.M. Castaneda Vs Chisholm, R.M.
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Chisholm I 43
CastanedaVsChisholm: For him, propositions of the first person are not abstract (eternal) objects, but contingent things. They cease to exist when the person x ceases to exist. - - -
Frank I 330
Self-attribution/Chisholm: Builds on Lewis. Any attribution by others contains a self-reference (implicit). I 331 Consciousness/CastanedaVsChisholm: everybody first refers to their own world (as per Chisholm), but from that does not follow the necessity that every consciousness and every thought are explicitly self-conscious. (CastanedaVsFichte). The first-person perspective is only implicitly contained in a non-reflexive consciousness. An explicit self-consciousness differs from this consciousness, however, if it refers to conscious explicit self-reference. Self-attribution/CastanedaVsChisholm: if every consciousness includes direct attribution, including an I-less, purely world-facing consciousness, then direct attribution can only express a purely objective self-understanding and therefore does not explain self-consciousness. When Chisholm points out that reflection still has to be added, he argues circularly, because this self-consciousness should be explained just by the self-attribution.
I 332
Reflection/self-consciousness/ChisholmVsCastaneda/Grundmann: This does not go to the heart of Chisholm’s argument: this would ultimately reject the insinuation that in the self-attribution a purely external or objective self-reference is articulated. External self-reference: extremely rare. E.g. Mach, Omnibus (see above). Self-attribution/Chisholm: denominates implicit self-consciousness. VsChisholm: However, he fails to explain the transformation from implicit to explicit self-consciousness. Reduction/CastanedaVsChisholm: according to Chisholm, the use of all indicators can be traced back to those of the first person. E.g. the subject attributes itself the property of directing its attention to a book and indirectly attributes to this book the property of being witty and exciting.
I 333
Consubstantiation/CastanedaVsChisholm: the activity of directing the attention is only consubstantiated (implicit) in a determining sentence. Accordingly, the intentional act is not part of the demonstrative thought.
I 338
Attribution/CastanedaVsLewis/CastanedaVsChisholm: should not be monolithic: it is necessary to distinguish between propositional attitude and practitions: "mixed conditionals": E.g. the intention to close the window when I open the door is different from the intention to open the door when I close the window.
I 375
Consciousness/Attribution theory/CastanedaVsChisholm: Problem: distinction between reflective and non-reflective consciousness. This is a semantic pragmatic distinction between thought contents and it collides with Chisholm’s unit syntax.
Fra I 380
Properties/CastanedaVsChisholm: 1) Considers properties to be subjects of predication 2) Quantifies over them - devastating in deontological contexts - too complicated for cumulative quotes.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999

Chi I
R. Chisholm
Die erste Person Frankfurt 1992

Chi III
Roderick M. Chisholm
Erkenntnistheorie Graz 2004

Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Chisholm, R.M. Lycan Vs Chisholm, R.M.
 
Books on Amazon
Cresswell II 183
Selbstzuschreibung/Boer/LycanVsLewis/LycanVsChisholm: (Boer/Lycan (1980, 445) der Begriff ist alles andere als klar. Selbstreferenz/Lakoff/Cresswell: (Lakoff 1972, 639): Bsp „Ich träumte ich wäre Brigitte Bardot und ich küßte mich“. (Stechow 1982, 43-45).

Lyc I
W. G. Lycan
Modality and Meaning

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Counterfactual Conditional Fraassen Vs Counterfactual Conditional
 
Books on Amazon
I 115
Counterfactual Conditional/Co.co./Causation/Cause/Lewis/Fraassen: Under certain circumstances, after all, it is logically correct to say: whenever "A is the cause of B" is true, it is also true that if A had not existed, B would not have existed either. FraassenVsCounterfactual Conditionals/FraassenVsLewis: Problem: E.g. Assuming, if the alarm had not gone off, David would have not woken up; we will concede that, however: if he had not slept the night before, he would not have woken up! Problem: it should not be the cause of his awakening that he went to sleep. Solution/Lewis: Counterfactual conditional sorts out the nodes in the causal network, while "because" points to specific factors. Relevance: E.g. falling asleep is not relevant for waking up at a certain time, even though it is a necessary condition. Not every necessary condition is relevant. Context-Dependent/Fraassen: every theory of causality must explain what is discarded as unimportant. And this is done in relation to context. This, in turn, is objective. That much context dependency must always be. Problem: there is still much more of it if we are dealing with counterfactual conditionals. FraassenVsCounterfactual Conditionals/FrassenVsLewis: in science, there is nothing that corresponds to counterfactual conditionals with their extreme context dependence: Science is not context-dependent. Ceteris Paribus/Fraassen: the factors that are held fixed are in the mind of the speaker! They are speaker-dependent! And it depends on the broader context, whether what I silently presume collides with the situation or not. E.g. The match is dry.
I 118
E.g. Danny is interested in women. Would he be a lesbian if he were a woman? Solution: the content of "ceteris paribus" is not only determined by the one sentence and the specific situation, but also by factors of context. FraassenVsCounterfactual conditionals: they are no solution here: scientific statements are not context-dependent. Therefore science implies no counterfactual conditional (if they are, as I believe, context-dependent). Counterfactual Conditionals/Laws of Nature/LoN/Reichenbach/Goodman/Hempel: Thesis: Counterfactual conditionals provide an objective criterion for what a law is or at least a law-like statement. Because only laws, but not general truths, imply counterfactual conditionals. FraassenVsCounterfactual Conditionals/FraassenVsGoodman: this idea needs to be reversed: if laws imply counterfactual conditionals, then, because they are context-dependent. Law/LoN/Fraassen: the concept of law does not point to any objective distinction in nature. Counterfactual Conditionals/Explanation/Fraassen: nevertheless, I believe that counterfactual conditionals are suitable for explanations, but that means that explanations are crucially context-dependent.

Fr I
B. van Fraassen
The Scientific Image Oxford 1980
Counterfactual Conditional Schwarz Vs Counterfactual Conditional
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 131
Similarity criteria/VsLewis: but even so a counterfactual dependence without causality would be possible: E.g. the halting problem would be solvable, were the PL decidable (because counterfactual conditionals with a false antecedent is always true with Lewis) but that one is not the cause of the other. Vs counterfactual conditional/Vs co.co: Problem: after the previous analysis every event would also cause itself: it would not happen, then it would not have happened! E.g. Jaegwon Kim (1973, 1974): if Socrates had not died, Xanthippe would not have become a widow, e.g. had I not turned the window handle, I would not have opened the window, e.g. had I not written "rr", I would not have written "Larry". Everything counterfactual relations without causality.
Solution/Lewis: we must limit the Relata A and B: they may neither be mathematical truths nor be identical to each other. Allowed are only contingent, non-overlapping single events.
Overlapping/Schwarz: "Non-overlapping" is weaker than "not identical". ((s) "overlapping" can also be "not identical". This excludes that e.g. a football match caused its first half..) ((s)> Hume: Only between non-identical events causality can be effective).
LewisVsKim: so also its examples are done: partly the entities Kim considered, are no events (e.g. Xanthippe) partly it is a single event, described by two identifiers (e.g. window), or two events that are not completely separated (E.g. Larry). (1981c, 124).

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Counterpart Theory Bigelow Vs Counterpart Theory
 
Books on Amazon
I 168
VsCounterpart theory/cth/Bigelow/Pargetter: can also be avoided differently. By conceiving properties as relations. Because properties are subject to change, we can consider them as a relation between an individual and a point in time. I 193 BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsCounterpart theory/Bigelow/Pargetter: it also leads to circularity, because it presupposes modal concepts. That means it cannot justify modal logic. I 195 Counterpart theory/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: his cth has two components that must fulfil the counterparts (CP): 1) sufficient similarity with an original in the actual world, i.e. there is a "threshold" value. 2) the world companions have to resemble the actual thing at least in the same way as the cp. BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsCounterpart theory: Problem: the threshold value again conatains presupposed modal concepts ((s) option to deviate from the real world). Ad 2) That excludes options that we do not want to exclude.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Counterpart Theory Plantinga Vs Counterpart Theory
 
Books on Amazon
Black I 57
Counterpart Theory/C.Th./PlantingaVsLewis/PlantingaVsCounterpart Theory: (1974, p. 115 f, 1987, p. 209): According to Lewis, strictly speaking all things would then have all their properties essentially, because there are no possible worlds in which they themselves (not just any placeholders) have different properties. E.g. if it was one degree colder today, we would all not exist, because then a different possible world would be real, and none of us would be there. Kripke similar:
KripkeVsCounterpart Theory/KripkeVsLewis: E.g. if we say "Humphrey could have won the election," according to Lewis we are not talking about Humphrey, but about someone else. And he could not care less. (Kripke 1980, 44 f).
- - -
Schwarz I 100
Properties/VsCounterpart Theory/Schwarz: if we reject counterparts and temporal parts, we have to conceive all properties as masked relations to times and possible worlds. Then there are obviously many more fundamental relations. - - -
Stalnaker I 117
Identity/Stalnaker: ...these examples remind us of what an inflexible relation identity is. Our intuitions about the flexibility of possibilities contradict this rigid constitution of identity. Counterpart Theory/C.Th./Stalnaker: tells us "Relax!". We should introduce a more flexible relation for the cross-world identity that allows intransitivity and asymmetry.
Counterpart Theory/Stalnaker: the 3rd motivation for them is the one that is closest to the phenomena and makes the least metaphysical presuppositions.
Vs: actualism and the representative of a primitive thisness may have difficulty with that.
I 118
PlantingaVsCounterpart Theory/Nathan SalmonVsCounterpart Theory/Stalnaker: Counterpart Theory/Plantinga/Salmon: can be divided into two doctrines: 1) Metaphysical Thesis: that the realms of different possible worlds do not overlap ((s) >Lewis: "Nothing is in two worlds").
2) Semantic Thesis: that modal predicates should be interpreted in terms of counterparts instead of in terms of the individuals themselves.
Ad 1): seems to suggest an extreme essentialism, according to which nothing could have been different than it actually is.
Extreme Essentialism/Plantinga: would the thesis that "~if a leaf had dropped a day earlier in the mountains of the Northern Cascades in October 1876 than it actually did, I would either be non-existent, or a person who is different from me. And that is certainly wrong". (Plantinga 1973).
can ad 2): Can the semantic part of the doctrine solve that?
Plantinga/Salmon: it cannot. It can only mask the metaphysical consequences.

Plant I
A. Plantinga
The Nature of Necessity (Clarendon Library of Logic and Philosophy) Revised ed. Edition 1979

Bla I
Max Black
Bedeutung und Intention
In
Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, G. Meggle (Hg), Frankfurt/M 1979

Bla II
M. Black
Sprache München 1973

Bla III
M. Black
The Prevalence of Humbug Ithaca/London 1983

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Descriptivism Lewis Vs Descriptivism
 
Books on Amazon
Stalnaker I 212
Def Local Descriptivism/Lewis/Stalnaker: Is simply a way to describe a part of the language vi another part.((s) The only possibility,according to Lewis and Stalnaker.) The broader paradigm of Kaplan corresponds to:
Def Global Descriptivism/Lewis/Stalnaker: (Lewis 1984, 224) The entirety of a speaker's language is taken as a description of the world. (Theory). All terms of the language are interpreted at the same time, and statements on the world are made by establishing the theory.
i.e. the terms refer to "whatever things", characteristics and relations render the theory true, as much as it is possible.
LewisVsGlobal Descriptivism/Stalnaker: This cannot work because it is then impossible to explain how statements can be wrong. This is Putnam's Paradox.
Def Putnam's Paradox/Stalnaker/(s): If a language is taken as a whole in order to explain all terms (and to set all its references) at the same time, then statements refer to "whatever things". And then relations and characteristics are always going to be what renders the theory the most truthful.
Language/Thinking/World/Reality/Lewis/Stalnaker: Additional condition for global descriptivism: The easy terms must split the word "at its joints" ["an den Gelenken aufteilen"]. ((s) But this is not given with one language.)
LewisVsGlobal Descriptivism.
StalnakerVsGlobal Descriptivism/StalnakerVsLewis: Such a metasemantic theory is not going to work, but if it were, the theory would give us quite a different depiction of our thoughts' contents.
1. Were the theory holistic, whatever somebody thinks depends from everything else he/she is thinking
2. Were the theory solipsistic, causal relations would depend on the use of the person. Then "Tullius" would mean something different for each person using it.
Problem: We would then only speak about the language in the highest degree of generalization. We would not only be unable to refer to singular things which are different from the others, we would also describe the things not by their basic characteristics, but only in terms of characteristics and relations which fit the best, in order to render our theory, which is not interpreted, true.
Vs: Representatives of the broader paradigm of Kaplan (semantic, not meta-semantic) could reply:
The built-in two-dimensional frame in language allows us to express propositions which convey more direct statements on the world because
Secondary propositions: which are set by our thoughts and utterances, are singular propositions and propositions which express basic characteristics and relations. However:
primary propositions: they represent the cognitive values of our thoughts.
Secondary propositions/semantic//broader frame of Kaplan: based on him, the secondary propositions are described and not expressed. ((s) mentioned, not used/Mention/Use).
Secondary proposition/semantic: they are clearly set as a function of the facts.
Problem: we do not have a cognitive access to them.
Bsp Propositions, which we only know because of descriptions: "The sentence which is cited in Frank Jakson's "From Metaphysics to Ethics"on page 26, lines 3-4".
E.g. The content of the first sentence Napoleon spoke to Josephine after his coronation.
However: these propositions cannot be claimed by saying, e.g. "I hereby claim the proposition which fulfills the following condition."
Secondary Proposition/semantic/Stalnaker: By semantically (not meta-semantically) interpreting the two-dimensional frame, the secondary propositions seem to be like these examples.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Empiricism Sellars Vs Empiricism
 
Books on Amazon
Rorty VI 205
SellarsVsEmpiricism, British/Rorty: Confusion of causal conditionality and justifiable reason.
Rorty I 194
QuineVsEmpiricism/SellarsVsEmpiricism/logical/Rorty: their legal doubts about the epistemic privilege: that certain assertions are used as reports of privileged ideas. Gavagai/Quine/Rorty: asks how the propositions of the natives can be distinguished in contingent empirical platitudes on the one hand and necessary conceptual truths on the other hand. For the natives it is enough to know which propositions are certainly true. They have no idea of conceptual, necessary truths.
I 195
Assertibility/Rorty: if assertions are justified by their being common and not by their nature of inner episodes it makes no sense to try to isolate privileged ideas.
I 196
Necessity/Quine/Rorty: necessary truth: equivalent to the fact that nobody had to offer an interesting alternative that could cause us to question it. Incorrigibility/Sellars/Rorty: until now nobody has proposed a viable method of controlling human behavior that could verify the doubt in this matter.
I 196/197
Truth/justified assertibility/Rorty: (Dewey). Sellars, Quine, Chisholm and many others have the intention of making truth more than this modest approach.
VI 219
RortyVsEmpiricism: contains nothing that would be worth a rescue. - - -
Sellars I XVII
To seem/to appear/Sellars: like Lewis and Chisholm: about how something appears to someone any error is in fact impossible! But VsLewis: by this the propositions do still not advance to the foundation of the justification.
Observation reports/SellarsVsEmpiricism/Sellars: seem to be able to build instead of the sense-data the foundation of justification.
Vs: they are not in the sense independent that they require no further knowledge.
Someone who always only responds with "This is green" does not express with it alone any knowledge. (> Thermometer). He has no position in the "logical space of reasons".
I XXI
SellarsVsLogical Empiricism/SellarsVsEmpirismus/Sellars: the special wit his criticism is that the experiences of the minute taking persons that should constitute the basis of the theory in logical empiricism, are reconstructed by him as quasi theoretical postulated entities of an everyday world view.
I XXII
Sellars: (different than Wittgenstein and Austin): Connection between questions of classical philosophy and everyday language.
Sellars I 54
Elementary word-world connections are made between "red" and red physical objects and not between "red" and a suspected class of private red single objects. (SellarsVsEmpiricism). This does not mean that private feelings are maybe not an essential part of the development of these associative connections.

Sell I
W. Sellars
Der Empirismus und die Philosophie des Geistes Paderborn 1999

Ro I
R. Rorty
Der Spiegel der Natur Frankfurt 1997

Ro II
R. Rorty
Philosophie & die Zukunft Frankfurt 2000

Ro III
R. Rorty
Kontingenz, Ironie und Solidarität Frankfurt 1992

Ro IV
R. Rorty
Eine Kultur ohne Zentrum Stuttgart 1993

Ro V
R. Rorty
Solidarität oder Objektivität? Stuttgart 1998

Ro VI
R. Rorty
Wahrheit und Fortschritt Frankfurt 2000
Endurantism Lewis Vs Endurantism
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 32
Def Endurantism/Schwarz: (Vs Perdurantism): Thesis: Things are present as a whole (and not in parts) at all times in which they exist (like Aristotelian universalia). LewisVsEnduantism (instead: Mosaic theory).
Mosaic/Lewis: Thesis: All truth about our world as well as the temporal expansion of things are based on characteristics and relations between spatial-temporal expanded points.
Endurantism VsLewis: This is not argument for him since he is not interested in mosaic theory.
LewisVsEndurantism: better argument: intrinsic change: If normal things do not have temporal parts, but exist at different times, they can be neither round nor big, but only round in t. And this would be absurd.
Characteristics/some authors: surely, not all characteristics are relational like "to be far away", but they can at least be relational in time, although we ignore this perpetual present dependence. (Haslanger 1989:123f, Jackson 1994b,142f, van Inwagen 1990a, 116).
Characteristics/Lewis: (2004,4) at least abstract geometric objects can simply be round, therefore "round" is not a general relation to time.
Characteristics/Endurantism/Johnston: Thesis: not only characteristics, but their instantiations should be relativized in the area of time. (Johnston, 1987,§5)
e.g. I am now sitting, and was sleeping last night.
Others: (Haslanger, 1989): Thesis: Time designations (> time) are adverbial modifications of propositions, e.g. I am now sitting this way, and was sleeping this way last night.
LewisVsJohnston/LewisVsHaslanger: This is not a great difference. These representatives deny as well that form characteristics arrive to the things in a direct, simple way and on their own.
Perdurantism/Endurantism/Schwarz: The debate has reached a dead end, both parties accuse the other of analyzing transformation away.
Endurantism: To instantiate incompatible characteristics has nothing to do with transformation.
Perdurantism: Temporal instantiation, e.g. straight for t1, bent for t0, shall not be a transformation.
Schwarz: Both goes against our intuition. Transformation is attributed too much importance.
Schw I 33
Perdurantism/Schwarz: pro: Intrinsic transformation is no problem for presentism since the past is now only fiction, but the following should make temporal parts attractive for the presentist as well: the surrogate four-dimensionalist needs to construct his ersatz times differently. Instead of primitive essences which surface in strictly identical different ersatz times, temporal ersatz parts could be introduced which will form the essences, and on their associated characteristics it will depend on whether it is an ersatz Socrates or not (as an example). Part/LewisVs Endurantism: can also be temporal in everyday's language, e.g. a part of a film or a soccer game. E.g. part of a plan, parts of mathematics: not spatial. It is not even important whether the language accepts such denotations. Temporal would also exist if we could not designate them.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Endurantism Stalnaker Vs Endurantism
 
Books on Amazon
I 135
Vague identity/time/possible world/poss.w./Stalnaker: I ask with some examples for temporal and for cross world identity whether Salmon refuted vague identity with his argument. E.g. in Philadelphia, there are two prominent fish restaurants named "Bookbinder's". They compete with each other.
B1: "Bookbinder’s classic fish restaurant"
B2: "The old original Bookbinder's".
B0: The original, only restaurant from 1865.
Today's two restaurants may go back to the old and have a entangled history.
Question: does Salmon's argument show,
I 136
that there must be a fact (about the history) that decides on which restaurant is the original? One thing is clear: B1 unequal B2.
Transitive identity/transitivity/Stalnaker: then due to the transitivity of the identity B0 = B1 and B0 = B2 cannot exist at the same time.
Semantic indeterminacy/Stalnaker: but one is tempted to say that there is a certain semantic indeterminacy here.
Question: can we reconcile this with Salmon's argument (SalmonVsVague identity)?
Stalnaker: I think we can do so.
Perdurantism/perduration/Stalnaker: e.g. if we say the name "B0" dates back to the time of 1865 when there was a certain restaurant "Bookbinder's" this is the most natural way.
Endurantism/enduration/Stalnaker: e.g. but we can also say B0 is one of the today existing two restaurants "Bookbinder’s".
StalnakerVsEndurantism.
Endurantism/Stalnaker: here it is similar to vague descriptions: example "B0" is ambiguous! It is unclear whether he refers to B1 or to B2. (Indefinite reference).
Perdurantism/Stalnaker: here the reference is clear. ((s) Because the original restaurant does not exist anymore. B0 therefore clearly means the original restaurant because it cannot be confused with one of the two today existing) Also, of course "B1" and "B2" are unambiguous.
Question: given Salmon's argument: how can it then be indefinite if B0 = B2?
Stalnaker: that just depends on if we understand continuants as endurant or perdurant.
continuant/perdurantism/endurantism/Stalnaker:
Perdurantism/Stalnaker: can understand continuants e.g. as four-dimensional objects (four dimensionalism) which are extended in time exactly as they are extended in space. Then the example of the restaurants corresponds to the example of buildings (see above).
Example buildings: the indeterminacy is there explained by the indeterminacy of the concept "building". One building is maybe a part of another.
Example restaurants: according to this view each has a temporal part in common with the original. It is indeterminate here which of the temporal parts is a restaurant and which is a composition of multiple temporal parts of different restaurants.
I 137
Therefore, it is indefinite to which of these different entities "B0" refers (indefinite reference). Perdurantism/continuant/Stalnaker: one might think, but we have a specific reference, like in the example of the building through a demonstrative with a ostension: when we say "this building". But that does not work with the perdurantistic conception of restaurants. ((s) As an institution, not as a building. This should be perdurant here that means not all temporal parts are simultaneously present and anyway not as material objects).
Four dimensionalism/Stalnaker: therefore has two possible interpretations: perdurantistic (here) and endurantistic (see below).
Endurantism/four dimensional/four dimensionalism/continuant/Stalnaker: some authors: thesis: continuants have no temporal parts like events. That means they are at any moment with all their (only spatial) parts present. Nevertheless, they exist in time.
LewisVsEndurantism: (Lewis 1986a, 203) this view uses the terms "part" and "whole" in a very limited sense.
StalnakerVsLewis: that may not be quite so because the representatives acknowledge that some things e.g. football matches, wars, centuries indeed have temporal parts.
Endurantism/Stalnaker: even if the whole thing is an obscure doctrine some intuitions speak for it. I will neither defend nor fight him.
Endurantism: example restaurants:
In 1865 there is only one restaurant "Bookbinder's" there are no other candidates for this description. Even if our criterion for "restaurant" is unclear.
It seems that we have a definite reference for an endurant thing B0.
Also for the today existing restaurant B1 we seem to have definite reference.
Salmon/Stalnaker: if we accept his argument again, there must then be a fact which decides whether B0 is identical to B1 or not?
StalnakerVs: here the semantic indeterminacy may be subtle but it still exists. We show this like that:
Identity in time/Stalnaker: example statue/clay: yesterday there was the pile, today the statue, so both can not be identical. They have different historical properties. This known argument does not require four dimensionalism.
Four dimensionalism/statue/clay/Stalnaker: statue and pile as four dimensional objects: here only parts of them exist today.
Endurantism/statue/clay/Stalnaker: if we say both - Statue and pile - are at today "fully present" (it would have to be explained how) Salmon's argument still shows that both are (now) different. The argument does not depend on the fact that they have different parts. It requires only that they have different historical properties.
Endurantism/Stalnaker: example restaurants: suppose the concept Restaurant is indefinite. After some arbitrary clarifications B0 = B1 will be, after others B0 = B2.
Disambiguation/Stalnaker: then B0 has after some disambiguations temporal properties it would not have after other disambiguations.
Semantic indeterminacy/reference/StalnakerVsSalmon, Nathan: the reference of "B0" is then dependent on the way of our arbitrary assumptions for disambiguation.
SalmonVsStalnaker/Stalnaker: accuses me of some inconsistencies but I have shown indeterminacy of reference while Salmon refers to indeterminacy of identity between certain objects.

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Ersatz World Lewis Vs Ersatz World
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 69
Linguistic Ersatzism/Schwarz: LewisVs: If possible worlds (poss.w.)are a set of propositions, why is the actual world not a set of propositions? (1973b,16,90)
Schw I 70
VsVs: Because it is ersatzism which actually denies that things of the same form are like the actual world.(> ersatz worlds) LewisVs Ersatzism: natural languages do not have enough sentences at their disposal in order to build a poss.w. for each mode how a world could be:
Language/Infinity/Lewis: If propositions are finite chains of signs from a finite alphabet,there are at the utmost Aleph 1 of a set of propositions, as many as real numbers. But there are many more modes how a world could have been. (see above paragraph 3.2), at the least Aleph 2.(1973b,90,1986e, 143)
I 71
Possibilia/LewisVsErsatzism/Schwarz: 4. (Inhabitants of poss.w.): persistent problem: singular statements about them are something akin to descriptions [Kennzeichnungen]or open sentences in linguistic ersatzism. Problem: as such, things, which are described in exactly the same way, cannot be differentiated. ((s) e.g. A particles, which is different than above: we were talking about identical characteristics, not identical things.) e.g. two dragons may live in a symmetrical world which can be described in an identical way (as long as there are no haecceities). Then, descriptions are identical, but not the dragons. (1986e,157f).
VsErsatzism/linguistic/Lewis/Schwarz: 5. Not every set of propositions corresponds to a possibility, e.g. if Kripke necessarily is a human, and cannot be totally red and totally green at the same time, sets of propositions which state the contrary need to be excluded as well as sets in which the elements are incompatible.
E.g. particular propositions regarding the distribution of microphysical structures [mikrophysikalische Strukturen; MiSt] are incompatible with the statement that there is a donkey. Problem: How can this be determined without using modal terms, e.g. purely syntactical.
- - -
Stalnaker I 28
Ersatz World/LewisVsErsatzism/LewisVsModerate modal realism: This is why every moderate theory stumbles: it sees possible worlds as ways which represent the actualized [ersatz] world as a special one. This world shall be special because it is the only one to represent the concrete one. And as such it is shall not only be special from the own point of view, but from each and every one. So, not contingent special (extraordinary). ((s) Ersatz world/((s): an ersatz world is a set of propositions.) ((s) As such, it is necessary that the world has exactly the elements it has in the set, because if not, it would be a different set. It is not contingent that the set {0,1} (as an example)has the elements which it has. But it is contingent that the poss.w. has some of its objects.)
StalnakerVsLewis: The cursive sentence ("...from each and every [point of view]) is wrong. But this is a special fact about the actual world: it alone corresponds to the only concrete world. But this is a contingent fact, i.e. it is not even a fact from the point of view of other possible worlds.
Problem: Does it not mean that only from an objective point of view possible persons and their surroundings are as real as we are? Only if the objective or absolute point of view is identified with a neutral point of view outside of all possible worlds. Such a point of view does not exist.

I 29
Objectivity/absolute/Stalnaker: the absolute, objective point of view is the view from our actual world. Fiction: We concede that fictional characters have, from their point of view, exactly the same right to determine their reality, as we do. But their point of view is fictional.
Semantic thesis: Is the thesis that the deictic analysis of "actual" is the correct one.
Metaphysical thesis: defines that the actual world's actuality is nothing more than the relation between the actual world and the things that exist in it. The semantic thesis can therefore be accepted, and exclude any universes from the ontology.

- - -
I 63
…naturally, there are inconsistent sets of propositions. Metaphysics: Metaphysics cannot be obtained by calling such sets of propositions poss.w. ((s) > LewisVsErsatz Worlds).
Possible worlds/Louis: Our main contentious point is about the role of poss.w. in the explanations of possibility, and more generally, in the explanation of propositions and relations
Question: Should we analyze possible worlds with the terms of propositions or analyze them the other way round?
VsErsatz worlds/Lewis/Louis: We should not identify poss.w. with sets propositions, since I believe, that propositions are sets of possible worlds.
I 64
Content: It deals with a term of content which is not tied to modal realism. The starting point is the familiar idea that the intentional content of a sentence or a thought are the truth conditions (tr.cond.). [dabei geht es um einen Begriff von Inhalt, der gar nicht an den modalen Realismus gebunden ist. Ausgangspunkt ist der vertraute Gedanke, dass der intentionale Gehalt eines Satzes oder Gedankens die truth conditions (tr.cond.) sind.] tr. cond.: are the ways how the world should be in order for the sentence to be true. It is known what the sentence means if it is known which poss.w. makes it true and which one does not.
Possible/Possibility/Louis: If one has a term of a possible world which, if realized, would render the proposition true, then it will be shown that the proposition is possible.
Then the following will be true,regardless which metaphysics one follows:
Modal operator/Quantification/Louis: If there is one domain of all poss.w., all the modal operators can be interpreted in terms of unrestricted quantification in this domain. Necessity is truth in all poss.w., possibility in at least one.
metaphysical necessary/metaphysical possibility/Lewis/Louis/Stalnaker: this is what I mean when I say "metaphysical possible". (Quantification of the set of all poss.w.)
This is also possible with unrestricted quantification without ruining the terms "possible", "could", etc.
Restriction: It should be known what the basis of the restriction should be.
Impossible world/imposs.w./LouisVsImpossible world: In any case the conclusion will inevitable come that at least some impossible statements are impossible because they are not true in any poss.w. And this because of compositionality, which you will surely agree to as well. This is why there are propositions that are neither true in all the poss.w. nor in all the impossible worlds.
Possibility/Error/Not knowing[Unwissen]/Louis: Naturally,one can be wrong what is possible in this unrestricted sense. One can also be wrong whether a possibility has been rightly conceived.
Solution: Statements complexly represent possibilities.
I 65
As such, it is possible to discover that a proposition is impossible. It would be wrong to state that a term creates a situation that renders a statement true, and then judge afterwards that this sort of situation does not fulfill a metaphysical condition.


LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Extensionalism Verschiedene Vs Extensionalism Lewis IV 256
Lewis: ich weiß wirklich nicht, was der Intensionalist (I) Vs Extensionalismus (E) sagen soll! Ich kenne mehrere unbefriedigende Argumente. ("I" im englischen Text auch für "ich, Lewis") (vergeblich) Vs Extensionalismus: 1. man könnte sagen, der Extensionalismus ist komplizierter. Er braucht zwei Kategorien mehr und einen Lexikon Gegenstand mehr.
VsVs: das ist aus zwei Gründen schlecht:
a) Extensionalität selbst ist allgemein als wichtige Dimension von Einfachheit angesehen.
b) ich stimme mit E überein, dass ein vollständiger Zugang auch die Pause des Sprechers am Anfang des Satzes berücksichtigen muss. Das hat E bereits mit seiner Syntax und Semantik getan! Der Intensionalist muss dafür noch einen Platz finden.
(vergeblich) Vs Extensionalismus: 2. man könnte einwenden, dass es gegen unser Paradigma geht, dass Extensionen geteilt werden müssen: Bsp "Boston" benennt einfach Boston und nicht statt dessen eine Funktion von Indices.
Problem: dieses Paradigma gilt für Englisch, Polnisch, Deutsch, usw. aber nicht unbedingt für unerforschte Eingeborenensprachen.
Selbst wenn der Intensionalist vermutete, dass die Sprache sehr verwandt mit unserer ist, kann man nicht erwarten, dass E zustimmt, dass die Paradigmen anwendbar sind! Denn E und I sind sich nicht einig, welche Sprache die ihre ist!
Tarskis Konvention W: hilft hier nicht: denn die Eingeborenensprache entspricht ja nun mal nicht übrigens nicht unkontrovers unserer Metasprache ihrer Sprache. Daher sind die einzigen Versionen dieser Prinzipien die anwendbar sind, in Übersetzungen dieser Begriffe konstatiert.
Bsp E und I können übereinstimmen, dass ein metasprachlicher Satz der Form
"__ benennt ___ in ihrer Sprache" oder
IV 256/257
"__ ist ein Name, der __ als Extension in ihrer Sprache hat" wahr sein sollte, wann immer die erste Leerstelle mit einem Namen (in unserer Sprache) mit einem Namen  der Eingeborenensprache gefüllt wird und die zweite mit einer Übersetzung von  in unsere Sprache.
Aber das führt uns nirgends hin, weil wir uns überhaupt nicht über Namen einig sind und darüber, was ihre korrekten Übersetzungen sind!
(vergeblich) Vs Extensionalismus: 3. ich könnte einzuwenden versuchen, dass die Eingeborenensprache nicht extensional sein kann, weil in ihr einige Schlussfolgerungsmuster ungültig sind, die in jeder extensionalen Sprache gültig sind.
Bsp Identität: Inferenzen mit Leibniz’scher Identität (Leibniz’ Gesetz) oder Existenzgeneralisation führen in der Eingeborenensprache von wahren Prämissen zu falschen Konklusionen.
Extensionalist/VsLewis: sollte zustimmten, dass Leibniz’ Gesetz in jeder extensionalen Sprache Wahrheit erhält und dass sie nicht in meinen Gegenbeispielen (welchen?) bewahrt wird.
Aber er sollte nicht zustimmen, dass solche Inferenzen Fälle von Leibniz‘scher Identität sind!
Identität/Leibniz/Lewis: eine Inferenz mit Leibniz’ Gesetz braucht eine Identitätsprämisse und wie soll man die identifizieren? Nicht indem man drei oder vier horizontale Linien betrachtet!
semantisch: ein Ausdruck mit zwei Lücken drückt Identität aus, dann und nur dann, wenn 1. das Ergebnis des Einsetzens von Namen in die Lücken ein Satz ist,
2. der so gebildete Satz wahr ist, wenn die Namen koextensiv sind, sonst falsch.
Def Identitätsprämisse: ist ein Satz, der so gebildet wird.
Problem: da E und I nicht einig sind darüber, welches die koextensiven Namen sind, sind sie sich auch nicht einig darüber, welches die Ausdrücke sind, die Identität ausdrücken, welche Sätze die Identitätsprämissen sind und welche Inferenzen echte Instanzen von Leibniz’ Gesetz sind.
Wir ignorieren hier die Meinungsverschiedenheit, ob ein Satz S von einer Pause  eingeleitet werden muss, um überhaupt ein Satz zu sein. Genau gesagt, wenn " ,/also  " eine nicht wahrheitserhaltende Inferenz in Li ist, dann ist " ,/ also  " eine nicht wahrheitserhaltende Inferenz in Le. Die Originalversion ohne  ist überhaupt keine Inferenz in Le, weil ihre "Prämissen" und "Konklusionen" S Namen sind und keine Sätze.
((s) extensionale Sprache/(s): wie ist sie überhaupt möglich, wenn keine Prädikate (Eigenschaften) zugelassen sind - fällt dann nicht die Form Subjekt Prädikat überhaupt aus?)
Vs: die Form ist dann: a ist ein Element der Menge B.
(vergeblich) VsExtensionalismus: 4. ich könnte ad hominem argumentieren, dass E der Intensionalität nicht wirklich entronnen ist, weil die Dinge, die er als Extensionen nimmt, intensionale Entitäten sind.
Funktionen von Indizes zu Wahrheitswerten (WW) werden normalerweise mit Propositionen identifiziert (besonders, wenn die Indizes aus möglichen Welten und wenig mehr bestehen).
Und diese Funktionen werden gleichermaßen mit Individualbegriffen identifiziert. Wie können solche intensionale Entitäten dann Extensionen sein?
LewisVsVs: das ist nur eine Verwechslung! Intensionshaftigkeit ist relational!
((s) Es hängt von der Betrachtung ab, ob etwas eine Intension oder Extension ist).
Intensionen sind Dinge ((s) Entitäten), die eine bestimmte Rolle in der Semantik spielen und nicht Dinge einer bestimmten Sorte.
E und I stimmen darin überein, dass in einer geeigneten Sprache dasselbe Ding, das die Intension eines Ausdrucks ist, auch die Extension eines anderen ist.
Bsp wenn wir in einem Fragment von technischem Englisch sprechen, das als Metametasprache eines kleineren Fragments geeignet ist, stimmen wir darin überein, dass ein und dasselbe Ding beides ist, die Intension des Ausdrucks in der Objektsprache "mein Hut"
IV 258
und die Extension des metasprachlichen Ausdrucks "Intension von "mein Hut" ". ((s) Dasselbe Ding, nicht derselbe Ausdruck).
Lewis: das Ding selbst ist weder Extension noch Intension.
Wahr ist, dass einige Entitäten nur als Extensionen dienen können, während andere Funktionen von Indices z.B. als beides dienen können.
Aber es gibt kein Ding, das von sich aus ungeeignet wäre, eine Extension zu sein.
Ontologie/ (vergeblich) Vs Extensionalismus: 5. man könnte meinen, dass der Extensionalist den Eingeborenen eine extravagante Ontologie zuschreibt:
Bsp wenn der Intensionalist sagt, ein Wort der Eingeborenen benennt einen konkreten materiellen Berg, dann sagt E, er benenne etwas mehr esoterisches: ein mengentheoretisches Objekt, gebildet aus einem Bereich von Individuen, der unverwirklichte Möglichkeiten einschließt.
Aber auch E und I glauben an esoterische Dinge, wenn sie sich nicht selbst widersprechen wollen. Wir zweifeln nicht daran, dass wir sie benennen können.
Wir sind uns nämlich einig, dass die Eingeborenen Namen für noch weiter hergeholte Dinge wie z.B. Götter (gemäß dem Intensionalisten) oder Funktionen von Indices auf solche Götter (gemäß dem Extensionalisten) haben.
Ontologie/Vs Extensionalismus: ich sollte vielleicht besser argumentieren, dass bestimmte unesoterische Dinge fehlen!
Ontologie/Kripke: (gesprächsweise, 1972): es ist falsch, jemand eine Ontologie zuzuschreiben, die Mengen ohne Elemente enthält oder Funktionen ohne Argumente und Werte usw.
LewisVsVs: das ist ein plausibles Prinzip. Aber hat E es verletzt wenn er sagt, die Namen der Eingeborenen seien Funktionen von Indices und keine Namen von konkreten Dingen? Ich denke nicht.
Die zugeschriebene Ontologie ist nicht dasselbe wie die zugeschriebene Menge der Namens Träger. Bsp wenn unserer Sprache eine Ontologie zugeschrieben wird, enthält sie alle natürlichen Zahlen, nicht nur die kleine Minderheit von ihnen, die tatsächlich Namen tragen!
Es ist nicht signifikant, dass die Menge der Namen Träger Kripkes Schliessungs-Prinzip (closure) verletzt, außer wenn gezeigt werden kann, dass das die Gesamtheit der zugeschriebenen Ontologie ist. Aber es ist schwer zu sagen, welche Ontologie, wenn überhaupt eine, durch den Gebrauch von Le zugeschrieben wird.
Man sollte sich den Bereich der Quantoren anschauen, aber Le hat überhaupt keine Quantoren!
Quantoren: bilden Sätze. Aber in Le macht das nur das Prädikat  und das ist kein Quantor.
Anders die Transformation Lp von Parsons: sie hat einen Bereich. Die Menge D, so dass wir intendierte Wahrheitsbedingungen für die Sätze von Lp bekommen, die die Sätze von Li transformieren, dann und nur dann, wenn D eingeschlossen ist im Bereich der gebundenen Variablen.
(Das setzt voraus, dass die Prädikate von Lp intendierte Interpretationen haben).
Die Menge D ist dieselbe wie die Menge der Extensionen von Ausdrücken in Le. Sie verletzt Kripkes Schliessungs-Prinzip ((s) dass keine leeren Mengen zugeschrieben werden sollen, s.o.), deswegen kann sie niemand als Ontologie zugeschrieben werden. ((s) weil es eben in Le keine gebunden Variablen gibt.).
D.h. wenn ein Extensionalist behauptet, der Eingeborene spräche Lp, verschleiert durch Transformationen, haben wir ein Mittel gegen ihn.
Aber E selbst vertritt das nicht!
Vielleicht kann man zeigen, dass, wenn es schlecht ist, den Gebrauch von Lp zuzuschreiben,
IV 259
dass es dann auch schlecht ist, den Gebrauch von Le zuzuschreiben? Aber das sehe ich noch nicht.




Fine, Kit Lewis Vs Fine, Kit
 
Books on Amazon
V 43
Kit FineVsLewis/VsA 2: e.g. the counterfactual conditional (co.co) "If Richard Nixon had pushed the button, there would have been a nuclear holocaust."["Wenn Nixon den Knopf gedrückt hätte, hätte es einen nuklearen Holocaust gegeben"] is true or can be imagined as being true. According to Lewis' analysis the co.co. is then probably wrong because by imagining just a slight change in reality, the effects will not exist. [ist wahr oder kann als wahr vorgestellt werden. Nach Lewis Analyse ist das KoKo dann wahrscheinlich falsch. Denn wir müssen uns nur einen kleinen Wechsel in der Realität vorstellen, der die Folgen außer Kraft setzt.] LewisVsFine: Surely the event or not of an atomic holocaust will strongly contribute to a basing relation or not [sicher trägt das Vorliegen oder Nichtvorliegen eines atomaren Holocausts stark zu einer Ähnlichkeits- oder Unähnlichkeitsrelation bei.]
But the similarity relation (s.r.) which rules over the co.co. is not one of those! Still, s.r. can be a relation for similarity everywhere, but not because it determines explicit judgments, rather because it is a result of many single similarity relations according to particular priorities of evaluation. [regiert, ist keine von diesen! Sie kann dennoch eine Relation für Ähnlichkeit überall sein, aber nicht, weil sie explizite Urteile regiert, sondern eher weil es nach gewissen Prioritäten der Gewichtung ein Resultat vieler einzelner similarity relations ist.]
V 44
w0: e.g. Nixon pushed the button at the time t. w0. This can but does not need to be in our actual world. This world could have deterministic laws, and the world is sufficient for our darkest visions of buttons that are pushed. A nuclear holocaust happens because all connections of the button do work. [kann, muss aber nicht unsere wirkliche Welt (WiWe) sein. Sie habe deterministische Gesetze und sie genügt unseren finstersten Visionen über gedrückte Knöpfe. Ein nuklearer Holocaust tritt ein, weil die Verbindungen des Knopfes alle funktionieren.] There are now all possible worlds where Nixon pushes the button, but those worlds are different from our actual world. Which world resembles our the most? Some are simply squib loads or the missile is simply filled with confetti.
e.g. w1: w1 is exactly like w0 until shortly before t. In the last moment both worlds diverge: In w1 the deterministic laws of w0 are violated.
Lewis: Supposing a minuscule little miracle happens: Maybe some extra neurons in Nixon's brain. As a result, Nixon pushes these extra neurons. The holocaust happens. As such, both worlds are quite different from each other, at least regarding the surface of the planet. ((s) It was only counterfactual in w0 : If he pushes, the holocaust would happen.)
Lewis: so w1 is sufficient for analysis 1 (asymetry by postulate.) (We assume that we are in w0.) It should appear that worlds, like w1 in the basing relation, have more resemblance than all the other worlds in which Nixon would have pushed the button.
[Es sollte sich herausstellen, dass Welten, wie w1 unter der gesuchten ÄR ähnlicher sind als alle anderen Welten, in denen Nixon den Knopf gedrückt hätte.]
Miracle/Lewis: I simply mean the violation of laws of nature. But the violated laws are not in the same world! This would be impossible!
V 45
Miracle: Relation between possible worlds because the laws of a single world are not violated! w2: A second class of candidates of worlds that resemble w0 the most: without any miracle, the deterministic laws of w0 are followed exactly.
Difference to w0: Nixon pushes the button.
Determinism: After this, both worlds are either always or never the same. This is why both are never exactly the same for any period of time. They are even different in the past of a long time ago. [ Sie differieren sogar in der entfernten Vergangenheit.]
Problem: It cannot be stated what can be done in order to make the difference in recent past disappear. It is difficult to imagine how two deterministic worlds an actually be only slightly different over a long period of time. There is too much probability for small differences, which become a big sum.
[man kann nicht sagen, was man tun sollte, um die Unterschiede in der frühen Vergangenheit verschwinden zu lassen. Man kann sich einfach schwer vorstellen, wie zwei deterministische Welten sich überhaupt über längere Zeit nur wenig unterscheiden sollten. Es gibt zu viel Wschk für kleine Differenzen, die sich zu großen summieren.]
Naturally, worlds like w2 are not the most similar world for a world w0 in which Nixon pushes the button. This would lead to infinite backwards arguments.
[sind Welten wie w2 nicht ähnlichste Welten zu einer Welt w0, wo Nixon drückt. Das würde zu Rückwärts Argumenten ohne Ende führen.]
Bennett: co.co. would also be rendered senseless. We do not know enough to know which of them would be true.
To conclude: what we learn by comparing w1 to w2: in the basing relations, a small miracle is needed in order to have a perfect concordance of single facts.
w3: begins like w1: w3 is exactly like w0 until shortly before t. Then a small miracle happens, Nixon pushes the button, but there is no war!
This is because a second small miracle happens immediately after the push. It can as localized as the first one. The fatal signal is erased. Still, Nixon's action has left its marks: his fingerprints on the button, an empty bottle of gin, etc.
V 46
There are numerous differences between w3 and w0, but no one is particularly important. w3: There is more than only small differences, e.g. Nixon's memoirs have no influence on later generations, etc.
But even if it is unclear whether the differences will have strong repercussions it is not important.
[Aber selbst wenn es nicht sicher ist, dass sich die Unterschiede sehr stark auswirken, macht das nichts.]
- - -
Schwarz I 51
Counterfactual Conditional/co.co./FineVsLewis: His analysis clearly gives wrong results even with our vague intuitive similarity standards, e.g. "If Richard Nixon had pushed the button, there would have been a nuclear war". Problem: A possible world, in which Nixon pushed the button and an atomic war was started, must then resemble our actual world more than a world, in which he pushed the button, the mechanism failed and nothing happened. But an undestroyed world should surely have more similarities with our world? LewisVsFine: Here wrong resemblance criteria were used. The important categories are those in which his analysis is proven correct. hier wurden falsche Ähnlichkeitskriterien gebraucht. Die richtigen Kriterien sind nämlich die, unter denen seine Analyse sich als korrekt erweist ("Inversion";"Umkehrung"): we need to find out what we now about truth and wrongness of the co.co. in order to ascertain whether we can find a sort of basing relation.[wir müssen sehen, was wir über die Wahrheit und Falschheit der KoKo wissen, um herauszufinden, ob wir eine Art Ähnlichkeitsrelation finden können.] (1979b,43, 1986f,211).
Lewis/Schwarz: this is why his theory of co.co. is more a frame for such theories. Analysis tells us which sort of facts make co.co. true, but it does not tell us for which specific conditionals in specific contexts they are.
[daher ist seine Theorie der co.co. eher ein Rahmen für solche Theorien. Die Analyse sagt uns, welche Art von Tatsachen co.co. wahr machen, aber nicht, welche Tatsachen das für bestimmte Konditionale in bestimmten Kontexten genau sind.]

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Fodor, J. Dennett Vs Fodor, J.
 
Books on Amazon
I 533
Cognitive Barrier/DennettVsMcGinn: the situation for the monkey is different than for us: he cannot even understand the question. He is not even taken aback! Neither Fodor nor Chomsky can cite cases of animals to which certain issues are a mystery. I 534 In reality, it is not as they represent it, a biological, but rather a pseudo-biological problem. It even ignores a biological fact: we can certainly find an intelligence scale among living beings.
Consciousness/DennettVsMcGinn: apart from issues that cannot be solved in the lifetime of the universe, our consciousness will develop in a way we cannot even imagine today.
I 570 Why do Chomsky and Fodor not want this conclusion? They consider the means to be unsatisfactory. If our minds are not based on sky hooks, but on cranes, they would like to keep that secret.
Meaning/Evolution/FodorVsDennett: E.g. eye of the frog: reports about meaning too vague if they do not distinguish between shadow and real fly. Dennett.
I 571
Meaning/Evolution/DennettVsFodor: where you simply cannot distinguish what was the selectioning environment, there is no truth in the question of what the eye really says. Material/Evolution/DennettVsFodor: the uncertainty that Fodor criticizes is in reality the material with which evolution works, its condition. (the "borderline cases").
I 571
Meaning/Meaning/Material/Evolution/DennettVsFodor: the view that there must be something in particular which the frog’s eye "means" is simple essentialism.
I Lanz 299
DennettVsFodor: denies Fodor’s assumption that intentional expressions actually denote existing personal states. Thus, Dennett denies their feature: Causal efficiency of intentional states (hence DennettVsLewis). - - -
Rorty I 279
DennettVsFodor/Rorty: two subjects can absolutely believe the same thing, although their respective processors do not even speak the same language. Accordingly, no conclusions are required from the propositions of the processors to the propositions which the subject believes. Unlike the "ideas" of the empiricists, the causal process does not need to comply with any conclusion chain, which justifies the opinions of the person. Explanations may have their private character, justification is public in as far as disagreements of different people on the functioning of their tricky minds neither refer nor should refer.

Den I
D. Dennett
Darwins gefährliches Erbe Hamburg 1997

Den II
D. Dennett
Spielarten des Geistes Gütersloh 1999

Ro I
R. Rorty
Der Spiegel der Natur Frankfurt 1997

Ro VI
R. Rorty
Wahrheit und Fortschritt Frankfurt 2000
Fodor, J. Ramsey Vs Fodor, J.
 
Books on Amazon
Schurz I 215
Carnap-Sentence/Carnap-Conditional/CS/CK/Verstärkung/verstärkt/Lewis/Schurz: (Lewis 1970, 83 85): Vorschlag, den CS zu verstärken: indem der Theorie unterstellt wird, sie würde implizit postulieren, dass die Referenz ihrer theoretischen Termini (TT) in der actual world eindeutig bestimmt sei. Pointe: damit wird der analytische Gehalt einer Theorie durch folgende lokale „Definitionen“ mit Hilfe bestimmter Kennzeichnungen der TT dargestellt:
Kennzeichnung als Definition/Lewis: Bsp τi bezeichnet das i-th term des eindeutigen n-Tupels von Entitäten, das in der actual world die Behauptung T(X1,...Xn) erfüllt. (1970.87f)
PapineauVsLewis: seine These, dass wissenschaftliche Theorien mit Existenz und Eindeutigkeitsbehauptungen für die Referenz der TT einhergehen, ist selbst dann zweifelhaft, wenn sie realistisch interpretiert wird. Instrumentalistisch: ist sie unhaltbar. (Papineau, 1996, 6,Fn 5).
Definition/SchurzVsLewis: Definition per Deskription (Beschreibung, Kennzeichnung) sind nicht vollwertig, sondern nur partiell, weil sie die Extension der TT nur in solchen möglichen Welten bestimmen, in denen die zugrundeliegende Existenz bzw. Eindeutigkeitsannahme erfüllt ist.
I 216
TT/FodorVsHolism: Vs semantic theory holism: die Bestimmung der Bedeutung der TT ist zirkulär. Def semantischer Theorienholismus/Schurz: These: die Bedeutung der TT wird durch die Bedeutung der Theorie bestimmt.
Lösung/Ramsey-Sntence/RS/CS/Schurz:
RS/CS/Holism/Bedeutung/Zirkel/Schurz: die Methode der Konjunktion von RS und CS ist die Lösung für den Vorwurf der Zirkularität von FodorVsHolismus.
a) Einerseits: ist wegen der Kompositionalität die Bedeutung von T(t1,...tn) durch die Bedeutung der TT (nebst der Bedeutung der anderen Begriffe von T) bestimmt,
b) Andererseits: folgt aus dem semantischen Theorienholismus, dass die Bedeutung der TT durch die Bedeutung der Theorie bestimmt ist.
FodorVs: das ist ein Zirkel
RamseyVsFodor/CarnapVsFodor: Lösung: der Ramsey Satz R(T) lässt sich verstehen, ohne eine unabhängige Bedeutungskenntnis der TT vorauszusetzen, und der CS bzw. die Lewis Definitionen fügen hinzu, die Bedeutung der TT liegt darin, jene Entitäten zu bezeichnen, die die Behauptung der Theorie erfüllen.
((s) Carnap-Sentence/Schurz/(s): besagt, dass die Bedeutung der TT in der Bezeichnung der Entitäten liegt, die die Theorie erfüllen.)

Rams I
F. P. Ramsey
The Foundations of Mathematics and Other Logical Essays 2013

Schu I
G. Schurz
Einführung in die Wissenschaftstheorie Darmstadt 2006
Folk Psychology Functionalism Vs Folk Psychology
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 147
analytischer Funktionalismus/Terminologie/Schwarz: so wird Lewis’ Position manchmal genannt, wegen der holistischen Charakterisierung. (Block, 1978, 271ff).
Schw I 148
„analytisch“: weil die Charakterisierung der kausalen Rollen bei Lewis analytisch sein soll. Wenn Funktionalismus aber als Vs Identitätstheorie verstanden werden soll, dann ist Lewis kein Funktionalist, sondern Identitätstheoretiker.
Standardeinwände Vs Funktionalismus betreffen Lewis auch gar nicht: Bsp mentale Zustände:
mentale Zustände/Lewis: für ihre Charakterisierung braucht es auch wesentlich Verbindung zur wahrgenommenen Umgebung usw. Deshalb besteht keine Gefahr, dass wir Bsp der chinesischen Volkswirtschaft Gefühle zuschreiben müssten. (>DennettVsSearle?).
Andererseits kommt es nicht nur auf Input Output Relationen an, so dass Maschinen, die sich zwar äußerlich verhalten wie wir, aber intern völlig anders sind (Bsp Blocks (1981) „Blockhead“, Searle: Bsp Chinese Room (1980), Wünsche, Schmerzen und Meinungen hätten (> Bsp Marsmenschenschmerz).
Schmerz/VsLewis/Vs Volkspsychologie: wenn wir wissen wollen, was Schmerz ist, sollten wir Schmerzforscher fragen und nicht den Mann auf der Straße.Theorie Theorie/Philosophie des Geistes/Schwarz: These: dass wir das Verhalten unserer Artgenossen mit Hilfe eines internalisierten Satzes an Regeln und Prinzipien interpretieren und nicht z.B.: durch mentale Simulation. Das wird Lewis völlig fälschlich zugeschrieben. Dieser hat sich dazu nie geäußert. Alltagspsychologie/Lewis: ist keine besondere „Theorie“. Sie setzt nur voraus, dass wir Meinungen und Erwartungen über mentale Zustände haben nicht unbedingt bewusste. (1997c: 333, früh: „Sammlung von Platituden“ (1972,§3).
LewisVs Psychologie: das wäre ein Wechsel des Themas. Wir wollen doch wissen, ob ein biologischer Zustand die Rolle spielt, die wir mit „Schmerz“ assoziieren.
Schw I 149
SchwarzVsLewis: der Gegensatz ist vielleicht weniger stark, manche Schmerzforscher könnten besser wissen, was Schmerz ist. Bsp Depression.

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Four-Dimensionalism Mellor Vs Four-Dimensionalism
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 25
Vierdimensionalismus/Lewis: Zeit Operator;: verschiebt den Bereich: Bsp „1642 gab es keine Kuckucksuhren“ ist wie Bsp „in Australien gibt es keine Kuckucksuhren“ Der Satz über 1642 ist wahr, wenn es in diesem Bereich (Teil der Realität) keine Kuckucksuhren gibt. Intrinsische Veränderung/Zeit/Vierdimensionalismus: Problem: Bsp ich mache den Satz wahr: „letzte Nacht lag jemand in meinem Bett“ aber ich sitze hier am Tisch.
Schw I 26
intuitive Antwort: (einige Vertreter): letzte Nacht geschlafen zu haben, ist doch gar nicht unverträglich damit, jetzt wach zu sein. Die Dinge scheinen nur unverträgliche Eigenschaften zu instantiieren, diese seien in Wirklichkeit bloß zeit relativ. Gegenstände, über die wir mit „letzte Nacht“ quantifizieren, sind an sich weder schlafend noch sitzend noch sonst etwas. Sie haben auch weder Form noch Farbe. Richtig: sie sind „wach zu t“ usw.
Eigenschaften: nach dieser Ansicht sind einfache Eigenschaften in Wirklichkeit Relationen zwischen merkwürdig eigenschaftslosen Dingen und Zeiten,
zeit-relative Eigenschaften/LewisVs: das ist inakzeptabel.
Form/Lewis: ist eine Eigenschaft und keine Relation!
Eigenschaften, intrinsisch/SchwarzVsLewis: dieser hat das Problem falsch benannt, es geht nicht um intrinsische, sondern um einstellige Eigenschaften.
Eigenschaften/Relation: Frage: ob Formprädikate ähnlich wie Bsp „berühmt“ und „fern“ verkappte Relationen ausdrücken. Es ist sinnlos ohne Bezug auf etwas zu sagen, jemand sei berühmt. Lewis: es ist aber wohl sinnvoll ohne Bezug auf etwas anderes zu sagen, etwas sei rot oder rund.
Intrinsische Veränderung/Lewis: Lösung: nach der Analogie von Zeit und Raum: Bsp eine lange Mauer ist an manchen Stellen hoch und rot, an manchen niedrig und grau. Als ganzes ist sie weder hoch noch niedrig, weder rot noch grau. Lösung: sie setzt sich eben einfach aus verschiedenen Teilen zusammen.
Schw I 27
Veränderung/Lewis: gewöhnliche Dinge haben zu verschiedenen Zeiten verschiedene Eigenschaften, indem sie aus Teilen mit jenen Eigenschaften zusammengesetzt sind. Identität/Zeit/zeitliche Identität/Lewis/Schwarz: Problem: dann sind vergangene Dinge nicht streng identisch mit jetzigen Dingen. Das früher schlafende und der jetzt hier sitzende Ding sind nicht strikt identisch. Die verschiedenen zeitlichen Teile sind doch verschiedene Dinge! (1976b,68,1986e:204)
MellorVsLewis: das ist absurd. Wenn wir von jemand reden, reden wir nicht von seinen Teilen.
LewisVsVs: Bsp sicher war der ganze Mensch Hillary auf dem Mt. Everest. Lösung: Hillary hat einen vergangenen zeitlichen Teil, der auf einem vergangenen Teil der Everest ist. Edmund Hillary als ganzes erfüllt diese Bedingung.
Problem: Bsp dann bin ich strenggenommen als ganzes weder wachend noch sitzend. Aber als ganzes bin ich deswegen nicht formlos.
Lewis/Lösung: ich habe eine komplexe vierdimensionale Form. Es gibt immer zeitliche Teile, die ignoriert werden.
Ich/Vierdimensionalismus/Lewis: “ich“ bezieht sich oft nur auf einen einzelnen zeitlichen Teil von mir.
Ted Sider: (1996,2001a. 188 208) hat das weiter ausgeführt: Namen beziehen sich immer auf zeitliche Teile. Ich heute Nacht war ein zeitliches Gegenstück (counterpart) von mir jetzt.

Mell I
D. H. Mellor
Properties (Oxford Readings in Philosophy) Oxford 1997

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Frege, G. Lewis Vs Frege, G.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 228
Predicate/Characteristic/SchwarzVsLewis/VsFrege: The assumption that for each predicate a name can be clearly allocated for a corresponding characteristic. But is nothing less than Frege's ominous axiom V(Frege 1893 1903,§20). RussellVsFrege: Russell's paradoxy. Some predicates, for example "_ is a characteristic that does not apply to itself" do not correspond to a characteristic. (>Heterology). Predicate/Characteristic/Lewis/Schwarz: In Lewis' metaphysics predicates as, for example, "_ is a class", "_ is a part of" and "is identical with _" do not correspond to anything that can be named with a singular term.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Functionalism Verschiedene Vs Functionalism Münch III 338
Funktionalismus/Holenstein: sein offensichtliche Grenze bezieht sich auf die phänomenalen Qualitäten. Phänomene sind funktional nicht identifizierbar. Es ist entscheidbar, ob die Eigenschaft eines Dings, die zwei Personen mit dem Farb-Adjektiv "rot" belegen, für sie funktional gleichwertig ist. Es ist jedoch unentscheidbar, ob beide die gleiche Farbe wahrnehmen.
James I 102
Vs Funktionalismus,Vs Pragmatismus: Der Begriff des Nutzens ist zirkulär und leer. "Alles, was für ein System nützlich ist" kann beliebig aufgefasst werden. Vs Pragmatismus: daß James Wahrheit mit Bewährung verwechsele: es kann niemals festgestellt werden, ob eine Beobachtung richtig übersetzt ist. (Basissatzproblem, auch Quine).
- - -
Schwarz I 155
Vs Rolle/VsLewis: besonderes Merkmal unserer mentalen Zustände ist ihre Vertrautheit. Wir identifizieren sie nicht über die kausalen Rollen. LewisVsVs: baut die Introspektion kurzerhand in die kausale Rolle ein. Zur kausalen Rolle bewusster Erfahrungen gehört, dass sie (unter geeigneten Umständen) Meinungen über ihr eigenes Vorliegen bewirken. (1966a, 103).





Mü I
D. Münch (Hrsg.)
Kognitionswissenschaft Frankfurt 1992

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Gadamer, G. Block Vs Gadamer, G.
 
Books on Amazon:
Ned Block
Avra I 149
Input/Output/BlockVsFunctionalism/BlockVsLewis: no matter how functionalism characterizes input and output, it leads into the dilemma of being either chauvinistic or liberal. ((s) liberal: attributing mind to too many systems (e.g. vending machines)/chauvinistic: too few: E.g.: deny animals mind).
I 150
Input/Output/BlockVsFunctionalism/VsLewis any physical characterization of inputs and outputs is inevitably chauvinist or liberal: E.g. assuming you were seriously injured and your only way to communicate with the outside world is through electroencephalogram patterns. If you find something exciting, it produces a pattern that the others interpret as a point, if it is a bit boring, a line. Now let us imagine, on the other hand, others communicate with you by creating electronic activity that leaves long or short afterimages in you. In this case, we could say that the brain itself has become a part of the inputs and outputs! (at the top we had determined variable realization as an essential progress, however). But: Block: if this point (of variable implementation) is correct VsMaterialism, it also applies to inputs and outputs, because the physical realization itself may be an essential part of the inputs and outputs. ((s) input output devices: receptors?). I.e. there is no physical characterization which refers on inputs and output of all and only mental systems. (Block 1980b, p.295). Conclusion/Block: any physical characterization of Inputs/Outputs is either chauvinistic or liberal.

Block I
N. Block
Consciousness, Function, and Representation: Collected Papers, Volume 1 (Bradford Books) Cambridge 2007
Grice, P.H. Jackson Vs Grice, P.H.
 
Books on Amazon:
Frank C. Jackson
Lewis V 153
Implicature/Conversational Implicature/Grice/Lewis: E.g. "This time you are right" Implicature: "Otherwise you are usually wrong."
Conventional Implicature/Jackson: E.g. "She votes liberal, but she's not an idiot" - "Most liberals are idiots".
Conditional/Grice/Lewis: if P(A>C) is high mainly because P(A) is low (E.g. falso quodlibet), then what sense does it make to say "If A, then B"? Why should you not say the stronger one: that it is almost as likely non-A?.
JacksonVsGrice/JacksonVsLewis: we often assert things that are much weaker than we could actually assert, and for good reason.
Hereby I suppose this that your belief system is similar to mine, but not identical.
E.g. Assuming you know something that strikes me as highly unlikely today, but I still want to say something useful. So I say something weaker, so that you can definitely take my word.
Def Robust/Jackson/Lewis: A is robust relative to B (in terms of one's subjective probability at a time), iff. the probability of A and probability of A conditional to B are close to each other and are both high.
V 154
so that if one learns that B, they still consider A probable. Jackson: the weaker thing can then be more robust with respect to something that you think is more unlikely, but that you do not want to ignore.
If it is now useless, the to say weaker thing, how useless is it then to say the weaker thing and the stronger thing together! And yet we do it!
E.g. Lewis: "Bruce sleeps in the clothes chest, or elsewhere on the ground floor".
Jackson: Explanation: it makes sense to assert the stronger thing, and just as much sense to assert the more robust thing. If they differ, we assert both.
Robustness/Indicative Conditional/IC/Lewis: an IC is a truth functional conditional, that conventionally implies robustness (convention implicature) with respect to the antecedent.
Therefore, the probabilities P(A>C) and P(A>C) must both be high.
That is the reason why the BH of the IC comes with the corresponding conditional probability.

Jack I
F. C. Jackson
From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis Oxford 2000
Haecceitism Lewis Vs Haecceitism
 
Books on Amazon
IV 140
Haecceitism/Possible World/poss.w./VsLewis: Followers of haecceity are not persuaded by the example of the two gods. Variant: e.g. 2 gods: both live in world W, two other gods live in world V, which differs from W because both gods have swapped their seats. [bewohnen beide die Welt W, zwei andere Götter bewohnen die Welt V die sie von W darin unterscheidet, dass die beiden die Plätze getauscht haben.]
The god on the highest mountain in W and the god on the coldest mountain in V are linked by a simple bond which somehow makes them one. (The same is valid for the other two.)
If the god on the highest mountain in W does not know whether he sits on the hightest or the coldest mountain, then he cannot know for sure which one of the worlds is his.
He may know everything about the qualitative state that can be known about his world, but he does not know whether his world is W or V! [Er kann alles Qualitative wissen, was es über seine Welt zu wissen gibt, aber nicht, ob seine Welt W oder V ist!]
If he knew, he would know every proposition that is valid in his world. But it seems that he does not know one proposition: The one which would correspond to the sentence "I sit on the highest mountain."
I/Haecceitism: If his pronoun "I" is accurate for both, his brother and him, in haecceitas on the coldest mountain, then the proposition is indeed valid in W, but not in V!
[wenn sein Pronomen "ich" auf beides, ihn und seinen Bruder in haecceitas auf dem Kältesten in V zutrifft, dann ist es in der Tat eine Proposition, die in W gültig ist, aber nicht in V!]
IV 141
If he were to know this proposition, would he then not know that he sits on the hightest mountain? 2 gods/LewisVsHaeccetism: I would love to discover what I should know about the objects of belief, and leave the followers of haeccetism to themselves. But I cannot resist to barge in. If you were a follower of haecceitism, I would recommend you to not believe the analysis written above. [ich würde ja gerne entdecken, was ich da über die Objekte des Glaubens wissen sollte und die Haecceitisten sich selbst überlassen. Aber ich kann nicht widerstehen, mich einzumischen: wenn Sie Haecceitist wären, würde ich ihnen raten, die obige Analyse schnell auszuspucken.]
Haecceitism or not, there is a kind of not knowing which cannot be healed by some sort of self-localization in the logical space.
[es gibt eine Art Unwissenheit, die nicht mit irgendeiner Selbstlokalisation im logischen Raum geheilt werden kann!]
e.g. supposing that both gods have swapped their places, and it shall be conceded that the god on the highest mountain knows that his world is W and not V!
He shall be all-knowing with regards to all propositions, not only the qualitative ones. Is this helpful?
Do not occupy yourself with V of which he knows that he does not live there.
Does he know the proposition: "I am on the highest mountain"? Naturally, he does!
He knows all the propositions, and this is one of them. Does he therefore know that he sits on the highest mountain?
No! Because this does not follow from it. Since he is the one on the highest mountain, his sentence expresses a particular proposition which is true in W but not in V. It is one he knows to be true.
Had he been the god on the coldest mountain (which he could be for all he knows), the same sentence would have expressed a different proposition, one that is true in V and wrong in W. It would be one of which he knows that it is wrong.
He would know the proposition which would indeed by expressed by "I am on the highest mountain". But that does not mean that he knows whether he is on the highest mountain.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989
Hempel, C. Lewis Vs Hempel, C.
 
Books on Amazon
V 232
Probability/Explanation/Hempel/Lewis: is also offered by him for the probabilistic case; but this is different from his deductive-nomological model. LewisVsHempel: two unwelcome consequences:
1. an improbable case cannot be explained at all
2. a necessity of a correct explanation: "maximal specificity" : relative to our knowledge, i.e. not knowing (a case of probability) makes an explanation, which is actually true, not true. Truth is only that not knowing makes the explanation look untrue. [Wahr ist nur, dass sie sie unwahr erscheinen lässt.]
I prefer Peter Railton's model:
Probability/Explanation/Peter Railton/Lewis: "deductive-nomological model" "probabilistic explanation" (d.n.m.).
We must distinguish this model from Fetzer's model: for both
covering law/Raiton/Fetzer: universal generalizations about a single case are chances.
Explanation/Probability/FetzerVsRailton: as for Hempel: inductive, not deductive. Explanation: as an argument! LewisVsFetzer: but: a good explanation is not necessarily a good argument!
LewisVsFetzer/LewisVsRailton: both want an explanation even if the event is very improbable. But in this case a good explanation is a very bad argument.
V 233
Probability/Explanation/Covering Law Model/Railton:two parts: 1. one deductive-nomological argument which fulfills some conditions of the non-probabilistic case. Laws of probability may also be a part of its premises.
2. does not belong to the argument: The finding that the event took place.
If the premises say that certain events took place, then those are sufficient if taken together - given the laws - for the actual event or for the probability.[Wenn die Prämissen sagen, dass gewisse Ereignisse stattgefunden haben, dann sind diese zusammen hinreichend - gegeben die Gesetze - für das eigentliche Ereignis oder für die Wschk.]
Problem: a subset - given only a part of the laws- can be sufficient as well in explaining parts of the events, and in creating a number of remains which are still sufficient under the original laws. [eine Teilmenge - gegeben auch nur ein Teil der Gesetze - kann ebenfalls hinreichend sein, Teile der Ereignisse zu erklären, und eine Anzahl Überbleibsel hervorbringen, die immer noch hinreichend unter den Originalgesetzen sind.] THis is why there must be two conditions for the explanation:
1. certain events are sufficient when taken together for the event of the explanandum (under the prevailing laws)
[dass gewisse Ereignisse zusammen hinreichend sind für das Explanandum Ereignis (unter den herrschenden Gesetzen)]
2. only some of the laws are used to guarantee that the conditions are sufficient
LewisVsRailton: If we had covering law [Begleitgesetz] for causation, and our covering law for explanation, my approach would be reconciled with the c1-approach.
But this cannot be achieved!
V 233/234
An element of the d.n.m.'s sufficient reasons will in reality often be one of the causes. But this cannot be! The counterexamples are well-known: 1. an irrelevant reason can be a part of the sufficient subset, the requirement of minimality is not helping: We can create artificial minimality by taking weaker laws and disregarding stronger ones.
e.g. Salmon: A man takes the (birth control) pill, and does not end up pregnant! The premise that nobody who takes the pill will not become pregnant cannot be disregarded!
2. An element of sufficient subset could be something that is not an event:
e.g. a premise can assess that something as an extrinsic or highly disjunctive characteristic. But no true events can be specified.
3. An effect can be part of the subset if laws state that the effect can only be made to happen in a particular way. I.e.: the set could be conveniently minimal, and also be one of the events, but it would not be sufficient to make the effect the cause of its cause!
[Ein Effekt kann zur Teilmenge gehören, wenn die Gesetze sagen, dass er nur in bestimmter Weise hervorgebracht werden kann. D.h. die Menge könnte in geeigneter Weise minimal sein, und auch eine von Ereignissen sei, aber das wäre nicht hinreichend, den Effekt zur Ursache seiner Ursache zu machen!]
4. Such an effect can also be the sufficient subset for another effect, e.g. of a later effect of the same cause.[Ein solcher Effekt kann auch zur hinreichenden Teilmenge für einen anderen Effekt sein, z.B. eines späteren, derselben Ursache.]
E.g. an ad appearing on my TV is caused because of the same broadcast, like the same appearing on your TV. But one appearance is not the cause of the other ad, rather they happened due to the same cause. [Bsp dass ein Werbespot auf meinem Fernseher erscheint wird durch dieselbe Ausstrahlung verursacht, wie das Erscheinen desselben Spots auf Ihrem Fernseher, aber das eine ist nicht Ursache des anderen. Eher haben sie eine gemeinsame Ursache.]
5. an impeded potential cause may belong to a subset because nothing has overridden it. [eine verhinderte potentielle Ursache könnte zur Teilmenge gehören, weil nichts sie außer Kraft gesetzt hat.]
LewisVsRailton: This shows that the combined sufficient subset, presented by d.n.-arguments, is possibly not a set of causes.
V 235
LewisVsRailton: It is a problem for my own theory if a d.n. argument does not seem to show causes, but still seems to be an explanation. (see above, paragraph III,I. Three examples VsHempel: refractive index, VsRailton: no non-causal cases in reality. RailtonVsLewis: If the d.n. model presents no causes, and thereby does not look like an explanation, then it makes it a problem for said model.
Railton: This is why not every d.n. model is a correct explanation.
V 236
Question: Can every causal narration [Kausalgeschichte] be characterized by the information which is part of a deductive-nomological argument? It would be the case if each cause belongs to a sufficient subset, given the laws. Or for the probabilistic case: given the laws of probability. And is it that causes are included in them?[ Und ist das so, dass die Ursachen darunter fallen?]
Lewis: It does not follow from the counterfactual analysis of causality. But it could be true. (It will be true in a possible world with sufficiently strict laws.)
If explanatory information is information about causal narration, then the informaation is given by deductive-nomological arguments.
But there will still be something wrong! The deductive-nomological arguments are presented as being ideal, i.e. they have the right form, neither too much nor not enough.
But nobody thinks that daily explanation fulfills this. Normally, the best we can do is to make existence assumptions.
"Deshalb" Behauptung/Morton White: We can take it as existence assumptions.
LewisVsRailton: correct deductive-nomological arguments as existence assumptions are still not a true explanation. They do not meet the standard on how much information is sufficient, simply because of their form.
Lewis: There is always more to know if we collect deductive-nomological arguments, as perfect as they are. [es gibt immer noch mehr zu wissen, wenn wir noch so perfekte deductive-nomological arguments aufhäufen.] Deductive-nomological arguments only offer a profile of the causal narration. Many causes may be omitted. They could be the ones we are currently looking for. Maybe we would like to acquaint ourselves with the mechanism which were involved in particular traces of causal narration.
[geben immer nur einen Querschnitt der Kausalgeschichte. Viele Ursachen mögen weggelassen sein. Und diese könnte diejenigen sein, die wir gerade suchen. Vielleicht möchten wir gerade die Mechanismen kennen lernen, die in bestimmten Spuren der Kausalgeschichte involviert sind.]
V 238
Explanation/Lewis/VsRailton: a deductive-nomological argument can also be in the wrong form: to not give us enough of too much at the same moment. Explanation/Lewis: But we cannot actually say that we have a different conception of the explanation's unity. We should not demand a unity: An explanation is not a thing that one can have or fail at creating one, but something that one can have to a higher or lesser degree.
[dabei ist es nicht so, dass wir eine verschiedene Vorstellung von der Einheit der Erklärung haben. Wir sollten gar keine Einheit fordern: eine Erklärung ist kein Ding, das man haben kann oder verfehlen, sondern etwas, von dem man mehr oder weniger haben kann.]
Problem: The conception to have "enough" of an explanation: It makes us doubt our ancestors' knowledge. They never or rarely had complete knowledge about laws of nature.
LewisVsRailton: i.e. so, they never or rarely had complete deductive-nomological arguments. Did they therefore have incomplete explanatory knowledge. I do not think so! They know much about the causes of things.
Solution/Railton: (similarly to my picture): together with each explanandum we have a wide and complex structure.
V 239
Lewis: For me those structures are linked because of causal dependence. Railton: For him they consist of an "ideal text" of arguments, like in mathematical proofs.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Hume, D. Bigelow Vs Hume, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 226
Non-modal theory/Laws of Nature/LoN/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: most non-modal theories of the LON descended from Hume. Then we can assume nomic necessity to be a relative necessity without falling into a circle. Important argument: then we can just assume nomic necessity as a relative necessity and rely on it being based on an independent approach to laws! Explanation: So it makes sense to make use of laws to explain nomic necessity, rather than vice versa. And that’s much less obscure than modal arguments.
I 227
BigelowVsVs: modal explanations are not so mysterious. BigelowVsHume: Hume’s theories are unable to explain these non-modal properties of the laws, they have less explanatory power.
I 233
"Full generality"/"Pure" generality/Hume/BigelowVsHume/Bigelow/Pargetter: may not contain any reference to an individual: This is too weak and too strong: a) too strong: E.g. Kepler’s laws relate to all the planets, but therefore also to an individual, the sun. b) too weak: it is still no law. E.g. that everything moves towards the earth’s center.
I 235
LoN/BigelowVsHume/Bigelow/Pargetter: in our opinion, it has nothing to do with them, E.g. whether they are useful, or whether they contradict our intuitions. Counterfactual conditional/Co.co/LoN/Hume/Bigelow/Pargetter: for the Humean, Counterfactual Conditional are circular, if they are to represent LoN. We ourselves only use a Counterfactual Conditional when we have recognized something as a law! When we ask ourselves whether something is a law, we ask ourselves not whether it fulfils a Counterfactual Conditional.
I 236
HumeVsBigelow/Bigelow/Pargetter: our modal approach for LoN is circular. BigelowVsVs: it is not! BigelowVsHume: most of Hume’s theories of the LON are circular themselves, with one exception: the theory that Lewis reads out of Ramsey. Ramsey/Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: this theory is based on the logical relations of laws among each other (coherence). (Ramsey 1929, 1931, Lewis 1973a, Mellor 1980).
I 237
BigelowVsLewis/BigelowVsHume/Bigelow/Pargetter: Problem: if theories are sets of propositions, propositions must not be sets of possible worlds! For then the best theory for a possible worlds would have to be an axiom: the one-class of this possible worlds All facts of the world are then theorems of the axiom. There would be only one law for each world. No two possible worlds would have a law in common.
I 267
BigelowVsHume: went too far in his rejection of necessity in laws. But not far enough in his rejection of the necessity approach to causality.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Humean Supervenience Verschiedene Vs Humean Supervenience Schwarz I 114
Vs Humean Supervenienz/HS/VsLewis/Schwarz: schwerwiegender: Überlegungen, die zeigen sollen, dass nomologische und kontrafaktische Wahrheiten nicht auf der Verteilung lokaler Eigenschaften supervenieren. Angenommen, es gibt ein grundlegendes Naturgesetz, nach dem bei einem Zusammentreffen von X und Y Teilchen, stets ein Z Teilchen entsteht. Rein zufällig treffen X und Y Teilchen aber nie zusammen. Die Welt w1, in der dieses Naturgesetz (NG) existiert, sähe dann genau so aus, wie die Welt w2, in der es nicht existiert. Beide Welten stimmen in der Verteilung lokaler Eig überein. Aber sie unterscheiden sich in ihren NG und vor allem in ihren kontrafaktischen Wahrheiten. (In w1 entstünde bei einer Kollision ein Teilchen). (Tooley 1977m 669 671, 2003,§4,Armstrong 1983,§5.4, Carroll 1994,§3.1)





Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Inwagen, P. van Lewis Vs Inwagen, P. van
 
Books on Amazon
V 195
Individuation/Redundant Causation/Peter van Inwagen: Thesis: An event, which actually happens as a product of several causes, could not have happened had if it had not been the product of these causes. The causes could also not have led to another event.[ein Ereignis, das aktual passiert als Produkt mehrerer Ursachen, könnte nicht passiert sein, ohne das Produkt dieser Ursachen zu sein. Die Ursachen hätten auch kein anderes Ereignis zur Folge haben können.] Analogy to individuation of objects and humans because of their causal origins.
LewisVsInwagen:
1. It would ruin my analysis to analyze causation in terms of counterfactual dependence. ((s) Any deviation would be a different event, not comparable, no counterfactual conditionals applicable.) 2. It is prima facie implausible: I am quite able to legitimately establish alternative hypotheses how an event (or an object or a human being) was caused.
But then I postulate that it was one and the same event! Or that one and the same event could have had different effects.
(Even Inwagen postulates this.)
Plan/LewisVsInwagen: implies even more impossibilities: Either all my plans or hypotheses are hidden impossibilities or they do not even deal with particular event. [entweder sind meine ganzen Pläne oder Hypothesen versteckte Unmöglichkeiten, oder sie handeln gar nicht von einem bestimmten Ereignis.]
- - -
V 296
Vs weak determinism/VsCompatibilism/van InwagenVsLewis: (against wD which I pretend to represent): e.g. Suppose of reductio that I could have lifted my left hand although determinism would be true.
Then follows from four premises, which I cannot deny, that I could have created a wrong conjunction HL from a proposition H of a moment in time before my birth, and a certain proposition about a law L.
Premise 5: If yes, I could have made L wrong.
Premise 6: But I could not have made L wrong. (Contradiction.)
LewisVInwagen: 5 and 6 are both not true. Which one of both is true depends on what Inwage calls "could have made wrong". However, not in everyday language, but in Inwagen's artificial language. But it does not matter as well what Inwagen means himself!
What matters is whether we can actually give sense to it, which would make all premises valid without circularity.
Inwagen: (oral) third meaning for "could have made wrong": only iff the actor could have arranged the things in such a way that both his action and the whole truth about the previous history would have implied the wrongness of the proposition.
Then premise 6 states that I could not have arranged the things in such a way to make me predetermined to not arrange them. [dass ich die Dinge nicht hätte so arrangieren können, so dass ich prädeterminiert war, sie nicht so zu arrangieren.]
Lewis: But it is not instructive to see that compatibilism needs to reject premise 6 which is interpreted that way.
V 297
Falsification/Action/Free Will/Lewis: provisory definition: An event falsifies a proposition only when it is necessary that the proposition is wrong when an event happens. But my action to throw a stone is not going to falsify the proposition that the window which is on the other end of the trajectory will not be broken. The truth is that my action creates a different event which would falsify the proposition.
The action itself does not falsify a law. It would only falsify a conjunction of antecedent history and law.
The truth is that my action precedes another action, the miracle, and the latter falsifies the law.
[Alles was wahr ist ist, dass meinem Akt ein anderer Akt vorausgeht das Wunder und dieser falsifiziert das Gesetz.]
feeble: let's say I could make a proposition wrong in a weak sense iff I do something. The proposition would be falsified (but not necessarily because of my action, and not necessarily because of an event which happened because of my action). (Lewis pro
"Weak Thesis" ["Schwache These"] (Compatibilism)).
strong: If the proposition is falsified, either because of my action or because of an event that was caused because of my action.

Inwagen/Lewis: The first part of his thesis is strong, regardless of whether we advocate the strong or the weak thesis:
Had I been able to lift my hand, although determinism is true and I have not done so, then it is both true - according to the weak and strong sense- that I could have made the conjunctions HL (propositions about the antecedent history and the laws of nature) wrong.
But I could have made proposition L wrong in the weak sense, although I could not have done it wrong in the strong sense.
Lewis: If we advocate the weak sense, I deny premise 6.
If we advocate the strong sense, I deny premise 5.
Inwagen: Advocates both position by contemplating analogous cases.
LewisVsInwagen: I do believe that the cases are not analogous. They are cases in which the strong and the weak case do not diverge at all.
Premise 6/Inwagen: He invites us to reject the idea that a physicist could accelerate a particle faster than light.
LewisVsInwagen: But this does not contribute to support premise 6 in the weak sense

V 298
since the rejected assumption is that the physicist could falsify a law of nature in the strong sense. Premise 5/Inwagen: We should reject the assumption here that a traveller could falsify a conjunction of propositions about the antecedent history and the history of his future travel differently than a falsification of the non-historic part.
LewisVsInwagen: Reject the assumption as a whole if you would like to. It does not change anything: premise 5 is not supported in the strong sense. What would follow if a conjunction could be falsified in such a strong sense? Tht the non-historic part could be thus falsified in the strong sense? This is what would support premise 5 in the strong sense.
Or would simply follow (what I believe) that the non-historic part can be rejected in the weak sense? The example of the traveller is not helpful here because a proposition of future travels can be falsified in both weak as strong sense.[Oder würde bloß folgen, (was ich denke), dass man den nichthistorischen Teil im schwachen Sinn zurückweisen könnte? Das Bsp des Reisenden hilft hier nicht, weil eine Proposition über zukünftige Reisen sowohl im schwachen als auch im starken Sinn falsifiziert werde könnte.]
- - -
Schwarz I 28
Object/Lewis/Schwarz: Material things are accumulations or aggregates of such points. But not every collection of such points is a material object, e.g. [Bsp Alle Punktteile aller Katzen: manche liegen in Neuseeland, andere in Berlin, einige in der Gegenwart, andere im alten Ägypten.] Taken together they are neither constituting a cat nor any other object in the customary sense.
e.g. The same is valid for the aggregate of parts of which I am constituted of, together with the parts which constituted Hubert Humphrey at the beginning of 1968.
Thing: What is the difference between a thing in the normal sense and those aggregates? Sufficient conditions are difficult to find. Paradigmatic objects have no gaps, and holes are delimited from others, and fulfill a function. But not all things are of this nature, e.g. bikes have holes, bikinis and Saturn have disjointed parts. What we accept as a thing depends from our interests in our daily life. It depends on the context: e.g. whether we count the back wall or the stelae of the Holocaust Memorial or the screen or the keyboard as singly. But these things do also not disappear if we do not count them as singly!
Object/Thing/van Inwagen: (1990b) Thesis: Parts will constitute themselves to an object if the latter is a living being. So, there are humans, fishes, cats, but not computers, walls and bikinis.
Object/Thing/Lewis: better answer: two questions:
1. Under what conditions parts will form themselves to a whole? Under all conditions! For random things there is always a thing which constitutes them. (Def mereological Universalism/ > Quine).
2. Which of these aggregates do we call a singly thing in daily life? If certain aggregates are not viewed as daily things for us does not mean that they do not exist.(However, they go beyond the normal realms of our normal quantifiers.) But these restrictions vary from culture to culture. As such, it is not reality that is dependent on culture, but the respective observed part of reality (1986e, 211 213, 1991:79 81).
LewisVsInwagen/Schwarz: If only living things can form objects, evolution could not have begun. ((s) But if it is not a problem to say that living beings originated from emergentism, it should also not be a problem to say "objects" instead.)
LewisVsInwagen: no criteria for "living being" is so precise that it can clearly define.
Schw I 30
Lewis: It is not a problem for him: Conventions of the German language do not determine with atomic precision for which aggregates "living being" is accurate. (1986e, 212) LewisVsvan Inwagen: This explanation is not at his disposal: For him the distinction between living being and not a living being is the distinction between existence and non-existence. If the definition of living being is vague, the same is valid for existence as well.
Existence/Van Inwagen: (1990b. Kap.19) Thesis: some things are borderline cases of existence.
LewisVsvan Inwagen: (1991,80f,1983e,212f): If one already said "there is", then one has lost already: if one says that "something exists to a lesser degree".
Def Existence/Lewis: Simply means to be one of the things that exist.h
- - -
Schwarz I 34
Temporal Parts/van Inwagen: (1981) generally rejects temporal parts. SchwarzVsInwagen: THen he must strongly limit the mereological universalims or be a presentist.
- - -
Schwarz I 227
Modality/LewisVsInwagen: There are no substantial modal facts: The existence of possibilities is not contingent. [es gibt keine substantiellen modalen Tatsachen: was für Möglichkeiten es gibt, ist nicht kontingent.] Information about this cannot be obtained.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Jackson, F. Schwarz Vs Jackson, F.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 226
A posteriori necessity/SchwarzVsLewis/SchwarzVsJackson: but from that does not follow that if the physical truths imply anything necessary - if they constitute a metaphysical basis for all truths about the situation on the actual situation that this implication then must be also a priori. It could be that the metaphysical basis only implies a posteriori: E.g. the phrase "everything is as it actually is". Implies necessary all truths, it is only in the actual world (actual world) true. A priori it implies nothing! ((s) it is not true for any possible world, but in every possible world itself). > Panpsychism: Panpsychism/Panprotopsychism/Chalmers/Schwarz: (Chalmers 2002) takes this gap as an advantage: The starting point is a kind.
Def Quidditism (see above 5.4): Thesis: our physical theory describe how physical things and properties relate to each other, what they are, but they leave their intrinsic nature in the dark.
Def Pan(proto)psychism: Thesis: this intrinsic nature of things and properties is mental. E.g. what we know from the outside as a charge -1, turns out to be from the inside as pain. ((s)> Two Aspects teaching). Now, if our physical vocabulary is rigid (that means that it always applies in the field of modal operators on what plays for us the causal structural role (that means to pain), then the physical truths imply necessary the mental, but the implication does not need to be a priori.
Problem: the physical truths are not sufficient to tell us exactly in what situation we are in, particularly with regard to the intrinsic nature of physical quantities.

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Kim, Jaegwon Lewis Vs Kim, Jaegwon
 
Books on Amazon
V 249
Wesen/Benennen/Ereignis/Lewis: man könnte denken, dass folgendes ausreicht: "das F en von A zu T". f sei die Eigenschaft, die durch das Prädikat f ausgedrückt wird,
a sei das Individuum, das durch A bezeichnet wird,
t der Zeitpunkt, denotiert durch T.
Die Bezeichnungen müssen nicht starr sein!
"Konstitutives Tripel". (Kim, "Causation, Nomic Subsumption and the Conept of Event", 1973)
Außerdem ist das Vorkommen des Ereignisses irgendwie mit der Tatsache verbunden, dass die Eigenschaft f zu dem Individuum a zu t gehört.
Eigenschaft/Frage: wie gehört eine Eigenschaft zu einem Individuum zu t? Vielleicht weil es wirklich eine Eigenschaft von Zeitschnitten ist oder eine Relation von Individuen zu Zeiten ist.
LewisVs: dann wäre es allzu einfach, ein Wesen zuzusprechen. einfach indem man ein Tripel aufstellt. D.h. dass "das F-en von A zu T" das Ereignis bezeichnet, so dass notwendig, es dann und nur dann sich ereignet, wenn f zu a zu t gehört. ((s) Bsp es regnet notwendig am Dienstag, wenn es notwendig ist, dass es Dienstag regnet).
LewisVsKim: das genügt nicht den Bedürfnissen der kontrafaktischen Analyse der Verursachung. manchmal kann ein Ereignis tatsächlich durch eine konstitutive Eigenschaft,
V 250
ein Individuum und eine Zeit wesentlich spezifiziert werden. Aber nicht im allgemeinen für Ereignisse, die wir durch Benennen bezeichnen.
Problem: wenn das Wesen zu reich ist, ist es zu fragil. Es ist schwer, es zu modifizieren, ohne es dabei zu zerstören. Es kann nirgends vorkommen, außer zu seiner konstitutiven Zeit. Unsere alltäglichen Ursachen und Wirkungen sind robuster.
((s) es wäre unverständlich, ein Individuum zu haben, was nur einmal an einer Stelle zu einer Zeit vorkommen kann, weil man keinen Sprachgebrauch dafür hätte, d.h. die Bedeutung von etwas, das nur einmal vorkommt, ist nicht festzumachen an Prädikaten, die auch anderen Dingen zukommen können, wenn diese Prädikate wesentlich nur diesem Individuum zu kommen sollen.)
- - -
Schwarz I 132
Ereignis/LewisVsKim: seine Definition: Def Ereignis/Kim: (Kim 1976): ein Tripel aus einem Ding, einem Zeitpunkt und einer Eigenschaft.
LewisVsKim: (1986f,196) das ist zu zerbrechlich:
Schw I 133
Das weist Ereignissen zu viele wesentliche Eigenschaften zu. Bsp ein Fußballspiel hätte auch ein bisschen später oder ein wenig anders ablaufen können. Oder wäre es dann ein anderes Spiel gewesen? Bennett: (1988,§23 24) intuitiv hat die Frage keinen Sinn.
Schwarz: darauf kommt es bei Lewis aber nicht an. Aber es kommt auf die Zerbrechlichkeit an, wenn es um Ursachen und Wirkungen geht:
Def Zerbrechlichkeit/Fragilität/fragil/Ereignis/Lewis/(s): ein modifiziertes Ereignis wäre nicht dasselbe sondern ein anderes). Dann Modifikation gar nicht ausdrückbar: „was wurde modifiziert?
kontrafaktische Analyse: nach ihr verursacht A B, wenn B ohne A nicht geschehen wäre. Frage: unter welchen Umständen wäre ein Ereignis noch geschehen (wenn auch anders) und unter welchen wäre es durch ein anderes ersetzt. Das wird später noch zu Problemen führen.
Ursache/Wirkung/Lewis/Schwarz: beides sind oft keine Ereignisse im intuitiven Sinn. Bsp akustische Rückkopplung: hier werden die späteren zeitlichen Teile durch die früheren verursacht. (1986f,172f). Ähnlich: Bsp die zeitlichen Teile von Personen sind durch Kausalbeziehungen verknüpft! (s.o. 2.3). Aber diese zeitlichen Teile sind keine Ereignisse im intuitiven Sinn. Auch Ursachen wie die Anwesenheit von Sauerstoff bei einer Explosion (Als Ursache ok) ist kein Ereignis im alltäglichen Sinn. (1986d,261).
Ereignis/BennettVsLewis/MellorVsLewis/Schwarz: sollte Lewis nicht besser von „Tatsachen“ sprechen? „dass p verursacht, dass q“.
Tatsache/Schwarz: wenn man sie als Klassen von Raumzeit-Regionen versteht, ist das gar keine Alternative, sondern nur eine terminologische Variante.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Kripke, S. A. Lewis Vs Kripke, S. A.
 
Books on Amazon
V 251/252
Ereignis/Kennzeichnung/Beschreiben/Benennen/Lewis: wird meist durch akzidentelle Eigenschaften spezifiziert. Auch wenn es sogar klar ist, was es bedeutete ,es durch sein Wesen zu spezifizieren. Ein Ereignis trifft z.B. auf eine Kennzeichnung zu, hätte sich aber auch ereignen können, ohne auf die Beschreibung zuzutreffen.
Def Ereignis/Lewis: ist eine Klasse, die aus einer Region dieser Welt zusammen mit verschiedenen Regionen von anderen möglichen Welten (MöWe) besteht, in denen sich das Ereignis hätte ereignen können. (Weil Ereignisse immer kontingent sind).
Was der Beschreibung in einer Region entspricht, entspricht ihr nicht in einer anderen Region (einer anderen MöWe).
Man kann nie ein vollständiges Inventar der möglichen Beschreibungen (Kennzeichnungen) eines Ereignisses erreichen.
1. künstliche Beschreibung: Bsp "das Ereignis, das im Urknall besteht wenn Essendon das Endspiel gewinnt, aber die Geburt von Calvin Coolidge, wenn nicht". "p > q, sonst r".
2. teils durch Ursache oder Wirkungen
3. durch Referenz auf den Ort in einem System von Konventionen Bsp Unterschreiben des Schecks
4. Vermischung von wesentlichen und akzidentellen Elementen: Singen, während Rom brennt. Bsp Tripel Eigenschaft, Zeit, Individuum, (s.o.).
5. Spezifikation durch einen Zeitpunkt, obwohl das Ereignis auch früher oder später hätte vorkommen können
6. obwohl Individuen wesentlich involviert sein können, können akzidentell zugehörige Individuen herausgehoben werden.
7. es kann sein, dass ein reiches Wesen eines Ereignisses darin besteht, zu schlendern, aber ein weniger fragiles (beschreibungsabhängiges) Ereignis könnte lediglich akzidentell ein Schlendern sein. (s) Und es kann unklar bleiben, ob das Ereignis nun wesentlich durch Schlendern charakterisiert ist.
8. ein Ereignis, das ein Individuum wesentlich involviert, mag gleichzeitig akzidentell ein anderes Involvieren: Bsp ein bestimmter Soldat, der zufällig zu einer bestimmten Armee gehört, Das entsprechende Ereignis kann nicht in Regionen vorkommen, wo es kein Gegenstück zu diesem Soldat gibt, wohl aber, wenn es ein GS von dem Soldaten gibt, dieses aber zu einer anderen Armee gehört.
V 253
Dann wird die Armee akzidentell involviert, über die Weise ihres Soldaten. 9. Wärme: nichtstarrer Designator (nonrigid): (LewisVsKripke):
nicht starr: was immer diese Rolle hat: was immer die und die Manifestation hervorbringt.
Bsp Wärme hätte auch etwas anderes als Molekülbewegung sein können.
Lewis: in einer MöWe, wo Wärmefluss die entsprechenden Manifestationen hervorbringt, sind heiße Dinge solche, die eine Menge Wärmefluss haben.
- - -
Schwarz I 55
Wesen/Kontextabhängigkeit/LewisVsKripke/SchwarzVsKripke: in bestimmen Kontexten können wir durchaus fragen, Bsp wie es wäre, wenn wir andere Eltern gehabt hätten oder einer anderen Art angehörten. Bsp Statue/Ton: Angenommen, Statue und Ton existieren beide genau gleich lang. Sollen wir dann sagen, dass sie es trotz ihrer materiellen Natur schaffen, stets zu selben Zeit am selben Ort zu sein? Sollen wir sagen, dass beide gleich vie wiegen, aber zusammen nicht doppelt?
Problem: wenn man sagt, dass die beiden identisch sind, bekommt man Ärger mit den modalen Eigenschaften: Bsp das Stück Lehm hätte auch ganz anders geformt sein können, die Statue aber nicht – umgekehrt:
I 56
Bsp die Staute hätte aus Gold bestehen können, aber der Ton hätte nicht aus Gold bestehen können. Gegenstück Theorie/GT/Identität: Lösung: die relevante Ähnlichkeitsrelation hängt davon ab, wie wir auf das Ding Bezug nehmen, als Statue oder als Lehm.
Gegenstück Relation: Kann (anders als Identität) nicht nur vage und variabel, sondern auch asymmetrisch und intransitiv sein. (1968,28f): Das ist die Lösung für
Def Chisholms Paradox/Schwarz: (Chisholm, 1967): Bsp Angenommen, Kripke könnte unmöglich ein Rührei sein. Aber sicher könnte er ein wenig rühreiartiger sein, wenn er ein wenige kleiner und gelber wäre! Und wäre er ein bisschen mehr so, dann könnte er auch noch mehr so sein. Und es wäre seltsam, wenn er in jener MöWe nicht wenigstens ein kleines bisschen kleiner und gelber sein könnte.
GT/Lösung: weil die GR intransitiv ist, folgt aber keineswegs, dass am Ende Kripke ein Rührei ist. Ein GS eines GS von Kripke muss nicht ein GS von Kripke sein. (1986e,246)
I 57
KripkeVs Gegenstück-Theorie/KripkeVsLewis: Bsp wenn wir sagen „Humphrey hätte die Wahl gewinnen können“ reden wir nach Lewis eben nicht von Humphrey, sondern von jemand anderem. Und nichts könnte ihm gleichgültiger sein („he couldn’t care less“). (Kripke 1980,44f). Gegenstück/GT/SchwarzVsKripke/SchwarzVsPlantinga: die beiden Einwände missverstehen Lewis: Lewis behauptet nicht, dass Humphrey die Wahl nicht hätte gewinnen können, im Gegenteil: „er hätte die Wahl gewinnen können“ steht genau für die Eigenschaft, die jemand hat, wenn eins seiner Gegenstücke die Wahl gewinnt. Diese Eigenschaft hat Humphrey, kraft seines Charakters. (1983d,42).
Eigentliches Problem: wie macht Humphrey das, dass er in der und der MöWe die Wahl gewinnt?
Plantinga: Humphrey hätte gewonnen, wenn der entsprechenden MöWe (dem Sachverhalt) die Eigenschaft des Bestehens zukäme.
Lewis/Schwarz: diese Frage hat mit den Intuitionen auf die sich Kripke und Plantinga berufen, nichts zu tun.
- - -
Schwarz I 223
Namen/Kennzeichnung/Referenz/Kripke/Putnam/Schwarz: (Kripke 1980, Putnam 1975): These: für Namen und Artausdrücke gibt es keine allgemeinbekannte Beschreibung (Kennzeichnung), die festlegt, worauf der Ausdruck sich bezieht. These: Kennzeichnungen sind für die Referenz völlig irrelevant. Beschreibungstheorie/LewisVsKripke/LewisVsPutnam/Schwarz: das wiederlegt nur die naive Kennzeichnungstheorie, nach der biographische Taten aufgelistet werden, die dem Referenten notwendig zukommen sollen.
Lösung/Lewis: seine Beschreibungstheorie der Namen erlaubt, dass Bsp „Gödel“ nur eine zentrale Komponente hat: nämlich dass Gödel am Anfang der Kausalkette steht. Damit steht die Theorie nicht mehr im Widerspruch zur Kausaltheorie der Referenz. (1984b,59,1994b,313,1997c,353f,Fn22).
((s)Vs: aber nicht die Kennzeichnung „steht am Anfang der Kausalkette“, denn das unterscheidet einen Namen nicht von irgendeinem anderen. Andererseits: „am Anfang der Gödel Kausalkette“ wäre nichtssagend.)
Referenz/LewisVsmagische Theorie der Referenz: wonach Referenz eine primitive, irreduzible Beziehung ist, (vgl. Kripke 1980,88 Fn 38), so dass wir, selbst wenn wir alle nicht semantischen Tatsachen über uns und die Welt wüssten, immer noch nicht wüssten, worauf unsere Wörter sich beziehen, nach der wir dazu spezielle Referenz o Meter bräuchten, die fundamentale semantische Tatsachen ans Licht bringen.
Wenn die magische Theorie der Referenz falsch ist, dann genügt nicht semantische Information im Prinzip, um uns zu sagen, worauf wir uns mit Bsp „Gödel“ beziehen: „wenn die Dinge so und so sind, bezieht sich „Gödel“ auf den und den“. Daraus können wir dann eine Kennzeichnung konstruieren, von der wir a priori wissen, dass sie Gödel herausgreift.
Diese Kennzeichnung wird oft indexikalische oder demonstrative Elemente enthalten, Verweise auf die wirkliche Welt.
I 224
Referenz/Theorie/Namen/Kennzeichnung/Beschreibungstheorie/LewisVsPutnam/LewisVsKripke/Schwarz: Bsp unsere Bananen Theorie sagt nicht, dass Bananen zu allen Zeiten und in allen MöWe im Supermarkt verkauft werden. Bsp unsere Gödel Theorie sagt nicht, dass Gödel in alle MöWe Gödel heißt. ((s) >Deskriptivismus). (KripkeVsLewis: doch: Namen sind starre Designatoren). LewisVsKripke: bei der Auswertung von Namen im Bereich von Temporal und Modaloperatoren muss man berücksichtigen, was in der Äußerungssituation die Kennzeichnung erfüllt, nicht in der MöWe oder in der Zeit, von der gerade die Rede ist. (1970c,87,1984b,59,1997c,356f)
I 225
A posteriori Notwendigkeit/Kripke/Schwarz: könnte es nicht sein, dass Wahrheiten über Schmerzen zwar auf physikalisch biologischen Tatsachen supervenieren und damit notwendig aus diesen folgen, dass uns diese Beziehung aber nicht a priori oder durch Begriffsanalyse zugänglich ist? Die Reduktion von Wasser auf H2O ist schließlich nicht philosophisch, sondern wissenschaftlich. Schwarz: wenn das stimmt, macht sich Lewis die Arbeit unnötig schwer. Als Physikalist müsste er nur behaupten, dass phänomenale Begriffe in nicht phänomenalem Vokabular analysierbar sind. Man könnte auch die Analyse von Naturgesetzen und Kausalität sparen. Er könnte einfach behaupten, diese Phänomene folgten notwendig a posteriori aus der Verteilung lokaler physikalischer Eigenschaften.
a posteriori notwendig/LewisVsKripke: das ist inkohärent: dass ein Satz a posteriori ist, heißt, dass man Information über die aktuelle Situation braucht, um herauszufinden, ob er wahr ist. Bsp dass Blair der tatsächliche Premierminister ist (tatsächlich eine a posteriori Notwendigkeit) muss man wissen, dass er in der aktuellen Situation Premierminister ist,
Schw I 226
was wiederum eine kontingente Tatsache ist. Wenn wir genügend Information über die ganze Welt haben, könnten wir im Prinzip a priori entnehmen, dass Blair der tatsächliche Premierminister ist. A posteriori Notwendigkeiten folgen a priori aus kontingenten Wahrheiten über die aktuelle Situation. (1994b,296f,2002b, Jackson 1998a: 56 86), s.o. 8.2)

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, C.I. Verschiedene Vs Lewis, C.I. Berka I 168
Modalität/BeckerVsLewis, C.I.: Problem der unendlich vielen zusammengesetzten Modalitäten, die aus der Iteration und Komposition der Zeichen ~ (unmöglich) und (nicht) entstehen. VsLewis: sein System ist hier (anscheinend) nicht abgeschlossen.





Brk I
K. Berka/L. Kreiser
Logik Texte Berlin 1983
Lewis, C.I. Schwarz Vs Lewis, C.I.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 31
Personal identity/SchwarzVsLewis: his criterion is not accurate and provides in interesting cases no answer. E.g. continuity after brain surgery, etc. But Lewis does not want that. Our (vague) everyday term should only be made explicitly. Beaming/Teleportation/Doubling/Lewis: all this is allowed by his theory.
Schwarz I 60
Identity/Lewis/Centered world/Possible world/Schwarz: my desire to be someone else, does not refer to the whole world, but only to my position in the world. E.g. Twin Earth/Schwarz: one of the two planets is blown tomorrow, the two options (that we are on the one or the other) do however not correspond to two possible worlds! Detailed knowledge would not help out where we are, because they are equal. ((s) so no "centered world"). Actually, we want to know where we ourselves are in the world. (1979a,1983b,1986e:231 233).
SchwarzVsLewis: says too little about these perspective possibilities. It is not enough here to allow multiple counterparts (c.p.) in a world. It should not just be possible that Humphrey is exactly as the actual Nixon, he should also to be allowed to be different. Humphrey may not be a GS of himself. (> Irreflexive counterpart relation,> see below Section 9.2. "Doxastic counterparts".
Similarity relation. No matter what aspects you emphasize: Nixon will never be more similar to Humphrey than to himself.
Schwarz I 100
Fundamental properties/SchwarzVsLewis: this seems to waver whether he should form the fE to the conceptual basis for the reduction of all predicates and ultimately all truths, or only a metaphysical basis, on which all truths supervene. (> Supervenience reduction).
Schwarz I 102
Naturalness/Natural/Property/Content/Lewis: the actual content is then the most natural candidate that matches the behavior. "Toxic" is not a perfectly natural property (p.n.p.), but more natural than "more than 3.78 light years away" and healthy and less removed and toxic". Naturalness/Degree/Lewis: (1986e:, 61,63,67 1984b:66): the naturalness of a property is determined by the complexity or length of their definition by perfectly natural properties.
PnE: are always intrinsically and all their Boolean combinations remain there.
Problem: extrinsic own sheep threaten to look unnatural. Also would e.g. "Red or breakfast" be much more complicated to explain than e.g. "has charge -1 or a mass, whose value is a prime number in kg. (Although it seems to be unnatural by definition).
Naturalness/Property/Lewis: (1983c, 49): a property is, the more natural the more it belongs to surrounding things. Vs: then e.g. "cloud" less natural than e.g. "table in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant or clock showing 7:23".
Schw I 103
Naturalness/Properties/Lewis: (1983c: 13f): naturalness could be attributed to similarity between characteristics: E.g. a class is more natural, the more the properties of its elements resemble each other. Similarity: Lewis refers to Armstrong: similarity between universals 1978b,§16.2,§21, 1989b: §5.111997 §4.1). Ultimately LewisVs.
Naturalness/Lewis/Schwarz: (2001a:§4,§6): proposing test for naturalness, based on similarity between individual things: coordinate system: "intrinsic" and "extrinsic" axis. A property is then the more natural, the more dense and more compact the appropriate region is.
Problem: 1. that presupposes gradual similarity and therefore cannot be well used to define gradual naturalness.
2. the pnE come out quite unnatural, because the instances often do not strongly resemble each other. E.g. if a certain mass property is perfect, of course, then all things with this mass build a perfectly natural class, no matter how dissimilar they are today.
SchwarzVsLewis: it shows distinctions between natural and less natural properties in different areas, but does not show that the distinction is always the same.
Naturalness/SchwarzVsLewis: could also depend on interests and biological expression. And yet, can in various ways the different types of natural - be determined by perfect naturalness. That is not much, because at Lewis all, by definition, by the distribution of p.n.p. is determined. ((s)> Mosaic).
Schwarz I 122
Naturalness/SchwarzVsLewis: not reasonable to assume that it was objectively, regardless of how naturally it appears to us. Lewis introduced objective naturalness as a metaphysical basis for qualitative, intrinsic similarity and difference, as some things resemble each other like eggs and others do not. (see above 5.2). Intrinsic Similarity: also qualitative character and duplication: these terms are intended to be our familiar terms by Lewis.
SchwarzVsLewis: but if objective naturalness is to explain the distinction of our opinions about similarity, one cannot ask with sense the question whether the distinction serves exactly this.
So although there are possible beings (or worlds) whose predicates express relatively unnatural properties and therefore are wrong about natural laws, without being able to discover the error. But we can be sure a priori that we do not belong to them (!).
Problem: the other beings may themselves believe a priori to be sure that their physical predicates are relatively natural.
Solution: but they (and not we) were subject to this mistake, provided "natural" means in their mouth the same as with us. ((s) but we also could just believe that they are not subject to error. Respectively, we do not know whether we are "we" or "they").
Schwarz: here is a tension in our concept of natural law (NL):
a) on the one hand it is clear that we can recognize them empirically.
b) on the other hand they should be objective in a strong sense, regardless of our standards and terms.
Problem: Being with other standards can come up with the same empirical data to all other judgments of NL.
Schwarz I 134
Event/SchwarzVsLewis: perhaps better: events but as the regions themselves or the things in the regions: then we can distinguish e.g. the flight from the rotation of the ball. Lewis appears to be later also inclined to this. (2004d). Lewis: E.g. the death of a man who is thrown into a completely empty space is not caused by something that happens in this room, because there is nothing. But when events are classes of RZ regions, an event could also include an empty region.
Def Qua thing/Lewis/Schwarz: later theory: “Qua-things” (2003): E.g. „Russell qua Philosoph“: (1986d,247): classes of counterpieces – versus:
LewisVsLewis: (2003) Russell qua Philosoph and Russell qua Politician and Russell are identical. Then the difference in counterfactual contexts is due to the determined by the respective description counterpart relation. These are then intensional contexts. (Similar to 1971). counterfactual asymmetry/Lewis/Schwarz: Lewis' analysis assumes similarity between possible worlds.
HorwichVsLewis: (1987,172) should explain why he is interested in this baroque dependence.
Problem/SchwarzVsLewis: so far, the analysis still delivers incorrect results E.g. causation later by earlier events.
Schwarz I 139
Conjunctive events/SchwarzVsLewis: he does not see that the same is true for conjunctive events. Examples A, B, C, D are arbitrary events, so that A caused B and C caused D. If there is an event B&C, which exactly occurs when both B and C happen, then A is the cause of D: without A, B would not have happened, neither B&C. Likewise D would not have happened without B&C. Because causation is transitive, thus any cause causes any effect. Note: according to requirement D would not happen without C, but maybe the next possible world, in which B&C are missing, is one in which C is still taking place? According to Lewis the next possible world should however be one where the lack of cause is completely extinguished.
Schwarz: you cannot exclude any conjunctive events safely. E.g. a conversation or e.g. a war is made up of many events and may still be as a whole a cause or effect. Lewis (2000a, 193) even used quite unnatural conjunctions of events in order to avoid objections: E.g. conjunction from the state of brain of a person and a decision of another person.
Absence/Lewis/Schwarz: because Lewis finds no harmless entities that are in line as absences, he denies their existence: they are no events, they are nothing at all, since there is nothing relevant. (200a, 195).
SchwarzVsLewis: But how does that fit together with the Moore's facts? How can a relationship be instantiated whose referents do not exist?.
Moore's facts/Schwarz: E.g. that absences often are causes and effects. Something to deny that only philosopher comes to mind.
I 142
Influence/SchwarzVsLewis: Problem: influence of past events by future. Example had I drunk from the cup already half a minute ago, then now a little less tea would be in the cup, and depending on how much tea I had drunk half a minute ago, how warm the tea was then, where I then had put the cup, depending on it the current situation would be a little different. After Lewis' analysis my future tea drinking is therefore a cause of how the tea now stands before me. (? Because Ai and Bi?). Since the drinking incidents are each likely to be similar, the impact is greater. But he is not the cause, in contrast to the moon.
Schwarz I 160
Know how/SchwarzVsLewis: it is not entirely correct, that the phenomenal character must be causal effect if the Mary and Zombie pass arguments. For causal efficacy, it is sufficient if Mary would react differently to a phenomenally different experience ((s) counterfactual conditional). Dualism/Schwarz: which can be accepted as a dualist. Then you can understand phenomenal properties like fundamental physical properties. That it then (as above Example charge 1 and charge 1 switch roles in possible worlds: is possible that in different possible worlds the phenomenal properties have their roles changed, does not mean that they are causally irrelevant! On the contrary, a particle with exchanged charge would behave differently.
Solution: because a possible world, in which the particle has a different charge and this charge plays a different role, is very unlike to our real world! Because there prevail other laws of nature. ((s) is essential here that besides the amended charge also additionally the roles were reversed? See above:> Quidditism).
SchwarzVsLewis: this must only accept that differences in fundamental characteristics do not always find themselves in causal differences. More one must not also accept to concede Mary the acquisition of new information.
Schwarz I 178
Content/Individuation/Solution/LewisVsStalnaker: (1983b, 375, Fn2, 1986e, 34f), a person may sometimes have several different opinion systems! E.g. split brain patients: For an explanation of hand movements to an object which the patient denies to see. Then you can understand arithmetic and logical inference as merging separate conviction fragments.
Knowledge/Belief/Necessary truth/Omniscience/SchwarzVsLewis/SchwarzVsFragmentation: Problem: even within Lewis' theory fragmentation is not so easy to get, because the folk psychology does not prefer it.
Schw I 179
E.g. at inconsequent behavior or lie we do not accept a fragmented system of beliefs. We assume rather that someone changes his beliefs or someone wants to mislead intentionally. E.g. if someone does not make their best move, it must not be the result of fragmentation. One would assume real ignorance contingent truths instead of seeming ignorance of necessary truths. Fragmentation does not help with mathematical truths that must be true in each fragment: Frieda learns nothing new when she finally finds out that 34 is the root of the 1156. That they denied the corresponding proposition previously, was due to a limitation of their cognitive architecture.
Knowledge/Schwarz: in whatever way our brain works, whether in the form of cards, records or neural networks - it sometimes requires some extra effort to retrieve the stored information.
Omniscience/Vs possible world/Content/VsLewis/Schwarz: the objection of logical omniscience is the most common objection to the modeling mental and linguistic content by possible worlds or possible situations.
SchwarzVsVs: here only a problem arises particularly, applicable to all other approaches as well.
Schwarz I 186
Value/Moral/Ethics/VsLewis/Schwarz: The biggest disadvantage of his theory: its latent relativism. What people want in circumstances is contingent. There are possible beings who do not want happiness. Many authors have the intuition that value judgments should be more objective. Solution/Lewis: not only we, but all sorts of people should value under ideal conditions the same. E.g. then if anyone approves of slavery, it should be because the matter is not really clear in mind. Moral disagreements would then in principle be always solvable. ((s)> cognitive deficiency/Wright).
LewisVsLewis: that meets our intuitions better, but unfortunately there is no such defined values. People with other dispositions are possible.
Analogy with the situation at objective probability (see above 6.5): There is nothing that meets all of our assumptions about real values, but there is something close to that, and that's good enough. (1989b, 90 94).
Value/Actual world/Act.wrld./Lewis: it is completely unclear whether there are people in the actual world with completely different value are dispositions. But that does not mean that we could not convince them.
Relativism/Values/Morals/Ethics/Lewis/Schwarz: Lewis however welcomes a different kind of relativism: desired content can be in perspective. The fate of my neighbor can be more important to me than the fate of a strangers. (1989b, 73f).
Schwarz I 232
Truthmaker principle/SchwarzVsLewis: here is something rotten, the truth maker principle has a syntax error from the outset: we do not want "the world as it is", as truth-makers, because that is not an explanation, we want to explain how the world makes the truth such as the present makes propositions about the past true.
Schw I 233
Explanation/Schwarz: should distinguish necessary implication and analysis. For reductive metaphysics necessary implication is of limited interest. SchwarzVsLewis: he overlooks this when he wrote: "A supervenience thesis is in the broader sense reductionist". (1983,29).
Elsewhere he sees the difference: E.g. LewisVsArmstrong: this has an unusual concept of analysis: for him it is not looking for definitions, but for truth-makers ".

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, C.I. Hazen Vs Lewis, C.I.
 
Books on Amazon
IV 45
Gegenstück-Theorie/GT//Kripke/HazenVsLewis: fordert, einige logische Prinzipien aufzugeben. LewisVsKripke/VsHazen: ich bin nicht der Meinung. Bsp
(1) ist ein klassisches logisches Schema der Logik mit Identität und Quantifikation. Auf der anderen Seite ist (2) ungültig in der qML, weil die Übersetzung in GT kein Theorem ist.
(1) (x)(y)(x = y >. __x__ ↔ __y__)
(2) (x)(y)(x = y >. M x ungl. y ↔ M y ungl. y).
Wie kann (2) falsch sein? Würde seine Leugnung bedeuten, dass wir zwei verschiedenen Dinge haben, die kontingent identisch sind,?
Oder vielleicht dass ein Ding kontingent selbstidentisch ist?
Nein, nichts so sinnloses. Die GT Übersetzung sagt:
nichts in der wirklichen Welt (WiWe) hat mehr als ein GS in irgendeiner anderen Welt. Dann sagt seine Leugnung, dass etwas in der WiWe mehr als ein GS in einer einzelnen Welt hat.
Bsp im Fall von Dee, Dee1 und Dee2 , wenn Dee aktual ist.
Problem: entsteht durch die doppelte de re Frage, aus der doppelte GS resultieren.
Trotzdem bleibt (1) wahr, weil (2) gar keine Instanz von (1) ist. Wir können also (2) alleine ablehnen.
Bsp ein anderer ungültiger Satz: (3) als Instanz von (1)
(3) (x)(y)(x = y >. (Ey)y ungl x ↔ (Ey)(y ungl y)
Aber: damit das eine Instanz von (1) wäre, müsste das letzte Vorkommnis von "y" an das anfängliche "(y)" gebunden sein, aber das ist es nicht, es gehört zum nähergelegenen "(Ey)".
IV 136
Einstellungen/Lewis: ich hoffe Sie davon zu überzeugen, dass es eine willkürliche Einschränkung ist, dass Objekte von Einstellungen Mengen von Welten (MöWe) sein sollen. Subjekt/Lewis: Subjekte von Einstellungen sind verteilt über Zeit und Raum, einige sind in Neuseeland, einige im Mittelalter.
Auch sind sie über den logischen Raum verteilt: einige leben in der WiWe, andere in anderen MöWe. Zugegeben: wenn wir über sie quantifizieren, lassen wir oft alle anderen aus, bis auf die Mitbewohner der WiWe. Aber nochmals: das ist eine willkürliche Einschränkung, die wir fallen lassen können.
Lewis: jedenfalls ich kann es, einige sagen, sie können es nicht.
HazenVsLewis: das Verständnis ist begrenzt auf das, was durch Modalität und weltbezogene Quantoren ausgedrückt werden kann.
LewisVsVs: denen kann ich nicht helfen. Es ist bekannt, dass die Ausdruckskraft einer Sprache, die querweltein quantifiziert, die Art Sprache übersteigt, die jene verstehen.
Subjekt/MöWe/Lewis: jedes Subjekt einer Einstellung bewohnt nur eine einzige Welt. (s.o.).
Ich möchte mich nicht mit denen streiten, die sagen Bsp Adam ist ein großes Aggregat, teilweise in jeder von vielen Welten.
IV 137
Vs: aber dieser Adam - wenn wir ihn so nennen können - besteht aus vielen kausal isolierten Teilen, von denen jeder eigene Einstellungen hat. MöWe/Quantifikation/Lewis: wenn wir also diese Beschränkung der Quantifikation auf eine Welt fallen lassen, haben wir eine riesige (über Zeit und Raum) verteilte Bevölkerung.
Bsp was passiert nun, wenn einer aus dieser über mehrere Welten verteilten Bevölkerung einen Glauben in Form einer Proposition hat, z.B. dass Cyanoacrylat Leim sich in Aceton auflöst?
Pointe: er lokalisiert sich selbst in einer Region des logischen Raums. (Durch seine Glaubenseinstellung einer Proposition, (nicht Eigenschaft)).
Es gibt Welten, in denen Cyanoacrylat Leim sich in Aceton auflöst und Welten, in denen er es nicht tut. Er hat einen Glauben über sich selbst ((s) dann hat er immer zwei Überzeugungen): denn dass er Einwohner einer der Welten ist, wo der Leim das tut. Damit schreibt er sich selbst eine Eigenschaft zu.
(MöWe/Naturgesetze/Mathematik/Lewis/(s): Lewis gesteht MöWe mit geänderten physikalischen Bedingungen oder anders sich verhaltenden Substanzen zu, (wobei nicht explizit von geänderten Naturgesetzen die Rede ist) aber keine Welten, wo die Mathematik geändert ist).
Glauben/Lewis: kann man allgemein als Selbstzuschreibung einer Eigenschaft ansehen.
Diese Eigenschaft ist allen und nur den Bewohnern einer bestimmten Region im logischen Raum gemeinsam.

Man kann auch etwas anders denken: eine Proposition teilt die Bevölkerung: in privilegierte Bewohner einer Welt in der Cyanoycrylat Leim sich in Aceton auflöst, und Unglücklichere, die nicht in einer solchen Welt leben (wie leider ich).
Lewis, C.I. Wessel Vs Lewis, C.I.
 
Books on Amazon
System SI/CL.Lewis/Wessel: hier sind alle Axiome Tautologien und die Schlussregeln vererben den tautologischen Charakter.
Aber: p -> (q -> p) nimmt bei p = 3 und q = 3 den nichtausgezeichneten Wert 4 an, ist also nicht herleitbar und damit kein Theorem von SI:
Ebenfalls kein Theorem: ~p -> (p -> q).
Die "klassischen" Paradoxien sind vermieden, aber:
~p u p -> q und
q > ~(~p u p) ist beweisbar! ((s) andere Darstellung von Widerspruch bzw. unmöglicher Aussage)
Also:
1. Aus einem Widerspruch folgt eine beliebige Aussage
2. Eine logisch wahre Aussage folgt aus einer beliebigen. ((s) durch SI ausgeschlossen)
da in der ursprünglichen Variante von SI ein Widerspruch ~p u p als eine unmögliche Aussage definiert wurde und dessen Negation als notwendige, kann man umformulieren:
I 131
modal: 1. aus einer Unmöglichen folgt jede beliebige,
2. eine notwendige Aussage folgt aus jeder beliebigen. ((s) durch SI ausgeschlossen)
("Paradoxien der strikten Implikation").
Implikation/WesselVsLewis(Cl.): hat die Paradoxien nicht befriedigend gelöst.
Er sah zwar die Notwendigkeit eines inhaltlichen Zusammenhangs, präzisierte diesen aber nicht. (s.u.: gleiche Variablen müssen zweimal auftauchen!).
Lewis: neu: bei A > B ↔ ~(A u ~B) dürfe "A u ~B" nicht nur nicht gelten, sondern müsse unmöglich sein.
I 131
WesselVsLewis,CL.: dieser versucht, die Folgebeziehung durch modale Termini zu definieren. A -> A = def ~M(A u ~B).
1. Das ist zirkulär: eine Definition der Folgebeziehung ist nötig, um modale Termini überhaupt erst einführen zu können.
2. Die Paradoxien aus Principia Mathematica sind zwar ausgeschlossen, nicht aber die "klassischen". (Ajdukiewicz/(s) EFG bzw. wahre aus beliebiger).
3. Die strikte Implikation wird als Operator verstanden. So kann sie aber in beweisbaren Formeln der Aussagenlogik niemals vorkommen!.

We I
H. Wessel
Logik Berlin 1999
Lewis, D. Armstrong Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Arm III 70
Def Law of Nature/LoN/Lewis: Iff it occurs as a theorem (or axiom) in each of the true deductive systems that unites the best combination of simplicity and strength. Armstrong: "each" is important: Suppose we had L3 and L4 (see E.g. above), both as a law, but both support incompatible counterfactual conditionals.
Lewis: then there is no third law.
ArmstrongVsLewis: that seems wrong.
III 71
The least evil would be to say that an involuntary choice must be made between L3 or L4 as the third law. The price for this is the discovery that in some possible situations the view of Ramsey Lewis does not offer an involuntary response. This may not be a problem for Lewis:
Law/Lewis: "vague and difficult concept".
ArmstrongVsLewis: if one does not assume the regularity theory, there is a precise distinction between laws and non-laws.
Vs Systematic approach/VsRamsey/VsLewis: pro: it is as they say, the manifestations of LoN can be singled out of the Humean uniformities. But:
This is not a necessary truth. Their criterion is not part of our concept of LoN.
ArmstrongVsLewis: it is logically possible that the uniformities (unif.) in an arbitrarily chosen subclass are manifestations of LoN, while the unif. in the residue class are purely coincidental unif... It is logically possible that every Humean uniformity is the manifestation of a LoN, that none is a manifestation or that any other subclass is this class of manifestations of LoN.
- - -
Schwarz I 94
Def properties/Lewis: having a property means being a member of a class. ArmstrongVsLewis/Problem/Schwarz: you cannot explain "red" by saying that its bearer is the element of such and such a class. ((s) either, it is circular, or it misses the property, because the object (bearer) can also belong to other classes. E.g. the fact that a tomato is red is not due to the fact that it is an element of the class of red things, but vice versa.) Arm 1978a, 2,5,2,7)
Schw I 95
LewisVsVs: Unlike other representatives of the universals theory, Lewis does not want to explain what it means or why it is that things have the properties that they have. Explanation/Lewis: proper explanations don’t speak of elementness. (1997c, 1980b). However, there can be no general explanation of having properties or predication! Because the explanation has to contain predicates if it were circular. Therefore, "Having a property" is not a relation. But there is nothing more to be said about it, either. (2002a, 6,1983c: 20 24,1998b, 219). E.g. "A is F" is to be generally true, because A has this and that relationship with the property F: here, "A is in this and that relationship with the property F" would have to be true again, because A and F are in this and that relation with "having this and that relation", etc.

AR II = Disp
D. M. Armstrong

In
Dispositions, Tim Crane, London New York 1996

AR III
D. Armstrong
What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge 1983

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Bennett Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 168
Meaning: Problem: what is thus coordinated? Lewis: always only actions! BennettVsLewis: this only hides certain cracks: to give meaning to an utterance is no action!
Jonathan Bennett
I Bennett Die Strategie des Bedeutungs-Nominalismus aus Meggle (Hrsg) Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, Frankf/M 1979
Lewis, D. Block Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Ned Block
I 188
Lewis: Pain can be characterized functionally. FodorVsLewis: thus seems to be set to an identity theory of functional properties.
In my view, this amounts to an identity theory of functional states. (I 213)
Solution: Lewis: Proposal: not conjunction of all banalities, but "a bunch of them through a disjunction of conjunctions of most of them (in that case, it does not matter if some are wrong) BlockVsLewis:. But that can exacerbate the problem of distinction (1), as there may be pairs of different mentalities, which are the same with respect to most of the banalities.

Block I
N. Block
Consciousness, Function, and Representation: Collected Papers, Volume 1 (Bradford Books) Cambridge 2007
Lewis, D. Chomsky Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Noam Chomsky
Black I 200
Language/Semantics/Convention/Psychology/Lewis/Schwarz: the psychology behind the intentions and expectations does not interest Lewis. ChomskyVsLewis: denies the mechanism
LewisVsVs: that is wrongly attributed to him. In the present state of neurophysiology, he considers it idle to speculate about it.
It would also be possible that beings without internal grammar use the German language, or that different speakers of the German have different internal grammars. Therefore, we should not focus on cognitive implementation.


Cho I
N. Chomsky
Aspekte der Syntaxtheorie Frankfurt 1978

Cho II
N. Chomsky
Language and Mind Cambridge 2006

Bla I
Max Black
Bedeutung und Intention
In
Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, G. Meggle (Hg), Frankfurt/M 1979

Bla III
M. Black
The Prevalence of Humbug Ithaca/London 1983
Lewis, D. Davidson Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 114
Davidson: conventions and rules do not explain the language, the language explains them. ((s) it is not clear whether this is Lewis position).

Fodor/Lepore IV 84
note W sentence/Davidson: W sentences have the form and function of laws of nature!
25th
Language/DavidsonVsLewis: it is not useful to describe it as a system of conventions.

D I
D. Davidson
Der Mythos des Subjektiven Stuttgart 1993

D III
D. Davidson
Handlung und Ereignis Frankfurt 1990

D IV
D. Davidson
Wahrheit und Interpretation Frankfurt 1990
Lewis, D. Dennett Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I Lanz 299
DennettVsFodor: Fodor denies the assumption that intentional expressions actually denote existing persons states. Therefore Dennett denies their feature. Causal efficiency of intentional states (hence DennettVsLewis).

Den I
D. Dennett
Darwins gefährliches Erbe Hamburg 1997

Den II
D. Dennett
Spielarten des Geistes Gütersloh 1999
Lewis, D. Field Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 233
Knowledge/Belief/Explanation/Mathematics/Lewis: consequently, since mathematics consists of necessary truths, there can be no explanation problem. FieldVsLewis: at least 4 points, why this does not exclude the epistemic concerns:
1) not all the facts about the realm of mathematical antities apply necessarily. But suppose it were so, then there are still facts about the mathematical and non-mathematical realm together! E.g.
(A) 2 = the number of planets closer to the Sun than the Earth.
(B) for a natural number n there is a function that depicts the natural numbers smaller than n on the set of all particles in the universe ((s) = there is a finite number of particles).
(C) beyond all sp.t. points there is an open region, for which there is a 1: 1 differentiable representation.
I 234
of this region on an open subset of R4 (space, quadruples of real numbers). (D) there is a differentiable function y of spatial points on real numbers, so that the gradient of y indicates the gravitational force on each object, as measured by the unit mass of that object.
Field: these facts are all contingent. But they are partly about the mathematical realm (mathematical entities).
Explanation/FieldVsLewis: There remains the problem of the explanation of such "mixed" statements. (Or the correlation of these with our beliefs).
Solution: You can divide these statements: an
a) purely mathematical component (without reference to physical theories, but rather on non-mathematical entities, E.g. quantities with basic elements, otherwise the condition would be too strong). Important argument: this component can then be regarded as "necessarily true".
b) purely non-mathematical component (without reference to mathematics).
I 235
2) FieldVsLewis: even with regard to purely mathematical facts, Lewis’ answer is too simple. Necessary Facts/Mathematics: to what extent should they be necessary in the realm of mathematics? They are not logically necessary! And they cannot be reduced to logical truths by definition.
Of course they are mathematically necessary in the sense that they follow from the laws of mathematics.
E.g. Similarly, the existence of electrons is physically necessary, because it follows from the laws of physics.
FieldVsLewis: but in this physical case, Lewis would not speak of a pseudo-problem! But why should the fact that numbers exist mathematically necessary be a pseudo-problem?.
Mathematical Necessity/Field: false solution: you could try to object that mathematical necessity is absolute necessity, while physical necessity is only a limited necessity.
Metaphysical Necessity/Field: or you could say that mathematical statements.
I 236
Are metaphysically necessary, but physical statements are not. FieldVs: It is impossible to give content to that.
I 237
3) FieldVsLewis: he assumes a controversial relation between Counterfactual Conditional and necessity. It is certainly true that nothing meaningful can be said about E.g. what would be different if the number 17 did not exist. And that is so precisely because the antecedent gives us no indication of what alternative mathematics should be considered to be true in this case.
I 238
4) FieldVsLewis: there is no reason to formulate the problem of the explanation of the reliability of our mathematical belief in modal or counterfactual expressions.
II 197
Theoretical Terms/TT/Introduction/Field: TT are normally not introduced individually, but in a whole package. But that is no problem as long as the correlative indeterminacy is taken into account. One can say that the TT are introduced together as one "atom". E.g. "belief" and "desire" are introduced together.
Assuming both are realized multiply in an organism:
Belief: because of the relations B1 and B2 (between the organism and internal representations).
Desired: because of D1 and D2.
Now, while the pairs (B1, D1) and (B2, D2) have to realize the (term-introductory) theory.
II 198
The pairs (B1, D2) and (B2, D1) do not have to do that. ((s) exchange of belief and desire: the subject believes that something else will fulfill its desire). FieldVsLewis: for this reason we cannot accept its solution.
Partial Denotation/Solution/Field: we take the TT together as the "atom" which denotes partially as a whole.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie II
H. Field
Truth and the Absence of Fact Oxford New York 2001

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980
Lewis, D. Fodor Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Block I 163
Pain/FodorVsLewis: If you say that pain in humans and Martians is different, you are not stating on the basis of which properties both of them perceive pain. Any disjunction of physical conditions which used to mean pain in the history of the universe, is not a solution. Because that does not cover what the individuals have in common.
I 215
Pain/FodorVsLewis: since the property of having the state is a functional one - and not only a functionally characterized property. - Lewis is still bound by the functionalism discussed here. Pain/VsLewis: the functionalism presented here asserts a state Z is defined as a state with such and such a causal role, and the functionalist assertion becomes: "Pain = Z". Here, Z itself is not a functional state. (> ramseyfunctional correlate).
Block I 217
FodorVsLewis: the contrast to Lewis (functional characterization of a state rather than a functional state): can be made clearer: E.g. assuming, a condition type is a specific type of property. Namely, the property which each token of this condition has because it is a token of this type. Then the pain condition would be identified with the property of being a pain (not of being in pain). I.e. in terms of the pain and not of the organism. Lewis: defines pain as the state that has a certain causal role. ("ix") Functionalism/Block: pain as the property of playing a certain causal role. ("lx").
Fodor/Lepore IV 107
Radical Interpretation/RI/Lewis: governed by fundamental principles that tell us how belief and meanings are usually related to each other, as well as to behavior and sensory input.
IV 108
These fundamental principles are nothing but a lot of platitudes of common sense. E.g. that most of the beliefs of the speaker are true. But that can only be true if the speaker has several propositional attitudes. Holism/Fodor/Lepore: then holism can be derived from the conditions for the intentional attribution! Fodor/LeporeVsLewis: (he might perhaps agree): it is not clear that anything metaphysically interesting follows from the fulfillment of conditions for the intentional attribution.
IV 114
Meaning Holism/MH/Belief/Fodor/Lepore: if according to Lewis’ thesis belief has primacy over the attribution of the intentional, then it must itself be holistic. If meaning holism is to follow, for example, the following would have to be assumed: Def Thesis of the "Primacy of Belief"/PT/Lewis. Thesis "The conditions of intentional attribution include the conditions of belief attribution. Therefore: If the former is holistic, so must be the latter." Semantic Holism/SH/Fodor/Lepore: we concede that semantic holism might follow from this thesis. (belief holism seems plausible). Primacy of Belief/Fodor/LeporeVsLewis: the thesis is so strong that semantic holism emerges even without the principle of charity. Even without any theory of interpretation!.
But we do not believe that the thesis is true.
RI/Lewis/Fodor/Lepore: his version of radical interpretation does not endorse the thesis of the primacy of belief (PT) and we do not say that he accepts it at all (?). We believe that the PT is not true.
Holism/Lewis/Fodor/Lepore: but if Lewis does not represent the primacy thesis, his arguments in favor of holism are limited. They can show that belief qua belief is holistic, but not that they are holistic qua intentional.
IV 121
VsLewis: the primacy thesis is implausible.
IV 131
Fodor/LeporeVsDavison/VsLewis: it could be said: because the semantics of representations is atomistic, it follows that intentional attribution as such is not determined by constitutive principles like the principle of rationality! Allowing the attribution of irrational propositional attitudes would simply be a "change of subject". That would be no intentional states! I.e if we attribute irrational things to the speaker, we change our opinion on the content of his mental states. Vs: 1) It could be made stronger, not only epistemically, by saying that even God would change the content of his attribution, before violating rationality(?).
IV 132
2) Assuming the point was metaphysical and not only epistemic: nevertheless it does not follow from the atomistic approach to mental semantics that the principle of rationality could be ignored in the attribution. You cannot believe simultaneously that p and that not p. These principles are constitutive of belief. Also for wishes, etc.

F/L
J. Fodor/E. Lepore
Holism Cambridge USA Oxford UK 1992
Lewis, D. Fraassen Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Black I 117
Laws of Nature/LoN/Theory/van FrassenVs Lewis: (1989, § 3.3): 1) Lewis does not explain the model force of LoN: E.g. if "all Fs are Gs", then they have to be so in a good sense. Signs for this are counterfactual conditionals, which are connected to LoN (Dretske 1977, 255, Armstrong 1983, §4.4 and 69f).
Schw I 118
VsLewis: 2) his analysis does not indicate why LoN play such a large role in explanations (Dretske 1977, 262, van Fraassen 1989 §3,4, Armstrong 1983 §4.2). Is it possible to explain why this F is a G by indicating that all Fs are Gs? LewisVsVs: why should the theorems of the best theories not meet the conditions? Systematic regularities are an important property of the actual world. Therefore, similarity is assigned special weight in the evaluation of counterfactual conditionals.

Fr I
B. van Fraassen
The Scientific Image Oxford 1980

Bla I
Max Black
Bedeutung und Intention
In
Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, G. Meggle (Hg), Frankfurt/M 1979

Bla III
M. Black
The Prevalence of Humbug Ithaca/London 1983
Lewis, D. Goodman Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Goodman II Putnam Preface p VIII
irreal conditional clauses. Much discussed issue today. David Lewis: has developed a formalist scheme that presupposes a totality of possible worlds and a "similarity metrics" that measures their similarity in degrees. GoodmanVsLewis: these are not solutions that give us principles at hand to decide which worlds are actually more or less similar.
p IX
There are no "possible but not actual" worlds! - - -
Putnam I 198
Possible Worlds/GoodmanVsLewis: not many worlds, but many versions of our world. They are correctable, relative to each task, and not subjective!

G I
N. Goodman
Weisen der Welterzeugung Frankfurt 1984

G II
N. Goodman
Tatsache Fiktion Voraussage Frankfurt 1988

G III
N. Goodman
Sprachen der Kunst Frankfurt 1997

G IV
N. Goodman/K. Elgin
Revisionen Frankfurt 1989

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990
Lewis, D. Kaplan Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 43
Mögliche Welt/MöWe/Schwarz: man kann sich MöWe vielleicht als eine Art kontingenter Erweiterung der Wirklichkeit vorstellen. >Kaplan: MöWe/Teleskop/KaplanVsLewis/Schwarz: (1979,93) für MöWe brauchen wir besondere modale Teleskope: Def „Verneoskope“ (Terminologie).auch „modale Intuition“. Damit erfahren wir vielleicht, dass es Universen mit sprechenden Eseln gibt, aber keins, wo Kripke andere Vorfahren hat. (Plantinga 1987,212, Skyrms 1976).
MöWe/LewisVsKaplan/LewisVs Teleskoptheorie: MöWe können gar nicht anders sein, als sie sind, (also nicht kontingent) sie sind nicht mit Verneoskopen erforschbar.
D. Kaplan
Here only external sources; compare the information in the individual contributions.

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Kripke Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 55
Possible Worlds/Kripke: If someone demands that any world must be described in a purely qualitative manner, we cannot say "suppose Nixon had lost the election"; we must rather apply a prescription: "suppose a man who looks like an incarnation of David Frye and who has a dog named Checkers is located in a specific possible world and loses the election." An example of this Counterpart Theory is David Lewis. Possible world/Lewis: Counterparts, not the same people - Kripke: Then it is not about identification but similarity relation.
KripkeVsLewis: His possible worlds are like foreign countries. Strictly speaking, his view is not a conception of "identification of possible worlds". He is rather of the opinion that the similarities between possible worlds determine a counterpart relation that is neither symmetric nor transitive. The counterpart is never identical to the object. When we say "Humphrey could have won the election if he had done something else" then we do not talk about something that could have happened to Humphrey. We are talking about something, a "counterpart" that could have happened to somebody. KripkeVsLewis: his conception seems to be even more bizarre than the usual terms of the identification in possible worlds to me.
I 90/91
Counterpart/Lewis: Representatives of the theories that a possible world is given to us only qualitatively ("Counterpart Theory", David Lewis) argue that Aristotle or his counterparts can be "identified in other possible worlds" with the things who resemble the most to Aristotle’s most important characteristics. KripkeVsLewis: Aristotle’s main characteristics are in his works, Hitler in his murderous political role. But both could have lived without having had these characteristics at all. There is no logical destiny hanging over them which would make it inevitable that they would possess the characteristics which are important for them in our opinion. Important characteristics do not need to be essential.
I 181
Counterpart (Lewis) is qualitatively defined - KripkeVs: Possible world is not qualitatively defined but determined.
V XIII
KripkeVsLewis: E.g. a round plate of homogeneous material. The question whether this plate rotates or not is a characteristic of the world which does not supervene on the arrangement of qualities(AoQ)! We could have two possible worlds, one with a rotating and the other with a rotating plate, and the arrangement of qualities would be exactly the same.

K III
S. A. Kripke
Outline of a Theory of Truth (1975)
In
Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, R. L. Martin (Hg), Oxford/NY 1984
Lewis, D. Putnam Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I Lanz 291
Functionalism/identity theory: common: recognition of causally relevant inner states. But functionalism Vsidentity theory: the substance is not what plays a causal role for the commitment. (PutnamVsLewis). ---
Horwich I 437
"Elite classes"/Nature/Natural Reference/world/language/Lewis/Putnam: thesis, there are certain classes of things "out there" (elite classes) which are intrinsically distinguished, whereby it is a "natural condition" for reference, (incorporated into nature), that as many of our concepts as possible should refer to these elite classes. This does not clearly determine the reference of our terms, because sometimes there are other desiderata, but so the language is "tied to the world".
Löwenheim/Putnam: from my ((s) Löwenheim-) argument follows that all our beliefs and experiences would be the same and none of my critics has ever contested that.
N.B.: it follows that Lewis "natural conditions" were not brought in by our interests, but that they are something that works with our interests to fix reference.
LewisVsLöwenheim/Putnam: Lewis' thesis boils down to that e.g., the class of cats longs to be designated but not the one of cats*.
Reference/PutnamVsLewis: his idea of the elite classes does not solve the problem of reference, but even confuses the materialist picture, by introducing something spooky.
PutnamVsLewis: this does not only affect reference but also justification, relations of simultaneous assertibility, (that something could remain true, while something other is no longer true). All this cannot be fixed by something psychological, by something "in the head".
PutnamVsPhysicalism: it cannot say that they are fixed, without falling back into medieval speech of a "clear causal order." Physicalism cannot say how it would be fixed, without falling back into medieval speech.
---
Black I 149
"New Theory of Reference/PutnamVsLewis/KripkeVsLewis/Schwarz: Did Kripke and Putnam not prove that, what an expression refers to, has nothing to do with associated descriptions? Then it could be that we are referring with "pain" to a state that does not play the everyday psychological role, which is not caused by injuries, etc., but may play the role that we mistakenly attribute to "joy". Then people would typically smile with pain. Typical cause of pain would be the fulfillment of wishes.
LewisVsPutnam: thinks this is nonsense. When a state plays the role of joy, it is joy.
---
Putnam III 176
Possible Worlds/Lewis: I believe in what is claimed by permissible reformulations of my beliefs. Does one take the reformulation at face value, I believe in the existence of entities that could be called "ways, how things could have turned out". These entities, I call "possible worlds". (Realistic interpretation possible worlds.) PutnamVsLewis: "way" does not necessarily need to be interpreted as a different world.
---
III 177
Possible Worlds/David Lewis: we already know what our world is all about, other worlds are things of the same kind, which do not differ in kind, but only by the processes that take place in them. We call our world, therefore the real world, because it is the world in which we live. Possible world/PutnamVsLewis: a possible "way" of world development could also be perceived as a property, not as a different world. This property could be (no matter how complicated) a feature that could correspond to the whole world.
Possible World/PutnamVsLewis: if a "way of possible world development" would be a property (a "state description" of the whole world), and the Eiffel Tower would have a different height, then the property "is a world in which the Eiffel Tower is 150 meters high" must follow from the property that the Eiffel tower in our world is not 150 meters high.
Lewis: claims, properties would have to be something simple, and the statement that a property follows from another, boils down to the assertion that there is a necessary relationship between various simple ones, and that is, as Lewis says, "incomprehensible". So the properties would have to be in turn interpreted as complexes. But Lewis is unable to see in how far properties could be complexes, because of what should they be made?
---
III 178
PutnamVsLewis: Lewis has not answered here in the "analytical" style. He did not say normal things. I have no idea what is going on with the intuitive ideas claimed by Lewis, why something works intuitively and something else works incomprehensible. The argument that something simple cannot enter a relationship, is according to my impression far from possessing practical or spiritual significance. I find these intuitive ideas not only alien; I even feel I do not understand what it means. ---
Putnam I 187
Counterfactual conditionals/unreal conditionals/Lewis: Suggestion: analyze "cause" based on unreal conditional sentences: "If A had not happened, B would not have happened". Counterfactual conditional/PutnamVsLewis: there are situations in which it is simply not true that B would not have happened if A had not happened.
---
I 201
E.g. B could have been caused by another cause. E.g. Identical twins: it is so that both always have the same hair color. But the hair of one is not the cause of the other. Lewis cannot separate this.
Counterfactual conditionals/unreal conditionals/truth conditions/Lewis/Stalnaker: Lewis follows Stalnaker and provides truth condition for unreal conditional clauses: for this he needs possible worlds and a similarity measure.
Definition truth condition/Lewis: "If X would have happened, Y would have happened" is true if and only if Y, in all closest worlds where X is the case, is really true.
PutnamVsLewis: an ontology, which requires parallel and possible worlds, is at least not a materialistic ontology. Besides it also sounds pretty much like science fiction.
---
I 188/189
The notion of an intrinsic similarity measure, i.e. a measure that is sensitive to the fact of what we deem relevant or normal, is again in such a way that the world is like a ghost or impregnated with something like reason. This then requires a metaphysical explanation and is therefore idealism.
And objective idealism can hardly be "a bit true".
"It is all physics, except that there is that similarity measure makes simply no sense.
---
Putnam I 189
Identity/nature/essence/Lewis: Proposal: the aggregation of molecules and "I" are identical for a period of time, similar to Highway 2 and Highway 16, which are identical for some time. VsLewis: but not every property of aggregation is a property of mine.

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994

Bla I
Max Black
Bedeutung und Intention
In
Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, G. Meggle (Hg), Frankfurt/M 1979

Bla III
M. Black
The Prevalence of Humbug Ithaca/London 1983
Lewis, D. Quine Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Willard V. O. Quine
II 15
Possible Worlds/Quine: Most methods are body oriented, they do not concern the concept of identity, but that of the body. Most predicates designate bodies, derive their individuation from them. Moment-to-moment identification. The dollar example seems rather forced We put our liberal ontology of physical objects up to the stubborn fixation on the body. All objects form values of ​​my variables (in case of quantification)
II 158
And what would the analog values be ​​in other worlds? Simply the totals of physical objects in all possible worlds, where the residents indiscriminately are connected. Example: One of these values was "Napoleon, with his counterparts in other worlds", another would consist of Napoleon together with various disparate dissimilar inhabitants of other worlds. Therefore, the quantification over objects across possible worlds does not require in the least that we derive any sense from the term "counterpart"! Like any instantaneous objects form time segments at different times which belong not only to one, but to countless protracted objects. (QuineVsLewis).
Quantification over one area is no more difficult than over several areas if there are no additional difficulties with respect to possible worlds.
They do exist indeed: not in the quantification, but in the predicates.

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003
Lewis, D. Verschiedene Vs Lewis, D. Metz II 274
Nida-RümelinVsLewis: dieser Einwand ist hier vom Tisch, nachdem wir gezeigt haben, daß auf der 1. Stufe (Marianna findet ein bunt möbliertes Zimmer mit z.T. falsch kolorierten Drucken vor) die Alternativen ins Blickfeld rücken, diese dann auf der 2. Stufe ausgeschlossen werden. Echtes phänomenales Wissen.
Lewis I 9
ShafferVsIdentitätstheorie: sie könne nicht wahr sein, da Erlebnisse mit analytischer Notwendigkeit nicht räumlich seien, während die neuralen Ereignisse im Nervensystem stattfinden. LewisVsShaffer: das ist nicht analytisch oder sonstwie notwendig. Und neurale Ereignisse sind ebenfalls Abstrakta. Was immer sich aus Überlegungen über Erlebnisse als Argument für Nichträumlichkeit ergibt, müßte auch für neurale Ereignisse gelten. - VsLewis: es ist Unsinn, wenn man eine bloße Lautkette oder Schriftzeichenkette als einen möglichen Träger einer Bedeutung oder eines Wahrheitswertes ansieht. Bedeutung/Träger: Träger der Bedeutung sind nur einzelne Sprechakte! -LewisVsVs: Meine Behauptung ist nicht, daß Laute und Schriftzeichen Träger der Bedeutung sind, sondern, daß sie Bedeutung und Wahrheit relativ auf eine Sprache bzw. Population tragen. Ein einzelner Sprechakt kann Träger der Bedeutung sein, weil er in den meisten Fällen die in seiner jeweiligen Vollzugssituation verwendete Sprache eindeutig bestimmt. - II 213 VsLewis: Eine auf MöWe rekurrierende Bedeutungstheorie ist zirkulär. - Def MöWe/VsLewis): Der Begriff einer möglichen Welt ist selbst durch Rekurs auf semantische Termini zu erklären. MöWe sind Modelle der analytischen Sätze einer Sprache bzw. Diagramme oder Theorien solcher Modelle. -LewisVs: MöWe können nicht durch Rekurs auf semantische Termini erklärt werden. MöWe existieren und sollten nicht durch ihre sprachlichen Repräsentationen ersetzt werden. 1.Eine solche Ersetzung funktioniert nicht richtig: zwei in der repräsentierenden Sprache ununterschiedbare Welten erhalten (fälschlich) ein und dieselbe Repräsentation zugeordnet. - 2.Eine solche Ersetzung wäre auch völlig unnötig: der Begriff der MöWe ist auch für sich vollkommen verständlich. II 214 ++ - Hypostatiserung von Bedeutung II 216 - VsLewis: nicht bloß Worte, auch Dinge existieren! - VsVs: wir können eine Grammatik bilden - VsLewis: vielleicht interne Repräsentation? VsVs: bringt nichts! II 221 - Konvention mehr als Vereinbarung: die anderen müssen daran glauben! II 222 - VsLewis:Sprachkonventionen sind um nichts besser als unsere berühmt-berüchtigten obskuren alten Freunde, die Sprachregeln. II 223 VsVs: Eine Konvention der Wahrhaftigkeit und des Vertrauens könnte man durchaus als eine Regel bezeichnen - VsLewis: Sprache ist nicht konventionell. LewisVs: Mag sein, daß es weniger Konventionalität gibt, als wir ursprünglich dachten. Trozdem gibt es Konventionen der Sprache-II 224 - VsLewis: Nur wer zugleich Mengentheoretiker ist, kann erwarten, daß sich die anderen an die Regularität halten. LewisVs: Ein gewöhnlicher Mensch braucht keinen Begriff von L zu besitzen, um erwarten zu können, daß die anderen wahrhaftig und vertrauensvoll in L sind. Er braucht nur Erwartungen über Handeln zu haben. II 225 - VsLewis:Verwendung von Sprache ist nahezu nie eine rationale Angelegenheit. LewisVs: Eine Handlung kann selbst dann rational und erklärbar sein, wenn sie aus Gewohnheit und ohne Gedanken getan wurde. II 226 - VsLewis: Sprache kann unmöglich auf Konventionen zurückgehen. Man kann sich unmöglich irgend wann auf alles geeinigt haben LewisVs: Zugegeben, die erste Sprache kann unmöglich auf eine Konvention zurückgehen. II 227 - VsLewis: Bsp AG ein zeitlebens isolierter Mensch könnte aufgrund seiner genialen Begabung eines Tages spontan beginnen, eine Sprache zu verwenden. LewisVs: Auch der isoliert lebende Mensch hält sich immer wieder an eine gewisse Regularität. II 227 - VsLewis: Es ist zirkulär, die Bedutung in P von Sätzen mithilfe der von den Mitgliedern von P gemachten Annahmen zu definieren.LewisVs: Es kann schon sein, aber daraus folgt nicht, daß das Machen einer Annahme als das Akzeptieren von Sätzen analysiert werden sollte. II 228 - VsLewis: Bsp AG Population notorischer Lügner. LewisVs: Ich bestreite, daß L in dieser Population verwendet wird! II 229 - Bsp Ironiker: diese Leute sind tatsächlich wahrhaftig in L! Sie sind jedoch nicht im wörtlichen Sinne wahrhaftig in L! D.h. sie sind wahrhaftig in einer anderen, mit L verknüpften Sprache, die wir "wörtlich-L" nennen können. II 229 -VsLewis: Wahrhaftigkeit und Vertrauen (hier nicht in L) können keine Konvention sein. LewisVs: Die Konvention ist nicht die Regularität der Wahrhaftigkeit und des Vertrauens schlechthin. Sie ist es in einer bestimmten Sprache! ihre Alternativen sind Regularitäten in anderen Sprachen! II 232 - VsLewis: Selbst Wahrhaftigkeit und Vertrauen in L können keine Konvention sein. + moralische Verpflichtung. Lewis: Eine Konvention besteht deshalb weiter, weil jeder Grund hat, sich an sie zu halten, falls dies andere tun, das ist die Verpflichtung. II 233 - VsLewis: Wieso Kommunikation, wenn die Leute aus einer Aussage auch ganz andere Schlußfolgerungen ziehen können? - VsVs ist mit meiner Theorie durchaus verträglich. Das sind dann aber keine unabhängigen Konventionen sondern Nebenprodukte. II 234 - VsLewis: nicht nur eine Sprache, sondern unendlich viele Fragmente (z.B. Interesse an Kommunikation usw.) VsVs: das ist tatsächlich so, die Sprache ist inhomogen II 235 Bsp Gebildete/Ungebildete - VsLewis: Schweigen ist keine Unwahrhaftigkeit. VsVs: richtige Erwartung von Wahrhaftigkeit, aber kein Vertrauen! II 237 - VsLewis: entweder analytisch oder nicht, kein fließender Übergang! VsVs: unscharfe Analytizität mit Hilfe gradueller Konventionalität: bezügl. der Stärke der Annahmen oder der Häufigkeit der Ausnahmen, oder Ungewissheit, ob gewisse Welten tatsächlich möglich sind. II 238/239 - VsLewis: These und Anti-These beziehen sich auf verschiedene Gegenstände: a) auf semantische (künstliche) Sprachen, b) auf Sprache als Teil der Naturgeschichte - VsVs: nein, es gibt nur eine Sprachphilosophie, Sprache und Sprachen sind komplementär! II 240




Lewis, D. Martin Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Arm II 182
Abwesenheit/Lewis: wie Quines "Anbetrachten" nur eine facon de parler eine "happenstance of idiom". MartinVsLewis/MartinVsQuine: das muß man überhaupt nicht deontologisieren.
Anbetracht/Martin: ("sake"): ist der angenommene Nutzen von etwas, durch Instantiation eines Zustands oder einer Bedingung durch eine Aktion oder Unterlassen. Es genügt, daß wir ungefähr wissen, nach was in der Welt wir Ausschau halten sollen, wenn von "Anbetracht" die Rede ist. Auch wenn meistens herauskommt, daß es in Begriffen der theoretischen Physik nicht darstellbar (zu vervollständigen) ist. Aber auf der Ebene, wo wir über die beobachtbare Welt reden ist solche Vollständigkeit unnötig.
Abwesenheit/Löcher/MartinVsLewis: auch hier ist eine Deontologisierung überflüssig.
Lösung: statt "wie die Dinge sind" sollte man besser sagen: "Wie die Welt ist" oder "Wie es ist" entweder zu einer bestimmten Zeit an einem bestimmten Ort, oder auch ganz allgemein. Dann werden "Dinge" gar nicht erwähnt.

Arm II 183
MartinVsLewis: aber der Satz "Es gibt keine Falschmacher für "es gibt keine arktischen Pinguine"" ist genauso ein negativer Existenzsatz. Lösung/Martin: es ist kein negativer Existenzsatz über Dinge, sondern es geht um einen Zustand einer Raumzeit Region. Der Satz über die Abwesenheit von Falschmachern braucht einen Satz über einen Weltzustand als Wahrmacher.
Problem: und zwar genauso wie "Es gibt keine arktischen Pinguine". Daher kann er auch nicht gebraucht werden, um zu zeigen, dass der letztere Satz keinen Zustand als Wahrmacher braucht.
II 186
Leere/Abwesenheit/MartinVsLewis: dieser will immer den Doughnut ansehen und nicht das Loch. Das kann man aber durchaus konkreter fassen: Bsp wenn wir ein Hemd ohne Flecken aussuchen, dann halten wir nicht nach dem reinen Nichts Ausschau, sondern nach der Abwesenheit von Flecken.

Mart I
C. B. Martin
The Mind in Nature Oxford 2010

AR II = Disp
D. M. Armstrong

In
Dispositions, Tim Crane, London New York 1996

AR III
D. Armstrong
What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge 1983
Lewis, D. Bigelow Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 91
Perfectly natural property/PNP/BigelowVsLewis: even that is black magic, if such classes are compared with heterogeneous classes; our theory of universals avoids it.
I 192
Possible worlds/Poss.w./Lewis/BigelowVsLewis: Problem: it is surprising that such parts would then at least have to have a temporal part together. (see above) E.g. assuming we meet Jane from a different part of the same possible world Let’s consider the counterfactual conditional/Co.co.: if we had not met Jane, she would not have existed. BigelowVsLewis: according to him, this must be true Bigelow/Pargetter: according to us, it is clearly wrong. There must therefore be at least one possible world where Jane exists and we do not meet her. And this possible world would have to contain all of us and Jane, even though there is no connection between us.
I 197
Representation/Bigelow VsLewis: E.g. assuming there are twins in the real world (actual world), Dum and Dee, who are absolutely identical, but could have been different. That means that in other possible worlds there are twins, Tee Dum and Tee Dee, who differ more from one another, but are sufficiently similar to ours to be accepted as a counterpart. Then it is possible that a counter part,e.g. Tee Dum is more similar to Dum, than Tee Dee Dee is to Dee. Lewis: his theory implies that of the non-actual twins Tee Dee is more similar, and so he is Dees’s counterpart, which we also hope. Problem: Tee Dee is also closer to Dum than any of his world companions, so that he is also a counterpart of Dum. Tee Dee is the counterpart of both Dee and Dum, and Tee Dum is cp of neither of them! And the fact that Tee Dum cannot be a c.p. is due to the properties of his brother and has nothing to do with its own intrinsic properties. BigelowVsLewis: nevertheless, it is not plausible to say that, because that is equivalent to the modal statement that one of the twins could not have been different if the other one had not been different as well. This is unacceptable.
I 199
Rivals theory/VsLewis/Bigelow/Pargetter: the rival theory asserts, thesis: that the counterparts are in fact numerically identical to the corresponding individual in the actual world. The rival theory uses the relation of numerical identity.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Lewis, D. Blackburn Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Simon Blackburn
Schwarz I 57
Counterpart/cp/RosenVsLewis/BlackburnVsLewis: the counterpart theory turns our emotional attachment to the counterfactual facts into a mystery. Why should we, worry about things that happen to other people in other universes? LewisVsVs/Schwarz: why should we care about the elements of maximum consistent sentence quantities or the counterfactual properties of abstract facts?
Counterfactual/Bennett/Schwarz: one reason why the K interests us is that we want to avoid future mistakes. (Bennett, 1988.62).
Existence/SchwarzVsLewis: imprecise formulation: for Lewis Humphrey only exists in the real world, but in a broader sense - as a cp - he exists in many possible worlds, of course.
KripkeVsLewis/PlantingaVsLewis: deny that there are possible worlds which include Humphrey as a real part.
Kris McDaniel/Schwarz: is the only one who ever claimed that the possible worlds e.g. contain Humphrey as a real spatio-temporal part. (2004).

Blckbu I
S. Blackburn
Spreading the Word : Groundings in the Philosophy of Language Oxford 1984

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Schiffer Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Stephen Schiffer
I 30
Covering Law/Solution/Lewis: they are implicated in the attribution of individual belief, while the mechanism of this implication is revealed by the definition of belief and desires in terms of folk psychology. Covering Law/SchifferVsLewis: I still believe that we cannot find the covering laws. Then the corresponding explanatory model can also not be correct.

Schi I
St. Schiffer
Remnants of Meaning Cambridge 1987
Lewis, D. Peacocke Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
EMD II 169
Lewis: Chomsky: Thesis: it could be that we have far fewer conventions than is generally assumed. But as long as there are at least two possible human languages, there must be a convention according to which the choice is explained. PeacockeVsLewis: that is funny: in the borderline case where there is no other equally rich language, can this fact prevent a possible language from being the actual language?
Then it might seem as if it were a matter of convention whether L1 is an actual language of P1, but not a matter of convention whether L2 is an actual language of P2.
Ipso facto, the actual language relation (see above II165, application to the world ) is not analyzed in terms of the conventions.
II 187
Truth/Actual Language/Peacocke: but we can explain the concept of truth "true in L" that only related to the language (unlike the general W concept) to someone by total recursion: we can teach its use (like winning). For this we do not need to presuppose the general concept of truth (in this case). (Conditions of use) Here, no specific starting point is required, it is only necessary that you start somewhere.
PeacockeVsLewis: (conventions) he avoids this current point, but at the price that he has to introduce a quantification over possible worlds, or at least over conditions or propositions.

Pea I
Chr. R. Peacocke
Sense and Content Oxford 1983

EMD II
G. Evans/J. McDowell
Truth and Meaning Oxford 1977

Ev I
G. Evans
The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks) Oxford 1989
Lewis, D. Montague Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 10
Erlebnis: nicht identisch mit der Eigenschaft, die man jemandem dadurch zu spricht, dass man sagt, er habe dieses Erlebnis. Erlebnis: derjenige Zustand, der eine gewisse definierende kausale Rolle innehat.
Eigenschaft: eben die Eigenschaft, sich in dem Zustand zu befinden.
Bsp Schmerzen sind nicht identisch mit der Eigenschaft, Schmerzen zu haben! »Schmerz« ist ein kontingenter Name., das heißt, der hat in verschiedenen möglichen Welten verschiedene Denotationen. (Nicht starr).
»Die Eigenschaft, Schmerzen zu haben«, ist demgegenüber ein nicht kontingenter Name. (Starr, in jeder möglichen Welt das gleiche).( I 11 +: MontagueVsLewis, LewisVsMontague).
Lewis, D. Cresswell Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 23
Performance/Competence/Semantic/Cresswell: what relationships are there between the two of them? Lewis: Convention of truthfulness and trust: in L: thesis: most language use is based on it.
---
I 24
We assume that the speakers are trying to express true sentences and we expect the same from others. Important argument/CresswellVsLewis: this may be the case, but to me it seems to be more a matter of empirical investigation than a definition that it should be so. And therefore:
---
I 33
Language/Bigelow/Cresswell: John Bigelow tells me, thesis: that one of the earliest functions of language was storytelling. Then it is more about imagination than everyday communication! ((s)VsCresswell: 1) How does Bigelow know that? 2) Why should one draw such far-reaching conclusions from that). CresswellVsLewis: even if it should turn out that there was a logical link between the convention and the use of language, it seems better to me not to include this in a theory of semantics from the start. Anyway, we do not need a connection of competence and performance.
---
II 142
Fiction/Belief de re/Lewis/Cresswell: (Lewis 1981, 288): E.g. In France, children believe that Papa Noel brings gifts to all children; in England, Father Christmas only brings them to the good children (and these get twice as many gifts, as Pierre calculates). De re/Fiction/Lewis: this cannot be an attitude de re, because there is no such res in both cases.
Fiction/CresswellVsLewis: here you can also have a reference de re, even if the causal connection is not direct.
Solution/Devitt: storytelling.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Lewis, D. Stalnaker Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Bigelow I 117
StalnakerVsLewis: (1968, 1981) defends the conditional proposition of the excluded third against Lewis. - - -
Lewis V 183
"hidden property"/LewisVs: "My opponent": thinks that no real probability but a "fake" probability is in play. (see above) E.g. 88%,3%). (s) A "given variation" which then comes into force if c is withdrawn. Lewis: if this is true then it would be okay, then e would be somehow predetermined. It would be so to speak easier for the counterfactual conditional (co.co.).
LewisVs: but we still have to accept real probability.
Opponent: sounds like Stalnaker if he says: e would have happened either with c or without c. But his position is not the same although he accepts the same disjunction of co.co. and Stalnaker's defenses do not help him.
Opponent: thinks that there are two relevant ways how the world could be, one would make a co.co. true, the other way the other. Thus the disjunction is in any case true.
StalnakerVs: (Lewis pro): there is only one relevant way of how the world is and it makes none of the co.co. definitely true or false.
Ontology/semantics/StalnakerVsLewis: the two co.co. are true or false relative to alternative arbitrary resolutions of a semantic indeterminacy. ((s) Semantic assumptions shall make ontological assumptions superfluous).
V 184
What causes that the co.co. does not determine the truth is that different solutions involve different approaches. But any solution makes the one or the other true, the disjunction is certainly true despite the complementary vagueness of the disjoint. This alleged semantic indeterminacy is not a real property in the world.
Stalnaker differs with me in a small semantic question, with my opponents in a great ontological question.
- - -
Schwarz I 60
Counterpart/c.p./counterpart theory/c.p.theory/counterpart relation/c.p.r./StalnakerVsLewis: if you already allow almost any relations as counterpart relation you could also use non-qualitative relationships. (Stalnaker 1987a): then you can reconcile the counterpart with Haecceitism: if you do not stumble against the fact that at Lewis (x)(y)(x = y > N(x = y) is false, (Lewis pro contingent identity, see above) you can also determine that a thing always only has one GS per possible world (poss.w.). Stalnaker/Schwarz: that does not work with qualitative counterpart relation as it is always possible that several things - e.g. in a fully symmetrical world - are exactly equally similar to a third thing in another poss.w..
LewisVsStalnaker: Vs non-qualitative c.p.r.: all truths including the modal truths are to be based on what kind of things exist (in act.wrld. and poss.w.) and which (qualitative) properties they have (> "Mosaic").

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Plantinga Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 168
Content/Proposition/TraditionVsLewis/PlantingaVsLewis/Schwarz: This construction does not meet all the traditional requirements of propositions and content: (Plantinga 1987, 208 f): we must be in an interesting relation with the object (acquaintance or grasping), content must be directly causally implicated in acts. Classes of possible situations don't do that. Lewis (1983b, 375 Fn 2) compares them with figures in the indication of physical quantities.

Plant I
A. Plantinga
The Nature of Necessity (Clarendon Library of Logic and Philosophy) Revised ed. Edition 1979

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Simons Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 282
Event/possible worlds/poss.w./SimonsVsLewis: it seems too restrictive, that an event should not be able to occur in several possible worlds. The identity of a possible world depends mainly on what exists and what can be found in them,
I 282
And we can, however, imagine e.g. two possible worlds that are exactly the same in terms of a specific event and its causal precursors, but which differ in regard to something causally completely independent of this event. Time/poss.w/SimonsVsLewis: there could also be two possible worlds that are identical up to a certain time but diverge later. Then there is no reason to deny the identity of events up to this point.

Si I
P. Simons
Parts Oxford New York 1987
Lewis, D. Castaneda Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Hector-Neri Castaneda
Frank I 329
Proposition/Belief/Self-attribution/CastanedaVsAttribution theory/CastanedaVsLewis: 1) Lewis defines the belief objects extensionally (from quantities). This violates Castaneda’s second intentionality condition for the objects of intentional attitudes. (see above).
Possible Worlds are unsuitable as primary objects of belief because of their infinite extension (infinitely many aspects) and properties cannot be individuated by sets of objects, because the creation of sets presupposes the predication of properties. (>Individuation). 2) Lewis’ thesis that self-attribution can be explained only by a non-propositional knowledge depends on the premise that there could be no indexical proposition or related related to private issues.
CastanedaVsLewis: but there is no convincing justification for that.
Possible world/CastanedaVsLewis: considers it conceivable that a possible world does not only consist of public physical objects, but also contains subjective referees like I representations and indexical representations. This world could then also include its subjectively colored ways of the circumstance (intension). Then a subject that knows all the propositions would also be able to recognize its own position (propositional knowledge).
I 356
Propostional knowledge/Lewis: E.g. "Two omniscient Gods": (slightly abridged original quote): they are omniscient, because they know every proposition. But I can imagine that they suffer from one ignorance: neither of them knows which one he is. There is nothing else to know, they would merely attribute more of the properties they have to themselves. He has this property and his world comrade does not have it, so the self-attribution of this property does not depend on him knowing which one is his world. Thesis: sometimes there are property objects, while propositional objects are not available. Some beliefs and some knowledge cannot be understood as propositional, but can be understood as self-attribution of properties. CastanedaVsLewis: that depends on the relevant meaning that one associates with "property" and "proposition". Therefore, he defines them in his spirit, and creates counter-intuitive premises.
I 358
6) CastandedaVsLewis: It also does not readily apply that perceptual knowledge is not propositional. To the extent that demonstrative references take place, it is about the question of whether possible worlds contain volatile and private particulars. 7) the idea that Is, nows and this’s are objects of private knowledge is well founded. CastanedaVsLewis: but they do not have to be inexpressible. It is just the function of quasi indicators to capture the indexical references of other persons by means of interpersonal and non-volatile references.

Cast I
H.-N. Castaneda
Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness Bloomington 1999

Fra I
M. Frank (Hrsg.)
Analytische Theorien des Selbstbewusstseins Frankfurt 1994
Lewis, D. Lycan Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 66
Reduktionismus/Modalität/LycanVsLewis: dieser hat keine reduktive Erklärung von Modalität weil er auf die Frage, was es für mögliche Welten (MöWe) gibt, nur sagen kann „alle möglichen“. Rekombinations-Prinzip: erklärt auch nur, was es für MöWe gibt, wenn es gewisse andere gibt. Bsp Wenn es MöWe mit Einhörnern und MöWe mit Göttern gibt, dann gibt es auch MöWe mit beidem ((s)
Problem/Lycan: ob es die Ausgangswelten gibt ((s) Also die Prämissen wahr sind), erfahren wir nicht. (Lycan 1991a,1991b,224f,Divers/Melia 2002,§3).
LewisVsVs/Schwarz: das macht nichts, weil der modale Realismus kein Entscheidungsverfahren ist, um Fragen über MöWe zu beantworten. Nicht alle Fragen sind beantwortbar: Bsp
Wissen/MöWe/Lewis: keine Antwort darüber, was die Existenz verschiedener, aber qualitativ identischer MöWe angeht. (1986e,2214,114).
decision procedure/d.p./Schwarz: Bsp wird vom Behavioristen auch nicht gebraucht: er sagt einfach, Aussagen über mentale Eigenschaften seien auf Aussagen über Dispositionen reduzierbar. Bsp mathematischer Platonismus: braucht kein d.p. für die Arithmetik.

Lyc I
W. G. Lycan
Modality and Meaning

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Jackson Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Frank C. Jackson
V 152
Indicative Conditional/IC/JacksonVsLewis: better theory (Lewis pro): both theories have the following in common: 1) The IC has the truth conditions of the truth-functional conditional A>C. 2) nevertheless, assertibility goes with the conditional subjective probability 3) there is a discrepancy between truth and assertibility-preserving inferences involving indicative conditionals.
V 152/153
4) our intuition about valid inference with conditionals may be applied to the conditionals, but are also meager evidence of validity. 5) The discrepancy between the assertibility of P(C I A) and the probability of the truth of P(A>C) is due to one or the other Gricean implicature. 6) The right approach to do this implicature must depart from the premise that the conditional has the truth conditions of the (truth-functional) A>C (horseshoe).
V 154
Lewis Thesis: "Assert the stronger" theory for conditional probability. Jackson Thesis: "Implicature of robustness": theory for conditional probability. Pro: JacksonVsLewis: E.g. "Fred will not study and even if he does, he will fail." If (according to Lewis) the conditional is only assertible if the antecedent cannot be denied, how can it be that yet both are asserted together? Explanation: the antecedent is added because of the robustness. Even if you believe that I am mistaken in thinking that Fred does not study, you can still believe like me that he will fail. Lewis pro.

Jack I
F. C. Jackson
From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis Oxford 2000
Lewis, D. Benacerraf Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Paul Benacerraf
IV 201
Bedeutung/BenacerrafVsLewis: es sieht so aus, als hätten wir zu willkürlich gewählt. Wie kann man überhaupt bei Bedeutungen wählen? Sie sind einfach Bedeutungen! Das ist ein grundsätzlicher Einwand gegen mengentheoretische Ansätze.
Lewis: wenn einen das stört kann man auch annehmen, dass Bedeutungen sui generis sind.

Bena I
P. Benacerraf
Philosophy of Mathematics 2ed: Selected Readings Cambridge 1984
Lewis, D. Perry Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 170
Mental Content/Content/View/PerryVsLewis/Schwarz: some authors want to keep perspective out of the content (Perry 1977): Thesis: locate perspective differences in the way of givenness: E.g. Fred in Kuala Lumpur, I in Berlin: our content is the same: that it rains on 12 August 2005 in Berlin, but the content is given differently which explains the different behavioral consequences. Def Givenness/Perry/Black: is the function that assigns to every situation the class of worlds in which it is rains at the place and time of the situation.
LewisVsPerry: it makes no difference (1989b, 74, Fn 9). Content is simply the class of situations to which a true proposition is assigned.
Perspective/Lewis: on the other hand, it is not possible to reconstruct the perspective proposition from Lewis' content.
Perry: thus has an additional content component.
Lewis: which is not needed with him.
Perspective/Uncentered World/Perry/Schwarz: Perry has other tasks in mind: the uncentered content component should help with the semantics of beliefs and explain why Fred and I intuitively believe the same thing.
LewisVsPerry: doubts that this is possible: semantics: when it comes to our intuitions about "meaning the same thing", they are more vague and complicated. E.g. there is a good sense in which Fred and I mean the same thing, if he believes that it rains where he is! E.g. "I wish it would rain" - "I wish the same thing." For this classes of possible situations are sufficient.
- - -
Stalnaker I 255
Def Belief/Conviction/Self//Stalnaker: having a conviction with a given property means to attribute this property to yourself. Belief/Lewis: (not based on the self): believe that φ (φ being a proposition) = attributing the property of living in a possible world φ to yourself.
Self/Semantic Diagnostic/PerryVsLewis/Stalnaker: provides no content of a self-attribution, but distinguishes belief content from belief state.
Relativized Proposition/Perry: classify believers: we have the same belief state in common if we both have the belief, e.g. "I am a philosopher." That corresponds set-centered possible worlds.

Perr I
J. R. Perry
Identity, Personal Identity, and the Self 2002

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Lewis, D. Inwagen, Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 227
Metaphysik/Wesen/wesentlich/van InwagenVsLewis/StalnakerVsLewis: Wissen über kontingente Tatsachen über die aktuelle Situation wäre prinzipiell nicht hinreichend, um alle a posteriori Notwendigkeiten zu kennen: Def starke Notwendigkeit/Chalmers: These: neben substantiellen kontingenten Wahrheiten gibt es auch substantielle modale Wahrheiten: Bsp dass Kripke essentiell ein Mensch ist, Bsp dass Schmerz essentiell identisch mit XY ist.
Pointe: Kenntnis kontingenter Tatsachen ist nicht hinreichend, um diese modalen Tatsachen zu erkennen. Wie erkennen wir sie, vielleicht können wir das nicht (van Inwagen 1998) oder nur hypothetisch durch methodologische Erwägungen (Block/Stalnaker 1999).

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Bowie Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
V 42
Ähnlichkeit/Ähnlichkeitsrelation/sim.r./Ähnlichkeitsmetrik/Mögliche Welten/MöWe/Lewis: Problem: man sollte nicht denken, dass irgendeine spezielle Ähnlichkeitsrelation (sim.r.) an die man gerade denkt, in einer allgemeinen Ähnlichkeit ein bestimmtes Gewicht haben sollte. Bsp Grueness trägt nichts zur Ähnlichkeit vor dem Zeitpunkt t bei! (>grue).
Bsp was für eine Ähnlichkeit der Schriften von Wittgenstein und Heidegger sollte irgendwie zählen? Die Zahl der Vokale? Absurd.
BowieVsLewis: wenn einige Vergleichsaspekte aber gar nichts zählen sollten, dann wäre die "Zentrierungsannahme" verletzt: d.h. Welten die in einer nicht beachteten Hinsicht abweichen, müssten als identisch mit unserer wirklichen Welt zählen.
LewisVsVs: es gibt keine Welten, die sich nur in solchen Hinsichten von unserer unterscheiden, die nichts zählen, auch wenn sie sich unter anderem in solchen Hinsichten von unserer unterscheiden. Die Hinsichten mögen auch nicht völlig trennbar sein.
Weiteres Problem: es ist allzu leicht, Unterscheidungen zu treffen und dann anzunehmen, dass sie allen Zwecken genügten! Wir müssen unterscheiden zwischen ganz verschiedenen sim.r., solchen, die offensichtliche Urteile beeinflussen, und solchen, die kontrafaktische Urteile beeinflussen.
Wenn wir das nicht unterscheiden, gibt es ein Argument:
VsA 2: manchmal scheint ein solches Paar von kontrafaktischen Konditionalen (KoKo) wahr zu sein: "Wenn A, wäre die Welt sehr verschieden von unserer, aber wenn A und B, dann nicht sehr verschieden".
Lösung: man muss sim.r. für explizite Urteile von sim.r. für kontrafaktische Urteile unterscheiden!
V 43
Es könnten sogar in der Interpretation eines einzigen Satzes solche ganz verschiedenen sim.r. auftauchen. Wir sollten uns nicht zuerst für eine Ähnlichkeitsart entscheiden und dann anschließend A2 damit testen. Damit würden wir bloß eine Kombination von A2 mit einer absurden Annahme über die Konstanz von Ähnlichkeit testen.
Stattdessen müssen wir die richtige sim.r. dadurch finden, dass wir unser Wissen über Wahrheit und Falschheit von KoKo benutzen, um zusammen mit A 2 die richtigen Wahrheitsbedingungen zu finden. Diese Kombination kann dann entgegen unserem Wissen über KoKo unabhängig getestet werden, nicht A 2 allein.
Lewis, D. Levy Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
V 117
Isaac LeviVsLewis: +
V 118
Selbst wenn wir Fluktuationen der Rahmenbedingungen zulassen, werden wir doch nicht erlauben, dass es so dramatische Auswirkungen haben wird, wie, dass 0 oder 1 als Wahrscheinlichkeit (Wschk) für Münzwürfe herauskommt. Lewis: wie bringe ich dann also die Annahme von 50 % zusammen mit der Tatsache, dass es auch Null oder 1 oder etwas in der Nähe davon sein kann?
Ich bringe das nicht zusammen! Wenn die Chance bei Null oder 1 oder in der Nähe ist, kann sie nicht bei 50 % liegen.
Auf die Frage, wie Zufall mit Determinismus vereinbart werden kann oder wie weit auseinander liegende Chancen zusammengebracht werden können muss ich antworten, sie können nicht zusammengebracht werden.
Wschk/Lewis: im Aufsatz hatte ich nur ein "hypothetisches Sie" angenommen, für jemand, der eine Chance von 50 % zuschreibt!
Ich selbst würde auch eine geringe Menge von Überzeugungen für die Extreme zuschreiben! ((s) nur verständlich als Subjektivismus: mehrere Propositionen gleichzeitig nebeneinander aufrechterhalten).

Zufall/Determinismus/Lewis: ich gebe den Extremen eine kleine Chance, das spiegelt meine Ungewissheit wider, ob die Welt überhaupt Zufall zulässt.
Aber zum größten Teil bin ich doch überzeugt davon, dass in der Mikrophysik eine Menge Zufallsprozesse ablaufen.
LewisVsLevi: er schafft eine künstliche Situation, wo der Münzwurf von solchen Prozessen abgekoppelt ist, das ist kaum möglich.

Levy I
I. Levy
Gambling With Truth an Essay of Induction and the Aims of Science Cambridge 1974
Lewis, D. Collins Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 141
Verursachung/CollinsVsLewis: (2000,230f): Inflation von Verursachungen!
Schw I 142
Damit wird das Thema gewechselt! Sicher kann ein Ereignis kausalen Einfluss haben, ohne selbst Ursache zu sein.

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Shaffer Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 142
Verursachung/SchafferVsLewis: (2001a:15f) Verursachung ohne Einfluss: Bsp der Knopfdruck eines Bahnangestellten stellt die Weiche falsch, es kommt zwei Stunden später zum Unfall. Problem: wenn der Knopfdruck ein wenig anders gewesen wäre, etwas fester, etwas später usw. hätte sich nichts geändert.
Lösung/Lewis: Einfluss, bei dem nur zwei Variationen der Ursache mit zwei Variationen der Wirkung einhergehen. Variation: Abwesenheit des Knopfdrucks.
SchwarzVsLewis: das ist aber dann keine „nicht zu sehr abweichende Variation“. Und außerdem existieren ja Abwesenheiten nach Lewis gar nicht.
Abwesenheit/Lewis: entspricht einer negativen Existenzaussage.
SchwarzVsLewis: leider hält er sich nicht daran! Ständig tauchen Abwesenheiten auf, die man nicht leicht mit negativen Existenzaussagen loswird. Soll dann über negative Existenzaussagen quantifiziert werden?
- - -
Schwarz I 183
Wissen/Evidenz/SchafferVsLewis: (Schaffer 2001c): das Modell ist zu einfach. Bsp ich sehe bei einer DNA- Analyse eines Pilzes zu. Die mir vorliegende Evidenz impliziert, dass es sich um einen xxx handelt. Deshalb brauche ich aber nicht zu wissen, dass der Pilz ein xxx ist. Das ist das alte Problem der logischen Allwissenheit: wir wissen nicht alle Konsequenzen von allem, was wir wissen,. Lewis Wissensanalyse liefert nun eine Bestimmung unserer epistemischen Alternativen, der möglichen Individuen, die - nach allem was wir wissen - wir sein könnten.
Semantik der Wissenszuschreibung: steht nun auf einem anderen Blatt: sie ist komplizierter: Bsp wenn wir aus der Küche gefragt werden, ob der Kandidat der Quizsendung die richtige Antwort hatte kommt es uns nicht darauf an, ob die Antwort wirklich gerechtfertigt war (Ernst 2002,83 113). Er könnte auch nur geraten haben. In anderen Kontexten sind die Anforderungen aber viel stärker, so dass wir uns fragen können, ob wir überhaupt etwas wissen > Skeptizismus.

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Menzies Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 136
Def kontrafaktische Abhängigkeit/Lewis: (1986f,184): Modifikation: neu: B ist kontrafaktisch abhängig von A, wenn die Wahrscheinlichkeit (Wschk), dass B eintritt (relativ zu einer Zeit nach dem tatsächlichen Eintreten von A) ohne das Eintreten von A deutlich niedriger gewesen wäre.
Schw I 137
Peter MenziesVsLewis: (1989,1996): das hat noch mehr Probleme mit ausgeschalteten Ursachen: Bsp eine Verbindung zwischen Neuron A und Neuron C ist sehr verlässlich, nicht aber die zwischen B und C. Bs Erregung blockiert As Signal, wenn A und B gleichzeitig aktiv sind. Wenn nun zufällig die Verbindung B C einmal funktionier, wird C erregt. Die Erregung ist durch Bs Erregung verursacht, nicht durch As. Ihre Wschk wird aber durch die Erregung von B gesenkt und durch die von A erhöht. Daher ist Lewis’ Bedingung weder hinreichend noch notwendig für indeterministische Verursachung. Lewis dito, aber keine Lösung. Ursache/VsLewis: viele Autoren stören sich an der Transitivität von Lewis’ Ursachen Begriff. Bsp (Kvart 1991): ein Mann verliert bei einem Unfall seinen Finger, der erfolgreich wieder angenäht wird und drei Monate später wieder funktioniert. Nach Lewis verursacht der Unfall die Funktionsfähigkeit.
LewisVsVs: manche Ereignisfolgen sind eben intuitiv merkwürdig, obwohl sie (wie hier) stimmen. (2004a: 98 100).

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Lewis, D. Meixner Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 58
Description/Properties/Necessary/Contingent/Individual/INDIVIDUAL/Meixner: E.g. "the President of the USA in 2002" denotes the individual George W. Bush.
I 59
The same description can also be conceived for a initial-property maximally consistent individual, namely for "george w. bush". Bush and bush have exactly the same initial properties (but "have" in a different sense). Point: while Bush might very easily not have had the property of being president, bush needs to have this property!
Meixner: This can be easily confused and has been confused at least twice in the history of philosophy:
1) in Leibniz.
2) MeixnerVsLewis: Confusion of individual and INDIVIDUAL in his counterpart theory: the individual has its properties contingently ((s) a singled out counterpart needs its properties as such, because it is individuated by the set of these properties.) INDIVIDUAL/Leibniz/Meixner: For the Leibnizian, the individual Bush is identical with the INDIVIDUAL bush ((s) because the two (in that particular moment) are indistinguishable).
PoWo: but Leibniz says the reason why Bush might as well not have been president is that his counterpart bush is not president!
---
I 139
Part/Constituent/Meixner: E.g. we are not parts, but indeed constituents of facts. MeixnerVsLewis: therefore, he cannot consider possible worlds (PoWo) as facts.
I 144
Actuality Relativism/AR/Meixner: is forced to consider PoWo as individual-like entities (see above), one of which is highlighted by the fact that it is the only PoWo of which we are parts. This one therefore advances to become the absolutely actual world and all other entities that are absolutely actual are so by being actual within it. MeixnerVs.
Vs: Problem: no counterfactual conditionals like "UM (= Uwe Meixner) could also have studied geography in his life" possible due to our fixation to the real world (actual world).
The fact that UM is a also constituent of another PoWo than w* contradicts the AR, which says that he can only be a constituent of the only actual world w*.
I 145
Because in the individual-like entity of the PoWo (as assumed by the AR), constituents of individual-like entities are only when they are parts of them. To be able to be a constituent also of another PoWo UM would also have to be part of another PoWo than w* and this is impossible according to the AR.
Solution/Lewis: (AR): a counterpart of UM studied geography in a different PoWo.
MeixnerVsLewis: that misses the point of the sentence that UM could have studied geography. It's not about anyone else but me in a PoWo.
KripkeVsLewis/Meixner: Kripke also suggested to Lewis depart from his interpretation, but he never did.
Leibniz pro Lewis: (Letter to Antoine Arnauld): For example, could Adam also have had a different progeny? This can only be affirmed in the following sense: God was free to create another Adam (counterpart). That would then have been another PoWo (certainly not the best of all worlds).
Nevertheless, Leibniz is not an AR.
II 146
Absolute Actuality/Leibniz: is something lent by God and around it there is one single matching PoWo. Meixner: Absolute actuality is then not a matter of a mere place in "logical space," not a matter of mere positioning within the possible, but
The possible does not bring forth from itself everything real, it does not shine out of itself in the light of reality everywhere, where it shines in this light, rather it is largely on its own "reality darkness".

Mei I
U. Meixner
Einführung in die Ontologie Darmstadt 2004
Lewis, D. Rescher Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon:
Nicholas Rescher
Schurz I 237
Similarity Metrics/Possible Worlds/p.w./Counterfactual Conditional/co.co./RescherVsLewis/Schurz: (Lewis 1973b): für die Wissenschaftstheorie gibt Lewis’ logische Semantik für co.co. wenig her, denn die inhaltliche Interpretation der Ssimilarity metrics zwischen poss.w. setzt voraus, dass wir schon eine Unterscheidung zwischen Gesetzen und kontingenten Tatsachen kennen. (Stegmüller 1969, 320 334).

Resch I
N. Rescher
Kant and the Reach of Reason: Studies in Kant’s Theory of Rational Systematization Cambridge 2010

Schu I
G. Schurz
Einführung in die Wissenschaftstheorie Darmstadt 2006
Lewis, D. Hausman Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schurz I 240
Umstände/Kausalität/Schurz: Umstände müssen analytisch unabhängig sein. Singuläre Kausalrelation/individual causation/Schurz: hier brauchen wir nicht nur die Ursache, sondern auch die Wirkung (im Gegensatz zum allgemeinen Fall).
probabilistische Kausalität: hier ist (im Gegensatz zur strikten) das Eintreten der Wirkung wesentlich.
EellsVsHausman: (VsHausman’s "Principle G"): in indeterministischen Situationen folgt daraus, dass F in Umständen U G generell verursacht und dass Ereignis Fa unter Umständen Ua eingetreten ist, nicht zwingend, dass auch die Wirkung Ga eingetreten ist, sondern nur mit erhöhter Wahrscheindlichkeit.
Individual Causation/Counterfactual Conditional/co.co./Lewis/Schurz: (Lewis 1973a): durch Rekurs auf similarity metrics zwischen möglichen Welten: ein Ereignis Fa verursachte ein anderes Ga, wenn zutrifft: wäre Fa nicht eingetreten, so wäre auch Ga nicht eingetreten.
HausmanVsLewis: Problem unter anderem: Deutung der similarity metrics.
I 244
interventionistischer Ansatz/probabilistisch/Kausalität/Handlungstheorie/Schurz: der interventionistische Ansatz geht von der Handlungstheorie aus (von Wright, 1974, 73, Menzies, Price 1993): danach ist A die Ursache von B, wenn durch Realisierung von A mit Hilfe einer Handlung H die Wirkung B herbeigeführt werden kann. Das erscheint zirkulär, weil die Herbeiführung durch eine Handlung unerklärt ist. HausmanVsAction theory: (1989): sie sollte durch eine abstrakte kausale intervention theory ersetzt werden. (+)

Hausm
D. M. Hausman
The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology Cambridge 2008

Schu I
G. Schurz
Einführung in die Wissenschaftstheorie Darmstadt 2006
Lewis, D. Wessel Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 304/305
Irreale Bedingungssätze/Kontrafaktische Konditionale/Wessel: der Anspruch, eine allgemeine Konditionaltheorie zu sein, wird im allgemeinen nicht erfüllt. Bsp
(1) Wenn Peter nicht gekommen wäre, wären Paul und Peter nicht gekommen.
(2) Wenn jetzt durch die Spule ein Strom fließen würde...
(3) Selbst wenn der Schamane den Regentanz tanzen würde, würde es nicht regnen.
(4) Wenn Oswald Kennedy nicht erschossen hat, hat es ein anderer getan.
(5) Wenn .....nicht erschossen hätte, hätte..
(6) Wenn Bizet und Verdi Landleute wären, wäre Bizet Italiener
(7) ...wäre Verdi Franzose.

(1) ist vom System der logischen Folgebeziehung (hier FK) abhängig.
(2) hypothetischer Sachverhalt: Solche Aussagen werden zur Explikation des Begriffs "empirisches Gesetz" genutzt.
Def Naturgesetz/Wessel: hier wird behauptet, dass eine wahre allgemeine konditionale Aussage dann ein Gesetz ausdrückt, wenn ihr wahre irreale Konditionalaussagen entsprechen. (>Lewis, Armstrong)
Im Gegensatz dazu trifft eine bloß gesetzesartige Aussage nicht auf alle möglichen Gegenstände zu.
Gesetze wie das von der Spule gelten auch für während der Steinzeit von außerirdischen auf die Erde gebrachte Exemplare.
I 306
Es wird vorausgesetzt, dass die Wahrheit der irrealen Bedingungssätze unabhängig von der Gesetzesaussage festgestellt werden kann. Das ist für irreale Bedingungssätze aber in der Regel schwer. WesselVsArmstrong/WesselVsLewis: These:: der irreale Bedingungs Satz ist von der realen Aussage abhängig.
Gesetzesaussagen stützen und garantieren die Gültigkeit entsprechender irrealer Konditionale und nicht umgekehrt!
ad (3) "selbst wenn": solche Aussagen gelten als wahr, weil das Konsequens "sowieso wahr" ist.
alltagssprachliche Übersetzung:
Bsp "Es ist nicht so, dass es regnet, wenn der Schamane tanzt und er tanzt nicht und es regnet nicht".
I 307
Irreale Bedingungssätze/Wessel: Bsp Oswald/Kennedy (4) ist zweifellos wahr und (5) zweifellos falsch. Wie ist das zu erklären? Mögliche Welten/MöWe/viele Autoren: man muss sich in einen Kontext versetzen, der dem aktuellen Gang der Geschichte möglichst nahe ist. Der ähnliche Kontext (nächste MöWe) ist der, in dem ein anderer Kennedy erschossen hat.
ad (5): hier ist die ähnlichste Welt die, in der, wenn Oswald nicht geschossen hat, dass niemand geschossen hat und Kennedy noch lebt. Daher sei (5) falsch.
WesselVsMöWe/WesselVsLewis: Nachteil: die Auswahl der ähnlichsten Welt muss begründet werden!
I 307
Irreale Bedingungssätze/Kontrafaktisches Konditional/KoKo/Ähnlichkeitsmetrik/Wessel: (5) ist eine versteckte "selbst wenn" Aussage: "Selbst wenn Oswald Kennedy nicht erschossen hätte, wäre Kennedy erschossen worden".
Die Wahrheit solcher aussagen, die in politischen und historischen Kontexten häufig sind, ist schwer festzustellen.
(6)/(7): Bizet/Verdi Bsp/Wessel: Lösung: der Grund für die Entstehung des Paradoxes liegt in der unkontrollierten Verwendung des Prädikats "Landsleute"., und nicht in der Konditionallogik.
Wenn beide Landsleute wären, folgte daraus noch nichts über die konkrete Nationalität beider., ausgenommen: es ist dieselbe. Mit demselben Recht könnte dann beide auch Japaner sein!
Anstelle des zweistelligen Prädikats "Landsleute" sollte man die einstelligen Prädikate "Landsmann von Verdi" und "Landsmann von Bizet" verwenden. ((s) Dann eindeutig: Bizet als Landmann von Verdi müsste Italiener sein.)
I 308
"Immer, wenn jemand Landsmann von Bizet ist, ist er Franzose". Das ist dann gar kein Problem mehr.
Irreale Bedingungssätze/Konditional/Konjunktion/Wessel: jedes Vorkommen eines irr. Bedingungs Satzes kann durch Konjunktionen ersetzt werden, in denen reale Konditionale vorkommen.

We I
H. Wessel
Logik Berlin 1999
Mellor, D.H. Armstrong Vs Mellor, D.H.
 
Books on Amazon
Arm II 34
Strength/Objective opportunity/ArmstrongVsMellor/ArmstrongVsLewis: I believe that the concept of a prop that can only be described as that which constitutes a chance to have a lower level prop, is incoherent. But even if that is not the case, the postulation is a piece of unwanted metaphysics. Saving the ailing regularity theory with this is a weak motif. It has also greatly veered from the original regularity theory.
II 35
MellorVsArmstrong/RamseyVsArmstrong: Mellor follows Ramsey: laws of nature should not be understood as a relation of universals. ArmstrongVsVs: one should not feel too ontologically sure about the introduction of objective opportunities, they are mysterious.

AR II = Disp
D. M. Armstrong

In
Dispositions, Tim Crane, London New York 1996

AR III
D. Armstrong
What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge 1983
Mereology Verschiedene Vs Mereology Schwarz I 34
zeitliche Teile/Mereology/Schwarz: akzeptiert man aber Aggregate aus Sokrates und Eiffelturm, könnte man immer noch bestreiten, dass Sokrates selbst zeitliche Teile hat. Lewis: behauptet selbst auch nicht, dass notwendig alles, was über die Zeit hinweg existiert, aus zeitlichen Teilen besteht (1986f,x,1986e,205,1994 §1) VsStowe: zeitliche Teile sollen keine Analyse zeitüberdauernder Existenz liefern
Lewis: (1083d,76,ähnlich Armstrong 1980,76): Bsp ein Kind, Frieda1 verschwindet plötzlich, während ein anderes Kind, Frieda2 plötzlich auftaucht. Das mag den Naturgesetzen widersprechen, ist aber logisch möglich.
Schw I 35
Vielleicht bemerkt niemand etwas. Und es gäbe ja auch nichts zu bemerken. Vs: das ist nicht überzeugend.
Endurantismus Vs: kann die Prämissen gar nicht akzeptieren.
van InwagenVs: Frieda1 und Frieda2 können nicht so aneinandergereiht existieren und dennoch verschieden bleiben. (2000,398)
Schwarz I 36
Ding/Endurantism VsLewis/Vs Mereology: die Gegenstände sind nicht die mereologische Summe ihrer Teile, weil die Summe und die Teile auch existieren, wenn die Dinge selbst nicht existieren, (z.B. wenn sie zerlegt oder kaputt sind). Vs: dann wird der Begriff „Teil“ nicht genau gebraucht. Die verstreuten Teile sind dann keine Teile mehr, weil das (zerlegte) Fahrrad zu der Zeit nicht existiert.
Lösung/Lewis: Teil des Fahrrads ist nur ein vergangener zeitlicher Teil der Gangschaltung. Personale Identität, zeitliche Identität: auch wir sind nicht identisch mit irgendeinem Aggregat von Molekülen, denn wir tauschen mit dem Stoffwechsel viele davon ständig aus. (1988b, 195).





Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Modal Realism Verschiedene Vs Modal Realism Schwarz I 61
Vs modaler Realismus/VsLewis/Ontologie/Schwarz: (viele Autoren: dieser verkenne das Wesen der Modalität, bereite Skeptizismus, Nihilismus und moralischem Verfall den Boden. Reale Existenz all dieser „Paralleluniversen“ ist völlig unglaubwürdig.
LewisVsVs: das Problem mit dem common sense ist ernst zu nehmen, aber die methodologischen Vorteile der Theorie überwiegen. (1986e:vii)
Lösung/Lewis: Beschränkung der Quantoren: weil wir uns auf unsere Welt beschränken, ist es richtig zu sagen, dass es keine sprechenden Esel gibt.
VsLewis: seine möglichen Welten (MöWe) sind epistemisch unzugänglich. Woher wissen wir, dass es sie gibt? Wir könnten prinzipiell nie etwas über sie erfahren!
LewisVsVs: der Einwand setzt voraus, dass Wissen kausal erworben wird (Kausaltheorie des Wissens) ((s) dass MöWe nicht logisch erforscht werden). Wenn das richtig wäre, hätten wir auch kein mathematisches Wissen. (1986e:109).
Schw I 62
VsLewis: das gilt nur für den mathematischen Platonismus (Lager: Lewis: mathematischer Platonist – FieldVsLewis).
Schw I 64
Modaler Realismus/MöWe/VsLewis/Schwarz: manche: Lewis’ MöWe müssten Teil der Wirklichkeit sein, weil „Wirklichkeit“ , „Welt“ und „Realität“ synonyme Ausdrücke für die Gesamtheit aller Dinge sind. (Plantinga 1976, 256f Lycan 1979, 290): die Idee von realen Dingen außerhalb der Welt ist einfach inkonsistent. Realität/Welt/LewisVsVs: Lewis unterscheidet zwischen Welt und Realität: „wirkliche Welt“ bezeichnet nur einen kleinen Teil aller Dinge (Realität beinhaltet Welt, Welt nur Teil der Realität) . Damit lösen sich die Widersprüche auf.
Schwarz: das ist eine neutrale Formulierung des modalen Realismus. Frage: was soll die Realität raumzeitlich maximaler Gegenstände mit Modalität zu tun haben?
Modalität/van InwagenVsLewis/Schwarz: hier geht es doch darum, wie unsere Welt hätte sein können, nicht darum, wie irgendwelche von uns isolierten Dinge sind. (1885, 119,1986, 226)., Plantinga 1987).
LewisVsVs: Modaloperatoren sind eben Quantoren über solche Dinge.
Van InwagenVsLewis: der Einwand geht tiefer: Bsp Angenommen, es gibt genau 183 raumzeitlich maximale Gegenstände. Das ist nicht analytisch falsch. Es kommt auch kein starrer Designator vor.
Schw I 65
Es könnte also wahr sein oder auch nicht. Lewis scheint zu behaupten, dass es so viele raumzeitlich maximale Gegenstände geben kann wie es Mengen gibt. VsLewis: damit ist die Gesamtheit der Welten kontingent geworden!
Kontingenz/Lewis/Schwarz: dieser muss das vermeiden, weil er ja Kontingenz über MöWe analysieren will. ((s) d.h. Kontingenz heißt, dass es abweichende MöWe gibt, also nicht zuerst die Menge der
MöWe (= raumzeitlich maximale Gegenstände) limitieren und danach sagen, dass das eben die Kontingenz ist, denn dann ist die Kontingenz nicht kontingent begrenzt, weil es dann eine nicht kontingente Grenze wäre, wenn es nur 183 MöWe gibt). (van InwagenVsLewis/PlantingaVsLewis). ((s) wenn es kontingent wäre, könnte man nicht einfach sagen „es gibt 183 MöWe“. Anders: „wie viele Möglichkeiten es gibt, hängt von den Möglichkeiten ab“: zirkulär – wohl aber: Bsp „Wie lange es dauert, hängt von den Möglichkeiten ab: z.B. wie viele Versuche man durchführt. – anders: auch richtig: Bsp wie viele Möglichkeiten es gibt, hängt (nicht von den Möglichkeiten) sondern von den Eigenschaften ab, z.B. wie abnutzbar der betrachtete Gegenstand ist. (Lewis dito).
Kontingenz/Schwarz: heißt ja, dass es abweichende MöWe gibt. Die Gesamtheit aller MöWe existiert aber nicht in einzelnen Welten. Daher kann die Gesamtheit selbst nicht anders sein, als sie ist! (s) Die Gesamtheit ist nicht Gegenstand der Betrachtung in einer MöWe.)
Gesamtheit/Modallogik/Lewis/Schwarz: unbeschränkte Aussagen über MöWe sind unbeschränkte modale Aussagen ((s) Verschiebung des Bereichs dann nicht möglich! s.o.) .
Schwarz: als solche entziehen sie sich dem Einfluss von Modaloperatoren:
Bsp „Es gibt eine MöWe, in der Esel sprechen können“ ist äquivalent mit:
„N Es gibt eine MöWe, in der Esel sprechen können“. Und mit
„M Es gibt eine MöWe, in der Esel sprechen können“.
(s) logische Form: Mp > NMp. (S5). Mp > MMp. (weder T noch S4, Reduktionsgesetz, > Hughes/Cresswell I 34)).
modaler Realismus/VsLewis/Schwarz. Problem: wie die Nicht Kontingenz der MöWe mit ihrer Charakterisierung als Paralleluniversen zusammenpasst.
Kontingenz/Lewis/Schwarz: entweder wir reden über die Gesamtheit der Realität: dann ist die Zahl der Möwe nicht kontingent – oder wir reden über die Wirklichkeit ((s) WiWe), dann gibt es notwendigerweise nur ein einziges Universum (denn in jeder Welt gibt es nur eins, die Welt selbst).
Kontingenz/Schwarz: empirisches Problem: nach der RT könnten zwei Universen durch ein Wurmloch verbunden werden. Aber es ist kontingent, ob das auftritt.
LewisVs: das ist absolut unmöglich! ((s) Problem: man müsste vor dem Wurmloch schon behaupten, dass es zwei Universen gibt, die verbunden werden können, und das wäre eine Aussage über die (weitere) Realität und nicht über die (engere) Wirklichkeit (=WiWe) (in der es nur ein Universum geben kann). (1986e:71f)
Anmerkung: das ist das „Inseluniversen“ (Richards 1975,107f, Bigelow/Pargetter 1987).
Inseluniversen/Bricker: (2001,35 39): (völlig andere Version: Rekombinations-Prinzip: danach gibt es eine MöWe w, die ein Duplikat der mereologischen Summe aus Hume und Lewis enthält und sonst nichts – auch keine Raumzeit zwischen dem Hume Duplikat und dem Lewis Duplikat. Folglich enthält w zwei raumzeitlich isolierte Teile.
SchwarzVsBricker: das setzt voraus, dass raumzeitliche Relationen notwendig substantielle Raumzeit erfordern. ((s) >Substantivalism).
Lösung/Lewis/Schwarz: (1986e,72) Ersatz Möglichkeit: seine Theorie erlaubt Welten, in denen mehrere vierdimensionale Universen nur entlang einer zusätzlichen fünften Dimension verbunden sind, in den vier normale Dimensionen aber isoliert sind. Wenn das nicht geht, müssen wir das Kriterium der raumzeitlichen Verbundenheit lockern.
Schw I 66
zwei Alternativen: (1986f, 74f) a) Welten sind durch Relationen verbunden, die den raumzeitlichen Relationen analog sind.
b) die Bewohner einer MöWe stehen zueinander in beliebigen perfekt natürlichen externen Relationen.
Schwarz: raumzeitlicher Abstand ist aber das einzig klare Beispiel dafür.
SchwarzVsLewis: das löst das allgemeine Problem nicht: dass die Dinge (Gesamtheit der MöWe) eben auch anders sein könnte.
Schwarz I 68
Vs modaler Realismus/Schwarz: ontologische Überfrachtung. Alternativen: a) „ersatz worlds“ – b) Fiktionalismus. Def ersatz world/Ersatzismus/ersatzism/Terminologie/Lewis: versucht, mögliche Welten durch Satzmengen oder Sachverhalte zu ersetzen.
Def Fiktionalismus/Vs modaler Realismus/Schwarz: hier kommen bei der Interpretation von Sätzen über (MöWe) gar keine speziellen Entitäten ins Spiel.





Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Modal Realism Bigelow Vs Modal Realism
 
Books on Amazon
I 203
Modal realism/Bigelow/Pargetter: BigelowVs concrete modal realism. But there are many things that can be done with possible worlds in any case, whether they concretely exist or not.
I 187
Modal realism//Lewis/Bigelow/Pargetter. His extremely concrete MR has the advantage that it would explain a lot of things if it were true. And most also agree on that. Why has the incredulous look not disappeared then? His theory has nothing irrational either. VsLewis: in order to refute him one of two strategies would have to be assumed: 1) the initial probability is 0 (instead of slightly above) 2) even if the prob. grows in the course, the increase would be infinitesimal. Ad 1): prob. can just not increase starting from 0. Nevertheless, the question remains whether it is ever rational to attribute a prob. of 0. In particular, not Lewis’ theory: LewisVsVs: that would lead to a trilemma: (1) the opponents might recognize that a greater intelligence than themselves thought about it for a longer period of time and therefore the prob. is> 0 and that he means what he says (2) They might assume that he does not mean what he says (3) They could say that it is sometimes rational,
I 188 Attributing a prob. of 0 to something which a serious and intelligent entity has said.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Modal Realism Stalnaker Vs Modal Realism
 
Books on Amazon
Stalnaker I 36
Proposition/closeness/Stalnaker: whatever propositions are, if there are any at all, there are also sets of them. And for each set of propositions it is definitely true or false, that all of its elements are true. And this is of course again a proposition.
(W5) Closeness-condition: for each set of propositions G there is a proposition A so that G implies A and A implies every element of G.
Stalnaker: that means that for each set of propositions there is a proposition that says that every proposition in the set is true.
So I suppose that the world-stories-theorists wants to add (W5) to his theory.
(W6) Equivalent propositions are identical.
Problem: the problems of (W6) are known. ((s) > hyperintensionalism/ hyperintensionality): propositions that are true in the same worlds are indistinguishable, VsPossible worlds semantics).
I 40
modal realism/MR/Lewis/Stalnaker: by Lewis the actual world (act. wrld.) is only a real part of a reality which consists of many parallel universes which are spatially and temporally separated. Actual world/Lewis/Stalnaker: is then indexically defined as the part that is related to us.
Unrealized possibilities/Possibilia/Lewis/Stalnaker: then actually exists, but in another part of the reality. Its non-actuality only exists in its localisation somewhere else.
((s) This is only a polemical presentation: Localization must be more than "somewhere else". Localization may be not carried out by us for areas that do are not related to us because we have then no knowledge.)
Modal Realism/MR/Stalnaker: divides into
1. semantic thesis: assertions about what is possible and necessary, should be analyzed in concepts about what is true in some or all parts of reality
2. metaphysical thesis: about the existence of possible worlds (poss.w.).
Semantic MR/Stalnaker: problem: VsMR it could be argued that it is not possible to know the metaphysical facts about it even if the semantic part was true.
I 41
Lewis: there is a parallel here to Benacerraf's dilemma of mathematical truth and knowledge.
I 42
EpistemologyVsModal Realism/Stalnaker: the representatives of the epistemological argument against the MR reject the parallel between mathematical objects and realistically construed possibilia. They insist that reference and knowledge require causal relation of concrete things even if that does not apply for abstract things (numbers etc.). Knowledge/LewisVs: why should the limit between what for knowledge and reference requires a causal relation to be made in concepts of the distinction abstract/concrete?
Knowledge/Lewis: instead we should say that reference and knowledge require a causal relation of contigent facts but not the one of modal reality (knowledge about what is possible and necessary).
Modal Realism/knowledge/Lewis: thesis: in the context of MR, we can say that indexical knowledge requires causal relation, but impersonal knowledge does not.
I 43
Platonism/mathematics/Stalnaker: pro Lewis: here knowledge does not have to be based on a causal relation. Then Benacerraf's dilemma can be solved. EpistemologyVsModal realism/Stalnaker: but I still feel the force of the epistemological argument VsMR.
Reference/knowledge/Stalnaker: problem: to explain the difference between knowledge and reference to numbers, sets and cabbages and so on.
I 49
Possible worlds/pos.w./MR/Vsmodal realism/knowledge/verificationism/StalnakerVsLewis: the modal realist can cite no verificationist principles for what he calls his knowledge. Conclusion: problem: the MR cannot say on the one hand that poss.w. things are of the same kind (contingent physical objects) like the real world and say on the other side that poss.w. things are of what we know in the same kind as of numbers, sets, functions. ((s) The latter are not "real" things).

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Modalities Lewis Vs Modalities
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 228
Möglichkeit/starke Notwendigkeit/Metaphysik/Chalmers/VsLewis/Schwarz: Anhänger der starken Notwendigkeiten trennen zwischen metaphysischen Möglichkeiten und „epistemischen“ oder „doxastischen" Möglichkeiten. MöWe/Lewis: für die Aufgaben, die Lewis MöWe zuweist, muss es für jede Weise, wie nach allem, was wir wissen, die Dinge sein könnten, eine MöWe geben. Nur einige dieser Möglichkeiten sind aber wirklich metaphysisch möglich.
metaphysische Modalität/Schwarz: ist danach eine im Vergleich zu Lewis Modalität eine beschränkte.
LewisVs starke Notwendigkeit/Schwarz: ihre Anhänger erklären nicht, wo die Trennlinie verlaufen soll. Bsp wenn jemand die metaphysische Notwendigkeit der Existenz von Eierbechern dadurch verteidigen wollte, dass er „metaphysisch möglich“ nur auf MöWe anwendet, in denen es Eierbecher gibt, wäre das nicht interessant.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Montague, R. Lewis Vs Montague, R.
 
Books on Amazon
I 10
Erlebnis: nicht identisch mit der Eigenschaft, die man jemandem dadurch zu spricht, dass man sagt, er habe dieses Erlebnis. Erlebnis: derjenige Zustand, der eine gewisse definierende kausale Rolle innehat.
Eigenschaft: eben die Eigenschaft, sich in dem Zustand zu befinden.
Bsp Schmerzen sind nicht identisch mit der Eigenschaft, Schmerzen zu haben! »Schmerz« ist ein kontingenter Name, das heißt, er hat in verschiedenen möglichen Welten verschiedene Denotationen. (Nicht starr).
»Die Eigenschaft, Schmerzen zu haben«, ist demgegenüber ein nicht-kontingenter Name. (Starr, in jeder möglichen Welt das gleiche).( I 11 + MontagueVsLewis,LewisVsMontague).
- - -
V 37
Def Determinismus/mögliche Welten/MöWe/Lewis: wenn zwei MöWe den Gesetzen perfekt gehorchen, dann sind sie entweder exakt gleich durch die ganze Zeit oder in keinen zwei Zeitabschnitte gleich. Nehmen wir um des Arguments willen einmal an, dass die Naturgesetze deterministisch seien. Meine Definition von Determinismus rührt von Montague her, weicht aber in zwei Punkten von im ab:
LewisVsMontague:
1. ich vermeide seine mathematische Konstruktion von ersatz worlds ((s) anderswo: = Mengen von Sätzen)). 2. Ich nehme zeitweise Gleichheit von Welten als einfache Relation. Montague statt dessen nimmt die Relation, dieselbe vollständige Beschreibung in einer bestimmten Sprache zu haben, als Grundrelation, die er unspezifisch lässt.
Meine Definition setzt voraus, dass wir verschiedene Zeitabschnitte von einer Welt zur anderen identifizieren können.
V 246
Def Ereignis/Richard/Montague/Lewis: (1969) bestimmte Eigenschaften von Zeit. Das Ereignis geschieht zu einer bestimmten Zeit in einer bestimmten MöWe dann und nur dann, wenn das Ereignis zu der Welt und zu der Zeit gehört. D.h. das Ereignis wird mit der Eigenschaft identifiziert, eine Zeit zu sein, wann das Ereignis geschieht.
LewisVsMontague: ich denke, mein Ansatz hat zwei kleinere Vorzüge:
1. in der Relativitätstheorie ist es nicht immer klar, was Zeit überhaupt ist,
2. Angenommen, ein Montague Ereignis geschieht zu einer bestimmten Zeit in einer bestimmten Möwe, dann müssen wir den Ort erst finden. Bei meinem Ansatz ist die Region sofort gegeben.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Nominalism Lewis Vs Nominalism
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 94
Eigenschaften/Mengenlehre//Lewis/Schwarz: wie ist es dann zu verstehen, dass Identität transitiv ist, Elementschaft aber nicht? Das muss Lewis uminterpretieren: Identität/Lewis: dass sie transitiv ist, heißt nur, dass immer wenn A = B und B = C, dann auch A = C.
SchwarzVsLewis: damit fällt LewisVs Nominalismus: dieser wolle „alle Sätze über Eigenschaften irgendwie uminterpretieren“ dieser Vorwurf fällt damit auf Lewis selbst zurück.
Schwarz: aber vor diesem Problem steht jeder, der eine konsistente Theorie von Eigenschaften vertreten möchte. Es hilft z.B. nicht, Eigenschaften als irreduzible abstrakte Entitäten aufzufassen: auch dann kann es die Russell Eigenschaft ((s) nicht auf sich selbst zuzutreffen) nicht geben.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Parfit, D. Lewis Vs Parfit, D.
 
Books on Amazon
IV 55
Identität/Kontinuität/Überleben/Person/Lewis: Problem: wir haben eine Frage gestellt und zwei Antworten bekommen: a) Identität: kann nur totale Identität sein
b) Kontinuität: kann graduell sein.
Welches von beidem soll denn nun relevant sein beim Überleben?
Wenn wir wählen müssten, sollten wir die alltagssprachliche Platitüde vor der philosophischen Spitzfindigkeit bevorzugen.
Die einzige Hoffnung ist, dass Identitätssicht und Kontinuitäts Version irgendwie zu versöhnen sind. Das möchte ich VsParfit verteidigen.
IV 57
Identität/Kontinuität/Überleben/Person/Parfit: These: nicht beide Antworten (Kontinuität und Identität) können richtig sein, daher müssen wir wählen. a) Identität: ist eine Relation mit einem bestimmten formalen Charakter: sie ist eins zu eins und kann nicht graduell sein.
b) Kontinuität: (und Verbundenheit) (z.B. in Bezug auf Mentales) kann eins zu vielen oder vieles zu eins sowie graduell sein.
Parfit: deswegen ist es die Kontinuität und Verbundenheit, die bei der personalen (temporalen) Identität (Überleben) relevant ist.
c) was beim Überleben wichtig ist, ist also nicht Identität! Höchstens eine Relation die soweit mit Identität zusammenfällt, dass Problemfälle nicht auftreten.
LewisVsParfit: jemand anderes könnte das Argument genauso gut in der anderen Richtung vertreten, und Identität als relevant hinstellen. Und natürlich ist die Identität das. worauf es letztlich ankommt! Daher muss man die Divergenz zwischen a) und b) beseitigt werden!
Ich stimme mit Parfit überein, dass Kontinuität und Verbundenheit ausschlaggebend ist, aber sie ist eben nicht als Alternative zur Identität zu sehen.
Grenzfall/Parfit: Problem: Grenzfälle müssen irgendwie willkürlich entschieden werden.
Identität/Kontinuität/Überleben/Person/LewisVsParfit: die Opposition zwischen Identität und Kontinuität ist falsch.
Intuitiv geht es auf jeden Fall um Identität. Und zwar um buchstäbliche!
Def Identität/Lewis: die Relation, in der alles zu sich selbst und zu nichts anderem steht. …+… R-relation, I-Relation
IV 58
Def R Relation/Identität/Kontinuität/Person/Lewis: eine bestimmte Relation und Verbundenheit unter Person Zuständen. Def I Relation/Lewis: Frage: welche der dauerhaften Personen sind identisch mit den früheren?
Aber genauso gibt es natürlich auch I Relationen zwischen den einzelnen Zuständen!
IV 73
ParfitVsLewis: man sollte unsere gemeinsamen Ansichten nicht mit dem common sense kreuzen. D.h. es geht um einen anderen Sinn von Überleben.
Bsp kurz nach der Spaltung stirbt eine der beiden dP (continuants), die andere lebt noch sehr lange.
S sei der zu t0 (vor der Spaltung) geteilte Zustand, aber nachdem gewußt wird, dass die Spaltung stattfinden wird. Dann ist der Gedanke, der in S gefunden wir der Wunsch nach überleben, und zwar äußerst common sense mäßig und ganz unphilosophisch.
Da S ein geteilter Zustand (Stadium) ist, ist es auch ein geteilter Wunsch.
Problem: C2 hat das Überleben, das er sich erwünscht und es kommt ja auf mentale Kontinuität und Verbundenheit an. (RR) aber wie sieht es für C1 (den früh sterbenden continuant) aus?
IV 74
Lewis: ich hatte geschrieben, worauf es ankommt, ist die Identität beim Überleben. Dann ist für den kurz lebenden C1 das Stadium S zu t0 tatsächlich Ir zu Zuständen in der fernen Zukunft wie z.B. S2, nämlich über den lang lebenden C2! ParfitVsLewis: "Aber ist das nicht die falsche Person?"
Lewis: tatsächlich, wenn C1 wirklich den Wunsch hat, dass er selbst (C1) überlebt, dann ist dieser Wunsch nicht erfüllt.
(Lewis geht aber auf das schwierigere Problem ein):
LewisVsParfit: aber ich glaube, er kann diesen Wunsch gar nicht haben! es gibt eine Grenze für alltagspsychologische Wünsche unter Bedingungen geteilter Zustände.
Der geteilte Zustand S denkt für beide. Jeder Gedanke, den er hat, muss geteilt werden. er kann nicht eine Sache im Namen von C1 und eine Sache im Namen von C2 denken.
Wenn andererseits C1 und C2 alltagsverständlich etwas teilen sollen, dann muss es ein "pluraler" Wunsch sein, "laß uns überleben".
Hier müssen wir nun zwischen zwei pluralen Wünschen unterscheiden:
a) schwach: laß wenigstens einen von uns überleben
b) stark: laß uns beide überleben.
Weil diese Wünsche plural und nicht singulär sind, sind sie nicht common sense. Und zwar, weil alltagspsychologisches Überleben eher in Begriffen des Überlebens von dP als von Relationen von Zuständen verstanden wird.
Der schwache Wunsch von C1 entspricht dem Wunsch nach IR für zukünftige Zustände. Dann entspricht die IR auch der RR. und dem entsprechenden Wunsch.
Wenn C1ens Wunsch stark ist, wird er nicht befriedigt. Dann entspricht er auch nicht dem "philosophischen Wunsch"
IV 75
nach RR für zukünftige Stadien und Parfit hat recht VsLewis. LewisVsParfit: aber sollten wir sagen, dass C1 überhaut diesen starken Wunsch hat? Ich denke, nein. Denn wenn C1 ihn haben kann, kann ihn auch C2 haben.
Bsp Angenommen, (nach Justin Leiber): ein Wunsch wird von Zeit zu Zeit aufgezeichnet, nach gewisser Zeit aber wieder gelöscht. Das entspricht dem schwachen Wunsch nach Überleben, aber nicht dem starken. Angenommen, die Aufnahme erfolgt zur Zeit der Spaltung, C1 stirbt kurz danach durch einen Unfall. C2, überlebt.
Zusätzliche Komplikation: C" erlebt danach eine Körper-Transplantation. Wenn Ihr Wunsch zu überleben dann erfüllt sein soll, ist er überwiegend der schwache Wunsch.
Person/Überleben/Identität/LewisVsParfit: Bsp bis jetzt hatten wir angenommen, dass beide vor der Spaltung wissen, dass es zur Spaltung kommen wird. Jetzt
Angenommen (Variante): beide wissen nicht von der kommenden Spaltung.
Frage: können wie dann nicht doch perfekt den Wunsch teilen: "Laß mich überleben"?.
Problem: dass C1 und C2 den Wunsch teilen beruht auf der falschen Präsupposition, dass sie eine Person sind. D.h. das "mich" ist eine falsche Kennzeichnung. Es kann sich nicht auf C1 in C1’ Gedanken und nicht auf C2 in dessen Gedanken beziehen. Denn diese Gedanken sind ein und derselbe.
Vs: aber ihr Wunsch zu überleben ist erfüllt! Zumindest der von C2 und der von C1 ist ja nicht unterschieden. Dann kann ihr Wunsch nicht nur in dem unerfüllbaren singulären Wunsch bestehen. Sie müssen beide auch den schwachen pluralen Wunsch haben, auch wenn sie die Spaltung nicht vorher wissen.
Pointe: das gilt dann auch für uns alle, obwohl wir nicht oft gespalten werden, sind viele unserer gegenwärtigen Wünsche sind keine aktuellen Vorkommnisse:
Bsp
Der Wunsch vor unvorstellbaren Schmerzen verschont zu bleiben.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Perry, J. Lewis Vs Perry, J.
 
Books on Amazon
IV 70
Person/Identität/Spaltung/Perry/Lewis: wir beide haben dasselbe Ziel, aber verschiedene Prioritäten. Perry: gebraucht nicht die zeitliche Identität (Identität zu t). Er erlaubt nicht die Identifikation der I-Relation (IR) und der R-Relation (RR) sondern nur von gewissen zeitlichen Unterrelationen von ihnen.
LewisVsPerry: dazu muss er eine unintuitive Unterscheidung zwischen Personen, die zu verschiedenen Zeiten existieren (Zustände haben) einführen. ((s) >Castaneda: "flüchtige Iche").
Alle Personen sind bestimmbar zu einer Zeit (außer den Problemfällen).
Bsp Stadium S1 sei R relativiert zu t kurz R1r in Bezug auf S2 dann und nur dann, wenn S1 und S2 Rr simpliciter sind, und auch S2 zu t lokalisiert ist. Dann ist die R1Relation die R Relation zwischen Stadien zu t und anderen Stadien zu anderen Zeiten oder zu t.
IV 71
Und S1 ist Ir zu t kurz I1 relativ auf S2 wenn beide S1 und S2 Stadien einer dP sind, die bestimmbar zu t ist und S2 zu t lokalisiert ist. Dabei müssen wir e.p. auslassen, die nicht zu t bestimmbar sind. Enduring Person/Perry: (continuant, e.p.): ein C ist eine e.p. wenn für ein Person Stadium S, lokalisiert zu t, C das Aggregat ist, das alle und nur Stadien umfasst, die Rtr auf S sind.
Allgemein, eine dP ist ein continuant, der zu einer Zeit bestimmbar ist. Niemand ist zu dauerhafter Unidentifizierbarkeit verurteilt.
Def Lebenszeit/Perry: enduring Person, (continuant).
Def Zweig/Terminologie/Perry: maximal R korreliertes Aggregat von Person Stadien (genau das, was ich eine dP nenne).
Spaltung: hier sind einige Lebenszeiten keine Zweige. Das ganze ist eine Lebenszeit (kein Zweig) die bestimmbar ist zu t0 (vor der Spaltung). C1 und C2 sind noch gar nicht unterscheidbar, während C nicht mehr bestimmbar ist zu t1 (nach der Spaltung).
PerryVsLewis: These: die RR ist nicht dasselbe wie die IR (in diesem Fall). Denn C ist eine Lebenszeit und dann sind nach Perry S1 und S2 I r, aber wegen der Spaltung nicht R r.
Daraus folgt, dass für jede Zeit t die RtR dieselbe wie die I1R ist.
Lewis: vielleicht genügt das, dann jede Frage nach dem Überleben oder der Identität entsteht ja zu einer bestimmten Zeit! D.h. zu t sind nur die RtR und ItR relevant.
Es ist harmlos, dass S1 und S2 Ir sind weil sie weder It0 noch It1r noch überhaupt Itr zu irgendeiner Zeit t sind.
Perry These: jedes Person Stadium zu einer Zeit muss zu genau einer dP bestimmbar zu der Zeit gehören. Personen können wohlgemerkt Stadien teilen:
Bsp Spaltung: S gehört zu drei Lebenszeiten: C, C1, C2 aber nur zu zwei Zweigen: C1 und C2. S1 gehört zu zwei LZ C und C1 aber nur zu einem Zweig: C1.
Stadien/Perry: werden aber nur dann geteilt, wenn alle bis auf einen Träger nicht bestimmbar sind.
Deshalb können wir mit Identität zählen, wenn wir nur die Personen zählen, die zu einer Zeit bestimmbar sind und bekommen die richtige Anwort. Eine Person existiert vor der Spaltung, zwei nachher.
Insgesamt sind es drei, aber dann werden auch die nichtbestimmbaren gezählt! Aber bei der Spaltung verschwindet die erste und zwei neue entstehen.
LewisVsPerry: ich gebe zu, dass Zählung durch Identität zu t etwas kontraintuitiv ist, aber ist es nicht genauso kontraintuitiv, unbestimmbare Personen auszulassen?
"es gibt"/existeren: zeitlos gesehen gibt es Personen, sie existieren aber zu einer Zeit. (d.h. sie haben Zustände, Stadien).
IV 72
Und damit sind sie nicht identisch mit den Personen, die wir zählen. Ist es nicht ungerechtfertigt, sie auszuschließen? Perry kann sagen: wir haben ausgezeichnete praktische Gründe. Methusalem/Perry/Lewis: Perry geht nicht darauf ein, sein Ansatz kann aber darauf angewendet werden:
Das Ganze von Methusalem ist sowohl Lebenszeit als auch Zweig und damit eine unproblematische Peson.
Zweige/Lewis: (= continuants, dauerhafte Personen) die (willkürlich gewählten) Segmente von 137 Jahren. Für Perry wären es die doppelten 274 Jahre.
Lebenszeit: ist bei den trivialen Ausnahmefällen des Beginns und des Endes nicht identisch. D.h. die ersten und die letzten 137 Jahre sind beides: Zweig und Lebenszeit, da sie nicht auseinanderklaffen können.
Jedes Stadium gehört zu genau einer Person, die zu t bestimmbar ist und zu unendlich vielen nichtbestimmbaren Personen!
Zählung nach Identität liefert die richtige Antwort, weil sie die unbestimmbaren auslässt.
RtR und ItR sind für jede Zeit t identisch, aber sie RR und die IR differieren für je zwei Stadien, die weiter als 137 Jahre auseinander liegen. (Aber nicht mehr als 274).
Identität/Perry: er sagt nichts über Grade personaler Identität.
Lewis: er könnte sie aber übernehmen.
LewisVsPerry: pro Perry was die normalen Fälle betrifft, aber bei pathologischen Fällen (Spaltung usw.) fehlt ein genauer Punkt der Referenz:
Das führt wieder zu Überbevölkerung:
Bsp wie viele Personen waren bei einer Spaltung involviert, die sich vor langer Zeit ereignete? Ich sage: zwei Perry: drei. Oder er sagt: keine heute bestimmbaren.
- - -
IV 151
Heimson Bsp/LewisVsPerry: soweit sein Argument und ich glaube, dass es funktioniert, aber es ist zu kompliziert, ohne extra etwas zu leisten. Seine Lösung muss mindestens so gut sein wie meine, weil sie ein Teil meiner Lösung ist. Wann immer ich sage, dass jemand sich die Eigenschaft X zuschreibt, sagt Perry: das erste Objekt ist ein Paar von ihm und der Eigenschaft X. Das zweite Objekt ist dann die Funktion die irgendeinem Subjekt das Paar Y und X zuschreibt.
Der scheinbare Vorteil bei Perry ist, dass er external attribution (e.a.) genauso gut wie self attribution (s.a.) erklärt.
Glauben de re: Zuschreibung von Eigenschaften an Individuen.
Perrys Schema ist gemacht für Zuschreibung de re, aber de se fällt darunter als Spezialfall.
IV 152
De re: Heimson und der Psychiater stimmen darin überein, Heimson die Eigenschaft, Hume zu sein, zuschreiben. LewisVsPerry: meine Lösung ist einfacher: die Selbstzuschreibungen eines Subjekts sind das Ganze seines Glaubenssystems ((s) >Chisholm).
Fremdzuschreibungen: sind keine weiteren Glaubenseinstellungen neben den .
Glauben/Überzeugung/LewisVsPutnam: ist im Kopf! ((s) Putnam spricht auch nur von Bedeutungen, die nicht im Kopf sind.)
Lewis: aber ich stimme mit Perry überein, dass Glauben de re im allgemeinen nicht im Kopf sind, weil sie in Wirklichkeit gar nicht Glauben sind! Sie sind Sachverhalte, Kraft der Relationen des Glaubens des Subjekts zu den Dingen.
LewisVsPerry: sein Schema repräsentiert neben Glauben noch etwas anderes. Für Glauben ist es redundant. Wenn wir ein paar erste Objekte haben und ein paar erforderliche Tatsachen die nicht über Glauben.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989
Plantinga, A. Lewis Vs Plantinga, A.
 
Books on Amazon
Bigelow I 181
Repräsentation/Proposition/Struktur/LewisVsPlantinga: seine (strukturlosen) Propositionen machen Repräsentation zu etwas Magischem. Lösung/PlantingaVsLewis: Repräsentation wird eben als Grundbegriff genommen und ist völlig verständlich und nicht magisch.
Bigelow I 228
Zugänglichkeit/Lewis: ihre Grade sollten als Grade von Ähnlichkeit verstanden werden. Ähnlichkeit/Lewis: hier müssen wir die relevante Ähnlichkeit erkennen. Wichtiger ist die in Bezug auf bestimmte Gesetze! Damit werden Gesetze bei der Erklärung schon vorausgesetzt. (Lewis 1979, 1986a - JacksonVsLewis: Jackson 1977a: Kausalität statt Ähnlichkeit)
I 231
BigelowVsVs/BigelowVsLewis: wir leugnen, daß Zugänglichkeit durch Ähnlichkeit erklärt werden muß. Die am leichtesten zugängliche Welt muß nicht die ähnlichste Welt sein. - - -
Schwarz I 68
Def Mögliche Welt/MöWe/Plantinga: als maximal mögliche Sachverhalte (st.o.a.). („magischer Ersatzismus“)
Schw I 69
st.o.a. als abstrakte Entitäten, über deren Struktur sich nicht viel sagen lässt. Jedenfalls sind sie keine realen Universen oder Konstruktionen aus realen Dingen. Existenz/“Bestehen“/Plantinga: (>“es gibt“): ist eine grundlegende Eigenschaft, die nicht weiter analysiert werden kann. Andere st.o.a. bestehen nicht, könnten aber bestehen.
Def maximal/st.o.a./Plantinga: ein st.o.a. ist maximal, wenn sein Bestehen für jeden anderen st.o.a. entweder dessen Bestehen oder Nicht Bestehen impliziert.
MöWe/Plantinga: sind maximal mögliche st.o.a. Bsp Dass „in“ einer MöWe Esel sprechen können, heißt, dass Esel sprechen könnten, wenn der st.o.a. die Eigenschaft des Bestehens hätte.
VsPlantinga: dieser Zusammenhang zwischen einer primitiven Eigenschaft abstrakter Entitäten und der Existenz sprechender Esel muss als unerklärbar akzeptiert werden. Insbesondere hat er nichts mit der internen Struktur oder Zusammensetzung der abstrakten Entität zu tun: diese enthält weder einen sprechenden Esel noch ein Bild oder Modell eines Esels, noch einen Satz oder ein Zeichen, dass irgendwie sprechende Esel repräsentiert.
LewisVsPlantinga: 1.warum kann diese abstrakte Entität nicht jene primitive Eigenschaft haben, obwohl es keine sprechenden Esel gibt? Woher diese notwendige Beziehung zwischen distinkten Entitäten?
2. Plantingas st.o.a. machen eine Reduktion modaler Wahrheiten auf Wahrheit darüber, was für Dinge mit was für Eigenschaften es gibt, unmöglich. Plantinga setzt in der Charakterisierung von MöWe damit schon Modalität voraus. ((1986e,§3,4)
3. Wir wollen auch nicht nur über MöWe, sondern auch über deren Bewohner reden. Plantinga muss Sherlock Holmes als irreduzible abstrakte Wesenheit annehmen. (Plantinga 1976,262 272). Dies ist eine nicht qualitative (haecceitistische) Eigenschaft, die notwenig genau dann von einen Gegenstand x instantiiert wird, wenn x Holmes ist. Wenn wir im modalen Realismus also unzählige bloß mögliche Dinge haben, dann haben wir bei Plantinga unzählige Wesenheiten bloß möglicher Dinge.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Possibilia Lewis Vs Possibilia
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 87
Possibilia/MöWe/mögliche Welten/possibilistischer Strukturalismus/Lewis/Schwarz: (1991,1993d) hier ging Lewis davon aus, These: dass es deutlich weniger Bewohner von MöWe (Possibilia) gibt als Mengen. ML: für sie mussten also zusätzliche Entitäten neben den Possibilia angenommen werden. Diese zusätzlichen Entitäten sollten dann gerade die Mengen (und Klassen), wie die 5. Bedingung (s.o.) verlangt.
Lewis später: akzeptiert, dass es mindestens so viele Possibilia wie Mengen (s.o. Abschnitt 3.2). Dann könnte man auf die zusätzlichen mathematischen Entitäten verzichten (Lewis pro). Dann streichen wir die 5. Bedingung. Dann müssen „viele“ Bewohner von MöWe Mengen sein.
Schw I 88
Denn Lewis setzt voraus, dass es mehr Mengen als Individuen gibt. Denn wenn es „viele“ Individuen gibt, dann auch „viele“ individuelle Atome, Atome von Individuen. Es gibt aber mehr Summen individueller Atome als individuelle Atome. Dann gibt es auch mehr Individuen als Atome überhaupt und dann nach Bedingung (1) und (3) auch mehr Einermengen als Atome, im Widerspruch zu (2). Possibilia/Lewis/Schwarz: wenn sie keine Kardinalität haben, können nicht alle Possibilia Individuen sein.
Def possibilistischer Strukturalismus/Lewis/Schwarz: mathematische Aussagen handeln ohnehin nicht nur von mathematischen Entitäten, sondern teilweise auch von Possibilia. Warum dann nicht nur von diesen?
Pro: er kommt nicht nur ganz ohne primitives mathematisches Vokabular, sondern auch ohne primitive mathematische Ontologie aus. Damit erledigen sich Fragen nach deren Herkunft und unserem epistemischen Zugang. Handeln mathematische Aussagen von Possibilia, ergibt sich ihr
modaler Status aus der Logik unbeschränkter Modalität: Für unbeschränkt
modale Aussagen fallen Wahrheit, Möglichkeit und Notwendigkeit zusammen
(s.o. Abschnitt 3.6).
Lewis: kann aber die mathematische Entitäten nicht einfach streichen. (LewisVsField): Problem: gemischte Summen. Bsp wenn einige Atome in Cäsars Gehirn als Einermengen und andere als Individuen eingestuft werden, dann ist Cäsar eine gemischte Summe.
Gemischte Summe/Mereologie/Lewis: ist aber selbst weder Individuum noch Klasse.
Klasse: Summe von Einermengen.
Schw I 89
gemischte Summen: sind in Lewis’ Originalsystem auch keine Elemente von Mengen. Schwarz: das ist mengentheoretisch unmotiviert: nach der iterativen Auffassung hat absolut alles eine Einermenge. Lewis ignoriert gemischte Summen sowieso meist.
Problem: nicht unter jeder Einermengenbeziehung gibt es eine Einermenge von Cäsar.
Lösung: a) auch gemischten Summe eine Einermenge zugestehe. Vs: es gibt mehr gemischte Summen als Einermengen, das funktioniert also nicht.
b) Forderung: dass alle „kleinen“ gemischten Summen eine Einermenge haben.
c) eleganter: gemischte Summe dadurch erledigen, dass man Individuen verbietet. Wenn man Klassen mit gewöhnlichen Possibilia identifiziert, könnte man jedes Atom als Einermenge behandeln. Bsp Cäsar ist dann immer eine Klasse, seine Einermenge Gegenstand der reinen Mengenlehre.
LewisVs: das funktioniert in seiner ML (anders als bei ZFC) nicht. Denn wir brauchen mindestens ein Individuum als leere Menge.
Einermenge/Lewis/Schwarz: da ein einziges individuelles Atom dazu aber ausreicht, könnte man an Stelle von (1) (3) Einermengenbeziehungen auch als beliebige eineindeutige Abbildungen von kleinen Dingen in alle Atome außer einem bestimmen. Dieses eine Atom ist dann die leere Menge relativ zur jeweiligen Einermengen Beziehung. (> QuineVsRussell: mehrere leere Mengen, dort je nach Typ).
Lösung/Daniel Nolan: (2001, Kaß 7, 2004): VsLewis, VsZermelo: leere Menge als echter Teil von Einermengen:
Def „Esingleton“ von A /Nolan: {A} besteht aus 0 und einem Ding {A} – 0 . (Terminologie: „Singleton“: einzige Karte einer Farbe).
Esingleton/Nolan: für sie gelten ähnliche Annahmen wie bei Lewis für Einermengen.
Gemischte Summe/Nolan: dieses Problem wird zu dem von Summen aus 0 und Atomen, die keine Esingletons sind. Diese sind bei Nolan nie Elemente von Mengen.
Gegenstand/Nolan: (2004.§4):nur gewisse „große“ Dinge kommen als 0 in Frage. Also werden alle „kleinen“ Dinge als Elemente von Klassen erlaubt.
Individuum/Nolan: viele „kleine“ Dinge sind bei ihm unter allen Esingleton Beziehungen Individuen.
Leere Menge/Schwarz: alle diese Ansätze sind nicht makellos. Die Behandlung der leeren Menge ist immer etwas künstlich.
Schw I 90
leere Menge/Lewis/Schwarz: Menge aller Individuen (s.o.): Das hat einen guten Grund! ((s) Also gibt es keine Individuen und die leere Menge wird gebraucht, um das auszudrücken.). Teilmenge/Lewis/Schwarz: ist dann disjunktiv definiert: einmal für Klassen und einmal für die leere Menge.
possibilistischer Strukturalismus/Schwarz: ist elegant. Vs: er verhindert mengentheoretische Konstruktionen von MöWe (etwa als Satzmengen).
Wenn man Wahrheiten über Mengen auf solche über Possibilia reduziert, kann man Possibilia nicht mehr auf Mengen reduzieren.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Possible Worlds Verschiedene Vs Possible Worlds Schwarz I 41
Def Possible World/poss.w./Lewis: früh: Weisen, wie die Dinge sein könnten. Van InwagenVs: das sind eher Eigenschaften als konkrete Universen. (StalnakerVsLewis, RichardsVsLewis: dito). Lewis: später: poss.w. entsprechen Weisen, wie die Dinge sein könnten.
Schwarz: aber wir müssen nicht unbedingt spezielle Entitäten dafür einführen. Sie könnten auch grammatische Illusionen sein. Selbst die Betrachtung von poss.w. als Entitäten legt noch lange nicht fest, was das für Entitäten sind. Z.B.:
Def Possible World/Stalnaker/Schwarz: die Bestimmung als (maximale) Weisen, wie die Dinge sein könnten: dann sind es spezielle Eigenschaften oder Propositionen. (Stalnaker 1976, Robert Adams, 1974).
Def Possible World/Plantinga: (1974, Kap. 4) maximale Sachverhalte. Danach muss man unterscheiden zwischen Existenz und Bestehen eines Sachverhalts (SV). Bsp Der SV, dass Esel sprechen könnten existiert, aber er besteht nicht. (Existenz: Möglichkeit – Bestehen: Wirklichkeit? – eher Realität (als weiterer Begriff): beinhaltet Möglichkeiten).
Schw I 42
Def Possible World/Entscheidungstheorie/Richard Jeffrey: (1965,196f): maximal konsistente Satzmengen. Da der Satz Bsp "Esel können sprechen" konsistent ist, gibt es eine maximal konsistente Satzmenge, die ihn enthält. Das drücken wir aus, wenn wir sagen, es gibt eine poss.w.... Def Surrogat- four dimensionalism/Schwarz. diese Positionen entsprechen dem Sachverhalt in der Philosophie der Zeit (s.o. 22), die andere Zeiten als abstrakte Entitäten auffasst, die von anderer Art sind als die Gegenwart.
LewisVs: andere Zeiten sind genauso real.
Def Koexistenz/Lewis: zwei Dinge befinden sich in derselben Welt, iff es einen raumzeitlichen Weg von einem zum anderen gibt. Konsequenz:
poss.w./Lewis: sind raumzeitlich isoliert! Es gibt also auch keine Kausalität zwischen ihnen. Kein Ereignis in einer poss.w. verursacht ein anderes in einer anderen poss.w.
D.h. weiter, dass poss.w. eben nicht von uns geschaffen wurden! Wir können sie auch nicht von hier aus sehen, messen oder besuchen. (1986e,3,80f). Lewis ist es egal, ob man seine poss.w. konkret nennt oder abstrakt. Das hat keine klaren Sinn (1986e,§1,7).
Wirkliche Welt/WiWe/Lewis: was unterschiedet sie von den anderen poss.w.? Nicht ihre Konkretheit, sondern die Tatsache, dass wir in ihr leben. Objektiv ist die WiWe genauso wenig ausgezeichnet wir jede andere, oder wie die Gegenwart.
"actual"/Lewis: ist ein indexikalischer Ausdruck wie "hier" oder "jetzt". Daher können wir nicht sinnvoll fragen, ob wie in der wirklichen Welt leben oder in einer möglichen. Genauso können wir nicht fragen, ob wir in der Gegenwart leben oder vielleicht in der Zukunft.
Wirklichkeit/Lewis/Schwarz: Lewis Analyse von "wirklich" wird auch von Gegner des modal Realism geteilt:
Van InwagenVsModal Realism/InwagenVsLewis: "Conkretism". Stalnaker: "extreme modal Realism".
- - -
Lewis IV 85
Bedeutung/Referenz/theoretische Termini/TT/Lewis: wenn wir damit die Denotation der TT haben, wie steht es mit ihrem Sinn? Aber den haben wir schon! Denn wir haben ihre Denotation in jeder möglichen Welt (MöWe) spezifiziert. Def Sinn/Lewis: Denotation eines Ausdrucks in jeder poss.w..
D.h. in jeder MöWe müssen die TT die Komponenten dessen benennen, was immer die Theorie T in dieser Welt einmalig realisiert. Wenn es in der Welt keine Realisierung gibt, benennen sie auch nichts.
Def Sinn/Lewis: daher können wir sagen, der Sinn sei eine Funktion (aller oder einiger) poss.w. auf benannte Entitäten.
VsPossible Worlds/VsMöWe/Lewis: manche nennen sie okkult,
VsVs: aber sie sind nicht okkulter als z.B. unendliche Mengen, die wir sehr gut handhaben können.





Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Possible Worlds Stalnaker Vs Possible Worlds
 
Books on Amazon
I 49
Possible world/poss.w./knowledge/mathematics/StalnakerVsLewis/Stalnaker: I am inclined to say that the poss.w.-theory makes assumptions about the nature of their properties that are - unlike the corresponding assumptions of mathematical platonism - incompatible with the representation of the connection between the knowledge subjects and their objects in the case of poss.w.. poss.w./MR/VsModal realism/knowledge/verificationism/StalnakerVsLewis: the modal realist cannot cite any verificationist principles for what he calls his knowledge.
Conclusion: problem: the MR cannot on the one hand say that poss.w. things are of the same kind as the actual world (contingent physical objects) and say on the other hand that poss.w. are things of which we know by the same kind like of numbers, sets, functions. ((s) Namely no real existing things.).
I 53
StalnakerVsLewis: he contradicts himself because his other thesis about poss.w. about which we can have substantial beliefs contradicts his definition of content (see above).
I 58
Contradiction/Lewis: there is no object howsoever fantastic about which one could tell the truth by contradicting oneself. Footnote:
Takashi YagisawaVsLewis: why not? What should you expect otherwise? Impossible things are impossible.
- - -
II 20
Belief ascription/solution/Stalnaker: I always wonder how the poss.w. would be according to what the believer believes. E.g. Pierre: for him there are two cities (Londres and London)
E.g. Lingens in the library: for him there are two men, one named "Lingens" about which the other reads something.
Relations theory/RelTh/Stalnaker: this can reconcile with the assumption that propositions are the belief objects. (Team: Stalnaker pro Relations theory? (1999))
Index/belief/Stalnaker: nevertheless I believe that convictions have an irreducible indexical element.
Solution/Lewis: sets of centered poss.w. as belief objects.
StalnakerVsLewis: although I have accepted that such poss.w. then include a representation of the mental state of the believer.
But that is not what it is about! It is not sufficient that poss.w. that are compatible with one's convictions then include a person who has these convictions (> e.g. Lingens), the believer must identify himself with the person who has this thought!
Proposition/identification/self-identification/Stalnaker: I am not suggesting that this identification is fulfilled by the belief in a proposition.
I now think that this is not at all about some kind of cognitive performance.
Indexical conviction/Stalnaker: (E.g. Perry: memory loss, library, e.g. Lewis: 2 gods (2 omniscient gods, e.g. Castaneda: memory loss): indexical unknowing.
Stalnaker: thesis: people do not differ in what they believe.
II 21
E.g. O'Leary knows that he is in the basement and that Daniels is in the kitchen. And Daniels knows the same thing: that he is in the kitchen and O'Leary in the basement. Everyone knows who and where he is and who and where the other is. The poss.w. that are compatible with the convictions of the two are the same. They argue about nothing.
Yet there is an obvious difference in their doxastic situation: O'Leary identifies himself with the one in the basement and Daniels identifies himself as one who is in the kitchen.
poss.w. semantics/StalnakerVsPossible worlds semantics/Stalnaker: this difference in the belief states of the two is not reflected by a set of poss.w. as belief state.
Solution/Lewis: self-ascription of properties, or - equivalently - sets of centered poss.w..
StalnakerVsLewis: I do not want that.
StalnakerVsLewis: problem: it is wrong to treat the difference in perspective as a dispute (disagreement). The two argue about nothing.
Problem: it is not sure if one can express their agreement with the fact that the set of their uncentered poss.w. is the same. Because
E.g. Heimson/Perry/Stalnaker: (Heimson believes "I am David Hume") all his impersonal beliefs about Hume are correct. Suppose they are the same convictions as the convictions of Hume about Hume.
Stalnaker: nevertheless it would be wrong to say that they argue about nothing. ((s) unlike O'Leary and Daniels).
- - -
II 134
Localization/space/time/self-localization/logical space/Lewis/Stalnaker: logical space/Lewis/Stalnaker: set of poss.w. from which one selects one.
Self-localization/physical: in space and time. We usually know where we are. ((s) but we never know all poss.w. in which we could be localized, we cannot distinguish all poss.w. because we do not know everything).
Gods example/Stalnaker: the two know exactly where they are in the logical space.
II 135
But they do not know where within this poss.w. they are. LewisVsTradition: the doctrine of the proposition is focused only on one of the two types of localized belief.
Generalization: is what we need and for that the transition from propositions to properties (as belief objects) serves.
- - -
II 144
Gods example/Stalnaker: this is also a case of unknowing, which of two indistinguishable poss.w. is actual. One is actually the actual world while the other exactly the sam, with the exception that the god who sits in the actual world on the highest mountain is this time sitting on the coldest mountain and in fact with all the properties that the god on the highest mountain actually has.
((s) two individuals change places but keep all the properties. This is only possible if localization is not a property)
Omniscience/Stalnaker: then you have to say, the two gods are not really omniscient regarding propositions, but rather omniscient in relation to purely qualitative criteria.
LewisVsStalnaker: Lewis rejects this explanation for two reasons:
1. because he represents the counterpart theory (c.th.) that makes the cross world identity superfluous or meaningless.
2. even without counterpart it would not work because
Assuming that the two gods of world W have traded places in world V assuming the god on the highest knows that his world is W, not V. Assuming he is omniscient with respect to all propositions not only the qualitative propositions.
II 145
V: the world V cannot be relevant because he knows that he does not live there. Problem: there are still two mountains in a poss.w. W where he after all what he knows can live.
StalnakerVsLewis: that does not answer the question: you cannot simply stipulate that the God in W knows something and not V. Because after the explanation we proposed that leads to the fact that he knows on which mountain he lives.
Lewis/Stalnaker: his explanation is plausible if one conceives it as a metaphor for a location in the logical space:
logical space/Lewis/Stalnaker: assume that a map of the logical space divided into large regions match the poss.w. and in smaller subdivisions represent the locations within poss.w..
Important argument: then we can tell someone in which large region he is without telling him exactly where he is located in it.
Modal Realism/MR/logical space/Stalnaker: for him this image might be appropriate.
Actualism/logical space/localization/Stalnaker: for the actualism this image is misleading: to know in which country you are is different to know where in the country you are but it is not so clear that there is a difference between the fact that one knows anything about in which poss.w. one is and knowing which poss.w. is the actual.
Lewis also admits this.
Stalnaker: my approach seems to be really close to the one of Lewis, but no.
Centered poss.w.: one should perhaps instead of indistinguishable poss.w. speak of centered worlds (after Quine). These are then distinguishable.
Indistinguishability/poss.w./Stalnaker: distinct but indistinguishable poss.w. would then be the same worlds but with different centers.
Attitude/properties/propositions/centered world/Lewis: to treat objects of attitudes as sets of centered poss.w. makes them to properties instead of propositions.
Centered poss.w./Stalnaker: I agree that possible situations normally, perhaps even essential, are centered in the sense of a representation of a particular mental state.
II 146
StalnakerVsLewis: but this makes the approach (gods example) more complicated when it comes to the relations between different mental states. E.g. to compare past with current states is then more difficult, or relations between the convictions of different people.
Information/communication/Stalnaker: we need then additional explanation about how information is exchanged. Two examples:
E.g. O'Leary is freed from his trunk and wonders at around nine:
a) "What time was it when I wondered what time it was?"
Stalnaker: that is the same question like the one he asked then.
When he learns that it was three o'clock, his doubt has been eliminated.
Solution: the doubt is eliminated since all possible situations (poss.w.) in which a thought occurs at two different times are involved. The centers of these situations have moved in the sense that it is now nine o'clock and O'Leary no longer in the trunk but it may be that the first occurrence of the then thought is what O'Leary is now thinking about.
Important argument: this moving of the center does not require that the poss.w. that the propositions characterize are changed.
b) "What time was it when I wondered if it was three or four?". (If he wondered twice)
Indistinguishability: even if the two incidents were indistinguishable for O'Leary, it may still be that it was the first time which O'Leary remembers at around nine o'clock.
StalnakerVsLewis: his approach is more complicated. According to his approach we have to say at three o'clock, O'Leary wonders about his current temporal localization in the actual world (act.wrld.) instead of wondering in what poss.w. he is.
Versus: at nine, things are quite different: now he wonders if he lives in a poss.w. in which a particular thought occurred at three or four. This is unnecessarily complicated.
E.g. Lingens, still in the library, meets Ortcutt and asks him "Do you know who I am?" – "You are my cousin, Rudolf Lingens!".
Stalnaker: that seems to be a simple and successful communication. Information was requested and given. The question was answered.
II 147
Proposition/Stalnaker: (Propositions as belief objects) Ortcutt's answer expresses a proposition that distinguishes between possible situations and eliminates Lingen's doubt. StalnakerVsLewis: according to his approach (self-ascription of properties), it is again more complicated:
Lingens: asks if he correctly ascribes himself a certain set of properties i.
Ortcutt: answers by ascribing himself a completely different set of properties.
Lingens: has to conclude then subsequently himself the answer. So all the answers are always indirect in communication. ((s) also StalnakerVsChisholm, implicit).
Communication/Lewis/Chisholm/StalnakerVsLewis/StalnakerVsChsholm: everyone then always speaks only about himself.
Solution/Stalnaker: Lewis would otherwise have to distinguish between attitudes and speech acts and say that speech acts have propositions as object and attitudes properties as an object.
Problem/StalnakerVsLewis: Lewis cannot say by intuition that the content of Ortcutt's answer is the information that eliminates Lingen's doubt.
That is also a problem for Perry's approach. (> StalnakerVsPerry)

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003
Reductionism Physicalism Vs Reductionism
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 156
Physikalismus/Vs Reduktionismus/VsLewis. andere Autoren: der Physikalismus ist gar nicht auf die a priori Ableitbarkeit der mentalen aus den physikalischen Wahrheiten festgelegt, nur auf Supervenienz mentaler auf physikalischen Tatsachen. Das muss aber nicht a priori sein. Es kann A posteriori Notwendigkeit sein. Wie Bsp die Beziehung zwischen H2O Wahrheiten und Wasser Wahrheiten. (Das ist der nicht reduktive Physikalismus). LewisVs: das ist ein Missverständnis über A Posteriori Notwendigkeit: Bsp Angenommen, „Wasser ist H2O“ ist a posteriori notwendig.: dann liegt das nicht daran, dass hier eine modale Tatsache besteht, eine Notwendigkeit, die wir nur a posteriori entdecken können, sondern vielmehr daran, dass die Bedeutung gewisser Wörter von kontingenten, empirischen Faktoren abhängt: nach unseren Konventionen greift „Wasser“ in allen möglichen Welten denjenigen Stoff heraus, der bei uns Seen und Bäche füllt. „Wasser ist H2O“ ist a posteriori, weil man erst einmal herausfinden muss, dass der Stoff, der bei uns Bäche und Seen füllt, H2O ist. Das ist eine kontingente Tatsache die gewöhnlich chemische Untersuchung erfordert, keine Ausflüge in den modalen Raum. Die H2O Wahrheiten implizieren deshalb a priori die Wasser Wahrheiten.
Wenn Schmerz a posteriori identisch ist mit einem physikalischen Zustand, dann muss auch das daran liegen, dass der Bezug von „Schmerz“ von kontingenten Tatsachen abhängt, davon, was für ein Zustand bei uns die und die Rolle spielt ((s) nicht, was für eine Sprachkonvention wir haben). (vgl. 1994b,296f).

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Semantic Value Verschiedene Vs Semantic Value Schwarz I 198
Def semantischer Wert/Lewis/Schwarz: im nächsten Schritt werden semantische Werte zugeteilt: aus diesen sollen am Ende die Wahrheitsbedingungen (WB) von Sätzen (Funktionen von möglichen Situationen auf Wahrheitswerte) hervorgehen.
Schw I 199
Kategorie N: diesen Ausdrücken wird in der intensionalen Semantik eine Funktion von möglichen Situationen auf Dinge zugewiesen. Die Werte für andere Kategorien ergeben sich dann wieder aus ihrer syntaktischen Rolle: Bsp da „lacht“ ein Ausdruck der Kategorie (S/N) ist, muss sein semantischer Wert zusammen mit dem Wert eines N -Ausdrucks den Wert eines S-Ausdrucks liefern.
Bsp der semantische Wert von „lacht“ ist also eine Funktion von N-Werten (Funktionen von möglichen Situationen auf Individuen) auf S Werte (Funktionen von möglichen Situationen auf WW).
Bsp das Adverb „laut“ hat als semantischen Wert eine Funktion von (S/N)-Werten auf (S/N)-Werte (Also eine Funktion von Funktionen von Funktionen von Situationen auf Individuen auf Funktionen von Situationen auf Wahrheitswerten (WW) auf Funktionen von Funktionen von Situationen auf Individuen auf Funktionen von Situationen auf WW).
Bedeutung/Vs semantischer Wert/VsLewis: Frage: ist die Bedeutung von „Frieda“ wirklich eine Funktion von Situationen auf Individuen, und nicht einfach Frieda selbst?
Lewis/Schwarz: solche Bedenken halten ihn nicht auf: um zu sagen, was Bedeutung ist, müssen wir zuerst fragen, was Bedeutung tut und dann das finden, das das macht. (1970b,193).





Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Stalnaker, R. Field Vs Stalnaker, R.
 
Books on Amazon
II 35
Proposition/Mathematics/Stalnaker: (1976, p 88): There are only two mathematical propositions, the necessarily true one and the necessarily false one. And we know that the first one is true and the second one is false. Problem: The functions that determine which of the two ((s) E.g. "This sentence is true", "this sentence is false"?) is expressed by a mathematical statement are just sufficiently complex to doubt which of the two is being expressed.
Solution/Stalnaker: therefore the belief objects in mathematics should be considered as propositions about the relation between sentences and what they say.
FieldVsStalnaker: it does not work. E.g. "the Banach-Tarski conditional" stands for the conditional whose antecedent is the conjunction of the set theory with the axiom of choice (AoC) and whose consequent is the Banach-Tarski theorem (BTT).
Suppose a person doubts the BTT, but knows the rule of language which refers sentences of the language of the ML to propositions.
By Stalnaker, this person would not really doubt the proposition expressed by the BT conditional, because it is a logical truth.
Field: what he really doubts is the proposition that is expressed by the following:
(i) the language rules connect the BT conditional with necessary truth.
Problem: because the person is familiar with the language rules for the language of the ML, he can only doubt (i) even if he also doubted the proposition expressed by the following:
(ii) the language rules __ refer the BT conditional to the necessary truth.
wherein the voids must be filled with the language rules of the language.
Important argument: FieldVsStalnaker: the proposition expressed by (ii) is a necessary truth itself!
And because Stalnaker supposes coarse sets of possible worlds, he cannot distinguish by this if anyone believes them or not. ((s) because it makes no difference in the sets of possible worlds, because necessary truth is true in every possible world).
FieldVsStalnaker: the rise of mathematical propositions to metalinguistic ones has lead to nothing.
Proposition/FieldVsStalnaker: must be individuated more finely than amounts of possible worlds and Lewis shows us how: if we accept that the believing of a proposition involves an attitude towards sentences.
E.g. Believing ML is roughly the same thing as believing* the conjunction of its axioms.
The believed* sentences have several fine-grained meanings. Therefore (1) attributes different fine-grained propositions to the two different persons.
II 45
Representation/Functionalism/Field: 1) Question: Does an adequate belief theory need to have assumptions about representations incorporated explicitly?. Functionalism/Field: does not offer an alternative to representations here. By that I mean more than the fact that functionalism is compatible with representations. Lewis and Stalnaker would admit that.
Representation/Lewis/Stalnaker/Field: both would certainly admit that assuming one opened the head of a being and found a blackboard there on which several English sentence were written, and if, furthermore, one saw that this influenced the behavior in the right way, then we would have a strong assumption for representations.
This shows that functionalism is compatible with representations.
Representation/FieldVsStalnaker/FieldVsLewis: I’m hinting at something stronger that both would certainly reject: I think the two would say that without opening the head we have little reason to believe in representations.
II 46
It would be unfounded neurophysiological speculation. S-Proposition/Stalnaker: 2 Advantages:
1) as a coarse-grained one it fits better into the pragmatic approach of intentional states (because of their ((s) more generous) identity conditions for contents).
2) this is the only way we can solve Brentano’s problem of the naturalistic explanation of mind states.
II 82
Belief/Stalnaker: Relation between the cognitive state of an acting person and S-propositions.
II 83
FieldVsStalnaker. Vs 1) and 2) 1) The whole idea of ​​E.g. "the object of", "the contents of" should be treated with caution. In a very general sense they are useful to determine the equality of such contents. But this is highly context-dependent.
II 84
2) Stalnaker does not only want to attribute entities to mind states as their content, but even. Def intrinsically representational entities/iR/Field: in them, it is already incorporated that they represent the real universe in a certain way.
3) Even if we attribute such intrinsically representational entities as content, it is not obvious that there could be only one type of such iR.
Fine-grained/Coarse/FieldVsStalnaker: for him, there seems to be a clear separation; I believe it is not so clear.
Therefore, it is also not clear for me whether his S-propositions are the right content, but I do not want to call them the "wrong" content, either.
Field: Thesis: We will also need other types of "content-like" properties of mind states, both for the explanation of behavior and for the naturalistic access to content.
Intentionality/Mind State/Stalnaker/Field: Stalnaker represents what he calls the pragmatic image and believes that it leads to the following:
1) the belief objects are coarse.
Def Coarse/Stalnaker: are belief objects that cannot be logically different and at the same equivalent.
2) StalnakerVsMentalese/StalnakerVsLanguage of Thought.
Mentalese/Language of Thought/Stalnaker/Field: apparently, Stalnaker believes that a thought language (which is more finely grained) would have to lead to a rejection of the pragmatic image.
FieldVsStalnaker: this is misleading.
Def Pragmatic Image/Intentionality/Stalnaker/Field: Stalnaker Thesis: representational mind states should be understood primarily in terms of the role they play in the characterization of actions.
II 85
StalnakerVsLinguistic Image: Thesis: Speaking is only one type of action. It has no special status.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980
Stalnaker, R. Lewis Vs Stalnaker, R.
 
Books on Amazon
Read III 101/102
Stalnaker setzt die Wahrscheinlichkeit der Bedingungssätze mit der bedingten Wahrscheinlichkeit gleich. LewisVsStalnaker: es gibt keine Aussage, deren Wahrscheinlichkeit durch die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit gemessen wird! (+ III 102)
Nach Lewis ergibt sich, dass auf Grund von Stalnakers Annahme die Wahrscheinlichkeiten beim Kartenziehen unabhängig sind. Das ist aber offensichtlich falsch (im Gegensatz zum Würfeln). Also kann die Wahrscheinlichkeit des Bedingungssatzes nicht durch die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit gemessen werden.
III 108
Bsp von Lewis Wenn Bizet und Verdi Landsleute wären, wäre Bizet Italiener
und
Wenn Bizet und Verdi Landsleute wären, wäre Bizet nicht Italiener.
Stalnaker: die eine oder die andere muß wahr sein.
Lewis: beide sind falsch. (Weil nur konjunktivische Bedingungssätze nicht wahrheitsfunktional sind). Die indikativischen Stücke wären im Munde derjenigen, denen ihre Nationalität unbekannt ist, ganz akzeptabel.
- - -
Lewis IV 149
Handlung/Rationalität/Stalnaker: Propositionen sind hier die geeigneten Objekte von Einstellungen. LewisVsStalnaker: es stellt sich heraus, dass er eigentlich eine Theorie der Einstellungen de se braucht.
Stalnaker: der rational Handelnde ist jemand, der verschiedene mögliche rationale Zukünfte annimmt. Die Funktion des Wunschs ist einfach, diese verschiedenen Ereignisverläufe in die gewünschten und die abgelehnten zu unterteilen.
Oder eine Ordnung oder ein Maß für alternative Möglichkeiten zu liefern in bezug auf Wünschbarkeit.
Glauben/Stalnaker: seine Funktion ist es einfach, zu bestimmen, welchen die relevanten alternativen Situationen sein können, oder sie in Bezug auf ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit unter verschiedenen Bedingungen zu ordnen.
Einstellungsobjekte/Glaubensobjekte/Stalnaker: sind identisch dann und nur dann, wenn sie funktional äquivalent sind, und das sind sie nur dann, wenn sie sich in keiner alternativ möglichen Situation unterscheiden.
Lewis: wenn diese alternativen Situationen immer alternative MöWe sind, wie Stalnaker annimmt, dann ist das in der Tat ein Argument für Propositionen. ((s) Unterscheidung Situation/MöWe).
Situation/MöWe/Möglichkeit/LewisVsStalnaker: ich denke, es kann auch innerhalb einer einzelnen MöWe Alternativen geben!
Bsp Lingens weiß mittlerweile fast genug, um sich selbst zu identifizieren. Er hat seine Möglichkeiten auf zwei reduziert: a) er ist im 6. Stock der Stanford Bücherei, dann muss er treppab gehen oder
b) er ist im Untergeschoss der Bücherei des Widener College und muss treppauf gehen.
Die Bücher sagen ihm, dass es genau einen Menschen mit Gedächtnisverlust an jedem dieser Orte gibt. Und er hat herausgefunden, dass er einer der beiden sein muss. Seine Überlegung liefert 8 Möglichkeiten:
Die acht Fälle verteilen sich nur über vier Arten von Welten! Z.B. 1 und 3 gehören nicht zu verschiedenen Welten sondern sind 3000 Meilen entfernt in derselben Welt.
Um diese zu unterscheiden braucht man wieder Eigenschaften, ((s) Die Propositionen gelten für beide Gedächtniskünstler gleichermaßen.)
- - -
V 145
Konditionale/Wahrscheinlichkeit/Stalnaker: (1968) Schreibweise: "›" (spitz, nicht horseshoe!) Def Stalnaker Konditional: ein Konditional A › C ist wahr gdw. die geringstmögliche Änderung, die A wahr macht, auch C wahr macht. (Revision).
Stalnaker: vermutet, dass damit P(A › C) und P(C I A) angeglichen werden, wenn A positiv ist.
Die Sätze, die wie auch immer unter Stalnaker Bedingungen wahr sind, sind dann genau die, die positive Wschk haben unter seiner Hypothese über Wschk von Konditionalen.
LewisVsStalnaker: das gilt wohl meistens, aber nicht in gewissen modalen Kontexten, wo verschiedene Interpretationen einer Sprache die gleichen Sätze verschieden bewerten.
V 148
Konditional/Stalnaker: um zu entscheiden, ob man ein Konditional glauben soll: 1. füge das Antezedens zur Menge deiner Glaubenseinstellungen hinzu,
2. mache die nötigen Korrekturen für die Konsistenz
3. entscheide, ob das Konsequens wahr ist.
Lewis: das ist richtig für ein Stalnaker-Konditional, wenn die vorgetäuschte Revision durch Abbildung erfolgt.
V 148/149
LewisVsStalnaker: die Passage suggeriert, dass man die Art Revision vortäuschen soll, die stattfindet, wenn das Antezedens wirklich zu den Glaubenseinstellungen hinzugefügt würde. Aber das ist falsch: dann brauchte man Konditionalisierung. - - -
Schwarz I 60
Gegenstück/c.p./Gegenstücktheorie/c.p.th./Gegenstückrelation/c.p.r./StalnakerVsLewis: wenn man ohnehin fast beliebige Relationen als c.p.r. zulässt, könnte man auch nicht qualitativen Beziehungen verwenden. (Stalnaker 1987a): dann kann man c.p. mit dem Haecceitismus versöhnen: wenn man sich daran stößt, dass bei Lewis (x)(y)(x = y > N(x = y) falsch ist, (Lewis pro kontingente Identität, s.o.) kann man auch festlegen, dass ein Ding stets nur ein c.p. pro Welt hat. Stalnaker/Schwarz: das geht nicht mit qualitativen c.p.r., da immer denkbar ist, dass mehrere Dinge – Bsp in einer völlig symmetrischen Welt – einem dritten Ding in einer anderen MöWe genau gleich ähnlich sind.
LewisVsStalnaker: Vsnicht qualitative c.p.r.: alle Wahrheiten einschließlich modaler Wahrheiten sollen darauf beruhen, was für Dinge es gibt, (in der wirklichen Welt und möglichen Welten) und welche (qualitativen) Eigenschaften sie haben (>“Mosaik“).
- - -
Schwarz I 62
Mathematik/Wahrmachen/Tatsache/Lewis/Schwarz: wie bei MöWe gibt es keine eigentliche Information: Bsp dass 34 die Wurzel von 1156 ist, sagt uns nichts über die Welt. ((s) Dass es in jeder MöWe gilt. Regeln sind keine Wahrmacher). Schwarz: Bsp dass es niemand gibt, der die rasiert, die sich nicht selbst rasieren, ist analog keine Information über die Welt. ((s) Also nicht, dass die Welt qualitativ so aufgebaut ist).
Schwarz: vielleicht lernen wir hier eher etwas über Sätze. Es ist aber eine kontingente Wahrheit (!) , dass Sätze wie Bsp „es gibt jemand, der die rasiert, die sich nicht selbst rasieren“ inkonsistent ist.
Lösung/Schwarz: der Satz hätte etwas anderes bedeuten und damit konsistent sein können.
Schw I 63
scheinbar analytische Wahrheit/Lewis/Schwarz: Bsp was erfahren wir wenn wir erfahren, dass Ophtalmologen Augenärzte sind? Dass Augenärzte Augenärzte sind, wussten wir schon vorher. Wir haben eine kontingente semantische Tatsache erfahren. Modallogik/Modalität/modales Wissen/Stalnaker/Schwarz: These: modales Wissen könnte immer als semantisches Wissen verstanden werden. Bsp wenn wir fragen, ob Katzen notwendig Tiere sind, fragen wir, wie die Ausdrücke „Katze“ und „Tier“ zu gebrauchen sind. (Stalnaker 1991,1996, Lewis 1986e:36).
Wissen/SchwarzVsStalnaker: das reicht nicht: um kontingente Information zu erwerben, muss man immer die Welt untersuchen. (kontingent/Schwarz: empirisches, nicht semantisches Wissen).
Modale Wahrheit/Schwarz: der Witz an logischen, mathematischen und Modalen Wahrheiten ist gerade, dass sie ohne Kontakt mit der Welt gewusst werden können. Hier erwerben wir keine Information. ((s) >wahr machen: keine empirische Tatsache „in der Welt“ macht, dass 2+2 = 4 ist).
- - -
Schwarz I 207
„sekundäre Wahrheitsbedingungen“/truth conditions/tr.cond./semantischer Wert/WB/Lewis/Schwarz: zur Verwirrung trägt bei, dass die einfachen (s.o., kontextabhängige, ((s) „indexikalische) und variablen Funktionen von Welten auf Wahrheitswerte (WW) oft nicht nur als „semantische Werte“ sondern auch als WB bezeichnet werden. Wichtig: diese Wahrheitsbedingungen (tr.cond.) müssen von den normalen WB unterschieden werden.
Lewis: verwendet WB mal so mal so. 1986e,42 48: für primäre, 1969, Kap V: für sekundäre).
Def primäre WB/Schwarz: die Bedingungen, unter denen der Satz gemäß den Konventionen der jeweiligen Sprachgemeinschaft geäußert werden sollte.
WB/Lewis/Schwarz: sind das Bindeglied zwischen Sprachgebrauch und formaler Semantik ihre Bestimmung ist der Zweck der Grammatik.
Anmerkung:
Def Diagonalisierung/Stalnaker/Lewis/Schwarz: die primären tr.cond. erhält man durch Diagonalisierung, d.h. indem man als Welt Parameter die Welt der jeweiligen Situation einsetzt (entsprechend als Zeit Parameter den Zeitpunkt der Situation usw.).
Def „diagonale Proposition“/Terminologie/Lewis: (nach Stalnaker, 1978): primäre tr.cond.
Def horizontale Proposition/Lewis: sekundäre tr.cond. (1980a, 38, 1994b,296f).
Neuere Terminologie:
Def A-Intension/primäre Intension/1-Intension/Terminologie/Schwarz: für primäre tr.cond.
Def C-Intension/sekundäre Intension/2-Intension/Terminologie/Schwarz: für sekundäre tr.cond.
Def A-Proposition/1-Proposition/C-Proposition/2-Propsition/Terminologie/Schwarz: entsprechend. (Jackson 1998a,2004, Lewis 2002b,Chalmers 1996b, 56 65)
Def meaning1/ Terminologie/Lewis/Schwarz: (1975,173): sekundäre tr.cond.
Def meaning2/Lewis/Schwarz: komplexe Funktion von Situationen und Welten auf Wahrheitswerte, „zweidimensionale Intension“.
Schwarz: Problem: damit sind ganz verschiedene Dinge gemeint:
primäre tr.cond./LewisVsStalnaker: bei Lewis nicht über metasprachliche Diagonalisierung bestimmt wie Stalnakers diagonale Propositionen. Auch nicht über A priori-Implikation wie bei Chalmers primären Propositionen.
- - -
Schwarz I 227
a posteriori-Notwendigkeit/Metaphysik/Lewis/Schwarz: normale Fälle sind keine Fälle von starker Notwendigkeit. Man kann herausfinden Bsp dass Blair Premier ist oder Bsp Abendstern = Morgenstern. LewisVsInwagen/LewisVsStalnaker: andere Fälle (die sich empirisch nicht herausfinden lassen) gibt es nicht.
LewisVs starke Notwendigkeit: hat in seiner Modallogik keinen Platz. >LewisVs Teleskoptheorie: MöWe sind nicht wie ferne Planeten, bei denen man herausfinden kann, welche es wohl gibt.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Re III
St. Read
Philosophie der Logik Hamburg 1997

Re IV
St. Read
Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic 1st Edition Oxford 1995

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Swoyer, Chr. Armstrong Vs Swoyer, Chr.
 
Books on Amazon
Arm III 160
Properties/Swoyer: (1982) thesis: prop. must have "essential characteristics". But they are not phenomenal and do not consist in prop of prop. They are the relations of the "nomic implications" which they have for other prop. VsSwoyer: (elsewhere: PutnamVsLewis: prop cannot simply exist): Why should prop have essential characteristics at all? Perhaps their identity is simple.
Otherwise one would have to give up Leibniz’s principle of the indistinguishability of the identical (in terms of prop.).
E.g. prop. may be different, such as: most of us would say that particulars (P) can be different, although they have all features in common. ((s) ultimately distinguished by local prop?) (> Lit.: Armstrong, Universals, 1978, Chapter 9.1).
SwoyerVs: these "simple" distinction must be grounded in something: its spatiotemporal localization.
ArmstrongVsSwoyer: But suppose, as it seems conceivable, that there are Ps that are not spatio-temporal. Pace Thomas Aquinas: E.g. Two angels could not be different, even though they have all features in common.
Armstrong: Why not just a "simple property" that has no essential characteristic, but simply is "itself"?.

AR II = Disp
D. M. Armstrong

In
Dispositions, Tim Crane, London New York 1996

AR III
D. Armstrong
What is a Law of Nature? Cambridge 1983
Truth-conditional Sem. Katz Vs Truth-conditional Sem.
 
Books on Amazon
II 145
Semantik/Katz/Cresswell: (Katz 1972 und viele andere Artikel). KatzVswahrheitskonditionale Semantik/KatzVswako: 1. (Katz 1982): alle anderen Ansätze außer Katz’ eigenem reduzieren Bedeutung auf etwas anderes, unter anderem auf WB.
VsKatz: seine eigene Kritik hängt davon ab, daß er schon weiß, daß WB etwas anderes sind als Bedeutung. ((s) Also können die von ihm kritisierten Ansätze nicht zirkulär sein).
CresswellVsKatz: seine Semantik ist nicht falsch, sie ist aber unvollständig.
Semantik/Cresswell: „semantische Daten“: Bsp Bedeutsamkeit von Sätzen, Bsp Synonymie von Satzpaaren usw.
II 146
KatzVs wahrheitskonditionale Semantik/Cresswell: 2. sie hat zur Folge, daß alle logisch äquivalenten Sätze dieselbe Bedeutung haben. Insbesondere in der Version der MöWe-Semantik. (1982, 190): Katz anerkennt, daß es Versuche zur Lösung gibt. Bsp Lewis (1972). KatzVsLewis/Cresswell: Katz’ Ansatz scheint Strukturierte Bedeutungen zu verlangen.
lexikalische Dekomposition/Katz/Cresswell: diese wird von Katz gebraucht, um Bedeutungen auf semantische Grundbegriffe zurückzuführen.

Katz
J. J. Katz
The Metaphysics of Meaning

The author or concept searched is found in the following disputes of scientific camps.
Disputed term/author/ism Pro/Versus
Entry
Reference
Possible World Versus Field I 205
possible worlds FieldVs / FieldVsLewis: worlds are dubious entities - FieldVsLewis: E.g. a sentence of the form "MS" is not, as Lewis says, an abbreviation for a set without modal operator, claiming the existence of a world.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980
Functionalism Versus Field II 30
Field: per materialism, per physicalism -FieldVsFunctionalism / FieldVsLewis: not sufficient for Brentano s problem - FieldVsInstrumentalism: belief ascriptions can be literally true and they are not just useful tools.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

The author or concept searched is found in the following 12 theses of the more related field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Values Harman, G.
 
Books on Amazon
Graeser I 190
Value / Valuation / Lewis: values ​​should be regarded as feeling, belief, desire - ultimately desire of desire - HarmanVsLewis: 1 intrinsic desire of a higher level is misleading. "Desire" has the meaning of intention and is like any intention, already self-referential.
I 191
FrankfurtVsHarman: in danger of blurring the distinction between purpose and agent, and thus committed to the assumption that targets are to some extent equipped with means.

Grae I
A. Graeser
Positionen der Gegenwartsphilosophie. München 2002
Cond. Prblty Jackson, F.
 
Books on Amazon
Lewis V 154
Jackson These: "Implikatur-der-Robustheit"-Thorie für die konditionale Wschk. Pro: JacksonVsLewis: Bsp "Fred wird nicht lernen und selbst wenn, wird er durchfallen". Wenn (nach Lewis) hier das Konditional nur behauptbar ist, wenn das Antezedens nicht geleugnet werden kann, wie kann es dann sein, dass dennoch beides zusammen behauptet wird?
Erklärung: das Antezedens wird wegen der Robustheit hinzugefügt. Selbst wenn du glaubst, dass ich mich irren, wenn ich meine, dass Fred nicht lernt, kannst du immer noch wie ich glauben, dass er durchfallen wird. Lewis pro.
Vierdimensionalism. Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Meixner I 51
Raumzeitschnitte/Vierdimensionalismus/Lewis: "Argument der intrinsischen Veränderung": eine Veränderung, die nicht in dem Wechsel der Beziehungen zu etwas außerhalb des Gegenstands bestehen.
Intrinsische Veränderungen kommen oft vor. These Sie lassen sich nur verstehen, wenn man annimmt, daß Gegenstände zeitliche Teile haben.
Ein vorausgehender zeitlicher Teil des Gegenstands hat die Gestalt A und ein nachfolgender die Gestalt B.
MeixnerVsLewis: doch kann man auch einfach sagen, da der Gegenstand - ganz ohne zeitliche Teile ï·" erst diese Gestalt hat, und dann jene andere (wobei die beiden Gestalten Universalien sind, die sich als solche ganz unabhängig von dem Gegenstand und der Zeit bestimmen lassen).

Mei I
U. Meixner
Einführung in die Ontologie Darmstadt 2004
Possible Worlds Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
IV 149
Situation / possible worlds / Lewis: there can also be alternatives within a possible world. -
V 347
"Counterfactuals" (1973)   possible world / Lewis: no two worlds differ in only one respect. (see above): the smallest change takes infinitely many others.
  If there are no similar A-worlds, we should consider whether any A-worlds where B is true, are more similar to our actual world than worlds where B does not apply.
Sw I 13
possible worlds / Realism / Lewis: there are beyond our universe countless other, merely possible worlds. Virtually all other authors VsLewis.   Lewis: this is justified because of the benefits of the underlying theory.
Content Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schw I 161
mentaler Inhalt/Lewis: These ist durch die kausale Rolle bestimmt, durch die typischen Ursachen und Wirkungen. Inhalt/DavidsonVsLewis: der Inhalt hängt von der Sprache ab, die wir sprechen. (Davidson 1975)
Bedeutung/LewisVsDavidson: was die Sätze der öffentlichen Sprache bedeuten, hängt vom Inhalt unserer Erwartungen, Wünsche und Überzeugungen ab.
Schw I 171
Naturalisierung des Gehalts-œ/Repräsentation/Schwarz: These daß mentale Repräsentationen soweit satzartig sind, daß man ihren Inhalt kompositional erklären kann. (vgl. Fodor 1990).
Names Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schw I 223
Namen/Kennzeichnung/Referenz/Kripke/Putnam/Schwarz: (Kripke 1980, Putnam 1975): für Namen und Artausdrücke gibt es keine allgemeinbekannte Beschreibung (Kennzeichnung), die festlegt, worauf der Ausdruck sich bezieht. Kennzeichnungen sind für die Referenz völlig irrelevant. Beschreibungstheorie/LewisVsKripke/LewisVsPutnam/Schwarz: das wiederlegt nur die naive Kennzeichnungstheorie, nach der biographische Taten aufgelistet werden, die dem Referenten notwendig zukommen sollen.
Schw I 228
Namen/Prädikat/Eigenschaft/Lewis: These Namen können alles benennen: statt Prädikat "F" nehmen wir "F-heit" - Prädikate sind keine Namen und benennen nichts - Prädikat/(s): kein sing Term - SchwarzVsLewis/ RussellVsFrege: wenn man annimmt, daß jedem Prädikat ein Name für eine entsprechende Eigenschaft zugeordnet werden kann, folgt Russells Paradoxie.
Satz-Bedeutung Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Grover II 158
Meaning / Lewis / Grover: (Lewis 1972): truth conditions that are mapped by the pictures of circumstances (possible worlds) and contexts to truthe values, grasp the sentence meaning.
Schw I 161
mental content / Lewis: is determined by the causal role, through the typical causes and effects. Content / DavidsonVsLewis: the content depends on the language that we speak. (Davidson 1975)
Meaning / LewisVsDavidson: what sentences of public language mean depends on the content of our expectations, desires and beliefs.

Gro I
D. L. Grover
A Prosentential Theory of Thruth Princeton New Jersey 1992
Values Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Graeser I 190
Wert/Bewertung/Lewis: These Werten sollte man als Fühlen, Glauben, Verlangen betrachten -" letztlich Verlangen von Verlangen - HarmanVsLewis: 1. intrinsisches Verlangen höherer Stufe irreführend - . "Verlangen" hat die Bedeutung von Intention und ist wie jede Intention, schon selbstreferentiell - I 191 FrankfurtVsHarman: in Gefahr, die Unterscheidung zwischen Zweck(en) und Mittel zu verwischen, und damit sich zu der Annahme zu verpflichten, daß Ziele gewissermaßen mit Mitteln ausgestattet seien und uns so begegneten -
Schw I 185
Wertschätzen/Bewerten/Bewertung/Wert/Lewis/Schwarz: Lewis ist These Realist und Naturalist in Bezug auf normative Tatsachen: Werturteile können wahr oder falsch sein. Ihre Wahrheit beruht auf natürlichen, physikalischen Umständen der WiWe.

Grae I
A. Graeser
Positionen der Gegenwartsphilosophie. München 2002
TheoreticalTerms Papineau, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schurz I 215
PapineauVsLewis: his thesis that scientific theories have existence and uniqueness assertions for the reference of the theoretical terms is even doubtful if it is interpreted realistically. In an instrumentalist sense it is untenable. (Papineau, 1996, 6, Fn 5).

Schu I
G. Schurz
Einführung in die Wissenschaftstheorie Darmstadt 2006
personal Identity Perry, J.
 
Books on Amazon
Lewis IV 71
PerryVsLewis: These: die RR (> Lewis) ist nicht dasselbe wie die IR (in diesem Fall). Denn C ist eine Lebenszeit und dann sind nach Perry S1 und S2 I-r, aber wegen der Spaltung nicht R-r. Perry These: jedes Person-Stadium zu einer Zeit muß zu genau einer dP bestimmbar zu der Zeit gehören. Personen können wohlgemerkt Stadien teilen:
Bsp Spaltung: S gehört zu drei Lebenszeiten: C, C1, C2 aber nur zu zwei Zweigen: C1 und C2. S1 gehört zu zwei LZ C und C1 aber nur zu einem Zweig: C1.
Stadien/Perry: werden aber nur dann geteilt, wenn alle bis auf einen Träger nicht bestimmbar sind.
LewisVsPerry: ich gebe zu, daß Zählung durch Identität-zu-t etwas kontraintuitiv ist, aber ist es nicht genauso kontraintuitiv, unbestimmbare Personen auszulassen?
Counterfactual. Condit. Reichenbach, H.
 
Books on Amazon
Fraassen I 118
KoKo/NG/Reichenbach/Goodman/Hempel: These KoKo liefern ein objektives Kriterium dafür, was ein Gesetz ist, oder wenigstens eine gesetzesartige Aussagen. Denn nur Gesetze, nicht aber allgemeine Wahrheiten implizieren KoKo.
Wessel I 306
Es wird vorausgesetzt, dass die Wahrheit der irrealen Bedingungssätze unabhängig von der Gesetzesaussage festgestellt werden kann. Das ist für irreale Bedingungssätze aber in der Regel schwer. WesselVsArmstrong/WesselVsLewis: These der irreale Bedingungs-Satz ist von der realen Aussage abhängig.
Gesetzesaussagen stützen und garantieren die Gültigkeit entsprechender irrealer Konditionale und nicht umgekehrt!

Fr I
B. van Fraassen
The Scientific Image Oxford 1980

We I
H. Wessel
Logik Berlin 1999
Continuant Stalnaker, R.
 
Books on Amazon
I 137
Endurantismus/vierdimensional/Vierdimensionalismus/continuant/Stalnaker: einige Autoren: These continuants haben keine zeitlichen Teile wie Ereignisse. D.h. sie sind in jedem Augenblick mit allen ihren (nur räumlichen) Teilen präsent. Dennoch existieren sie in der Zeit. LewisVsEndurantismus: (Lewis 1986a, 203) diese Auffassung gebraucht die Begriffe "Teil" und "Ganzes" in einem sehr eingeschränkten Sinn.
StalnakerVsLewis: das kann nicht ganz so sein, denn die Vertreter geben zu, dass einige Dinge Bsp Fußballspiele, Kriege, Jahrhunderte durchaus zeitliche Teile haben.
Endurantismus/Stalnaker: selbst wenn das ganze eine unklare Doktrin ist, einige Intuitionen sprechen doch dafür. Ich werde ihn weder verteidigen noch bekämpfen.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 2 theses of an allied field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Values Frankfurt, H.
 
Books on Amazon
Graeser I 190
Value / Validation / Lewis: values should be regarded as feeling, belief, desire - ultimately desire of desire - HarmanVsLewis: 1. intrinsic desire of a higher level is misleading. - "Desire" has the meaning of intention and is just like any intention, already self-referential - I 191 FrankfurtVsHarman: he is at risk, to blur the distinction between the object and means, and thus commits himfelf to the assumption that targets themselves are to a certain extent equipped with means.

Grae I
A. Graeser
Positionen der Gegenwartsphilosophie. München 2002
Werte Watson, G.
 
Books on Amazon
Graeser I 190
Gary Watson: These Verlangen und Werten separat. "motivational system"/"valuational system". - VsLewis

Grae I
A. Graeser
Positionen der Gegenwartsphilosophie. München 2002