Lexicon of Arguments

Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 


[german]  

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 17 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Analysis Moore
 
Books on Amazon
Avramidis I 2o
Analysis/Moore: two types of analysis: 1) eliminate confusion over a concept - 2) Make our thoughts clearer. - Broad: pro 1) (> Quine, Word and Object) - Moore pro 2) - WisdomVsMoore: new level of concept - (asymmetry: Example Analysis of nations discovers something about individuals). - MooreVsWisdom: we have to stay on the same level! (Symmetry). - Ad 1)/Avramides: understanding a concept through other concepts - ad 2): Location of a concept in the network. - These are two interpretations of the same biconditional.

Determinism Pauen
 
Books on Amazon
V 274
Determinism / Van Inwagen / Pauen: the principle of the causal closure says that only physical explanation may be used - it is not about a need for certain causal chains - only requirement: that for any higher order describable change there is a physically describable change - thesis: from full description later states can be derived - Pauen: determinism is more than controversial.
V 275
Determinism / freedom / Moore: determinism does not entitle us to the conclusion that nothing else could have happened - ambiguity of "can": a) possible actions - b) physical impossibility - Moore: For the purposes of a) it is possible to say "I could have decided otherwise" - ("conditional analysis") - VsMoore: Example he would falsely call psychological coercion "free".

Pau I
M. Pauen
Grundprobleme der Philosophie des Geistes Frankfurt 2001

Ethics Brentano
 
Books on Amazon:
Franz Brentano
Chisholm II = Peter Koller Ethik bei Chisholm in Philosophische Ausätze zu Ehren Roderick M. Chisholm Marian David/Leopold Stubenberg (Hg), Amsterdam 1986

Chisholm II 276
Ethics/Brentano/Moore/Koller: Brentano and Moore converge in amazing ways. Ethics/Brentano/Moore: The ultimate goal of right action: "the best thing you can do":
---
II 279
The greatest possible sum of the good which can be attained. (stock) VsMoore/VsBrentano: that does not only assume that we already know what the good is, but also that we can recognize the best among the achievable good.
So that there is something that is intrinsic and recognizable good.
Brentano/Moore: assert for this reason that there is a direct, immediate knowledge of what is good in itself. Immediate evidence.

Good/Ethics/Value/Brentano/Moore: the good is what you should desire and should be taken for good.
Brentano: what it is worth to love it with a love that is properly characterized for its own sake.
---
II 280
E.g. (Brentano): pleasure, clear insight, knowledge, joy (if it is not joy in the bad), correctness of our judgment and of our emotions, (of our love, hate, and will). Brentano: Principle of summation (of the good:
1. Something good is better than something bad
2. the existence of good is better than its non-existence
3. a greater good is better than a smaller one.
---
II 280
Ethics/Value/Good/Moore: Question: What things in isolation are to be considered for good on their own? This also requires the determination of levels of value. ---
II 281
Method of isolation. This is why pleasure, taken alone, is of no great value for Moore. Only together with the experience of beautiful things it has a valuable force. This leads to the
Principle of Organic Units: Many things take on quite different properties, depending on the context. (MooreVsBrentano). ((s) "syncategorematic" values.)
MooreVsBrentano: since the inner value is characterized by connecting several simple properties, it can not simply match the sum of its parts.
For example, when no one is aware of a beautiful object, it has no value.
---
II 282
Method of Isolation/Moore: that are now applied again to recognize the value of such organic units. Thesis all things that have real value are complex organic entities.
E.g. the joys of human intercourse, enjoying beautiful things.
E.g. Bad: Enjoying ugly things, cruelty, hating the good, etc.
Exception: Pain: is already an evil without any connection to others.
Mixed virtues/Moore: as whole things clearly good, but contain something bad: e.g. courage, compassion, (hating the bad) knowledge of bad or ugly things.
---
II 283
Acting/ethics/Brentano/Moore: that is sufficient as a basis to answer the question: what action is right? Of several possibilities for action is only the one right that either produces more or at least not less good things in the world. It is indifferent whether this good is beneficial to the agent himself, or to others.
An action is therefore correct, if it has correct consequences.
Criterion/Ethics/Moore/Brentano: the purpose of doing as much good as possible in the world is then the criterion for correct action.
Judgement: Problem: in regard to this our knowledge is always incomplete.
---
II 284
Moore/Brentano: therefore ethics cannot provide general rules. We have "rules of medium generality". These then apply in the majority of cases. Ethics/values/ontology/intrinsic properties/Moore/Brentano/Koller: ontological question: what are the objects of the intrinsic value concepts, on which things can the concepts of the intrinsic good and bad be applied at all? What is the logical structure of these concepts, can the method of isolation always be applied?
---
II 287
KollerVsBrentano/KollerVsMoore: the questions about the epistemological justification of intrinsic valuations and the question of their suitability for a sustainable foundation of ethics are precisely the questions that make the approach of Brentano and Moore appear doubtful.

Brent I
F. Brentano
Psychology from An Empirical Standpoint (Routledge Classics) London 2014


Chi I
R. Chisholm
Die erste Person Frankfurt 1992

Chi III
Roderick M. Chisholm
Erkenntnistheorie Graz 2004
Generality Stroud
 
Books on Amazon
I 206
General/Special/skepticism/verificationism/generalization/interior/exterior/Stroud: Descartes with him the special is representative and can therefore be generalized. - VerificationismVsGeneralization: it considers it suspicious: not apply statements of the system to the system itself. - StroudVsCarnap: the problem interior/exterior is not the same as that of the general and special. - StroudVsCarnap: the sentence that Descartes does not know whether he is sitting by the fire is not meaningless, only in connection to the skeptical presumption that it is not verifiable. - Problem: the verificationism could came easily in the situation to have to assume that all of our everyday language would be useless. ---
I 264
Public/knowledge/Stroud: there are indeed general statements about knowledge: e.g. that someone knows something about Sicily of the 4th century.. - E.g. that no one knows the causes of cancer. - VsMoore: that he does not achieve a general statement about knowledge, but is not due to a lack of generality.

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984

Good Putnam
 
Books on Amazon
V 273
Non-cognitivism/Moore thesis: "good" is completely outside the natural sciences - E.g. "good" cannot be = "contributes to the utility maximization" - because then it would not only be wrong to say "it is good, but does not contribute to maximizing" but self-contradictory, and that should be excluded - Property/Term/PutnamVsMoore: confusion of property and term: - that two concepts are different, does not entail that being good is not the same property as being P.

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990

Good Quine
 
Books on Amazon:
Willard V. O. Quine
V 77
"Good"/language learning/QuineVsMoore/QuineVsTradition: two factors: perceptual similarity and desire - distinction between aesthetically good and morally good: the former feels good - the latter announces the former - moral/Quine: is like taste: a question of sociality.

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003

Good Moore
 
Books on Amazon
Stegmüller IV 181
Argument der offenen Frage/gut/Definition/Moore: Angenommen jemand behaupte, "gut" könne man definieren als "der Lebensfreude förderlich". Dann könnten wir trotzdem immer noch die Frage verstehen: "zugegeben, es fördert die Lebensfreude, aber ist es auch gut?".
Fazit: "gut" muss eine einfache, nichtanalysierbare, nichtnatürliche Qualität bedeuten.
StegmüllerVsMoore: das kann sich nur auf das sittliche Gutsein beziehen.
IV 182
Wir könnten immer noch vermuten, dass es in moralischen und nichtmoralischen Kontexten einen gemeinsamen Bedeutungskern gibt.
IV 186
"Gut"/Moore/offene Frage/Mackie/Stegmüller: die Lösung von Moores Problem: diejenigen Erfordernisse, in Bezug wir fragen ob x gut ist, sind nicht identisch mit denen, für die wir bereits zugestanden haben, dass x ihnen genügt. Vs: manche meinen, nur die Annahme objektiver Werte könne dem Argument der offenen Frage widerstehen. Nur vom Standpunkt der "Gesamtwirklichkeit" seien alle Erfordernisse berücksichtigt.
MackieVs: es ist eine trügerische Hoffnung, dass es etwas gäbe, das allen denkbaren Arten von Erfordernissen genügen könnte.

Internal/external Carnap
 
Books on Amazon
II 207
Internal/External/Carnap: internal: within a frame: E.g. a unicorn is a mythical creature - external: E.g. existence of numbers or physical things.
Stroud I 183
External/Internal/Carnap/Quine/Stroud: Quine: distinction between "Categories Questions" and "Subset Questions": external: only one type variable for all things - then the question "is there such and such?" covers the whole range (Category) - internal: a variable for any kind of thing: Subset question, we come to generality by letting a kind of variable go over all things. Stroud: nevertheless same syntax. - Carnap: therefore different languages.
I 184
Thing language: here questions of existence possible.
I 185
Practical Question/Carnap: here the solution consists in an action. ((s)> Dummett: Manifestation) - Important argument: Carnap: existential questions must be treated as practical matters - choice of question is a practical question (of convention). - Problem: CarnapVsMoore: The kind of choice cannot be answered internally - Thing language: is efficient, but does not show a reality in the world.

Ca I
R. Carnap
Die alte und die neue Logik
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996

Ca III
R. Carnap
Philosophie als logische Syntax
In
Philosophie im 20.Jahrhundert, Bd II, A. Hügli/P.Lübcke (Hg), Reinbek 1993

Ca IV
R. Carnap
Mein Weg in die Philosophie Stuttgart 1992

Ca VI
R. Carnap
Der Logische Aufbau der Welt Hamburg 1998

CA VII = PiS
R. Carnap
Sinn und Synonymität in natürlichen Sprachen
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Ca VIII (= PiS)
R. Carnap
Über einige Begriffe der Pragmatik
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Knowledge Hume
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 105f
Knowledge/proof of existence/existence/Hume/Stroud: two principles: 1. No one knows of the existence of something when it is not perceived directly by someone> Apprehension: unordered) or he knows what he has perceived directly, is a sign of the existence of this thing.
2. No one can know that a thing is a sign of something else, if he has not perceived these two things (thing and sign) directly. (> Acquaintance)
MooreVsHume: both principles are wrong: E.g. I know that this pencil exists. - According to Hume I could not know that, so they are wrong. - This is a reductio ad absurdum.
StroudVsMoore: Hume's principles are valid. - Moore: for him it is relevant what is safe, the pencil or the principles. - Skepticism/Stroud/(s): but is not a question of safety.
D. Hume
I Gilles Delueze David Hume, Frankfurt 1997 (Frankreich 1953,1988)
II Norbert Hoerster Hume: Existenz und Eigenschaften Gottes aus Speck(Hg) Grundprobleme der großen Philosophen der Neuzeit I Göttingen, 1997
Knowledge Kant
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 130
Knowledge / skepticism / KantVsDescartes: Who reads a proof needs to know at the end. - Problem: this is only possible in the sciences, not in philosophy. - KantVsTradition: treats knowledge of the outside world always indirectly or inferentially. - Solution / Kant: immediate perception / = consciousness of external things. That is a sufficient proof of their reality. - With inferential access skepticism would be inevitable. - Per skepticism: forces to show that we have acquired our knowledge. KantVsMoore / Stroud: Moore does not show this.
I 134
Skepticism / Kant: is refuted only by a proof of realism.
I. Kant
I Günter Schulte Kant Einführung (Campus) Frankfurt 1994
Externe Quellen. ZEIT-Artikel 11/02 (Ludger Heidbrink über Rawls)
Volker Gerhard "Die Frucht der Freiheit" Plädoyer für die Stammzellforschung ZEIT 27.11.03
Knowledge Wittgenstein
 
Books on Amazon
McDowell I 82
Knowledge/ostension/measuring/Wittgenstein: E.g. Someone says: I know how high I am! and put his hand on his head. > Color: e.g. "This hue". ---
VI 212
Knowledge/certainty/certitude/WittgensteinVsMoore/Schulte: if doubts are excluded, then "knowledge" is no meaningful concept. - e.g. pain has nothing to do with knowledge. - e.g. at best after an accident I can assure myself that I have two hands. - (> Moores hands).

W II
L. Wittgenstein
Vorlesungen 1930-35 Frankfurt 1989

W III
L. Wittgenstein
Das Blaue Buch - Eine Philosophische Betrachtung Frankfurt 1984

W IV
L. Wittgenstein
Tractatus Logico Philosophicus Frankfurt/M 1960


MD I
J. McDowell
Geist und Welt Frankfurt 2001
Language Dummett
 
Books on Amazon
I 11 ff
Evans: Thesis: Language can be explained by modes of thinking - DummettVsEvans: vice versa! (Frege ditto)
II 448
DummettVsQuine, VsDavidson: not idiolect, but common language prevails. (> Dogmas) 1) Frege, Wittgenstein earlier: language as a means of representation or reproduction of reality, "the meaning of a sentence is its truth condition".
2) later Wittgenstein, Austin, Strawson, Searle: everyday language and speech act theory: the constitutive rules of the language are not primarily a representation of reality, but allow actions of various kinds. "the sense of an expression is its use".
- - -
McDowell I 152
Language/Dummett: 1) an instrument of communication 2) carrier of meaning. None should be primary.
Language/McDowellVsDummett: both are secondary. Primarily, language is a source of tradition. (McDowell per Gadamer). To acquire language means to acquire spirit.
- - -
Dum III 81
Language/infinite/Dummett: each quantity of knowledge is finite, but must allow an understanding of infinitely many sentences.
III 145
Idiolect/DummettVs: Language is not a family of similar idiolects, but the speaker declares responsibility of the common usages - without fully dominating them.
III 150
The concept of idiolect is important to explain variations, but idiolect can be explained by language, not vice versa. - - -
Horwich I 461
Language/DavidsonVsDummett: is not a "veil" - it is a network of inferential relations. - Nothing beyond "human abilities" - Like a stone against which we hit ourselves - and that is stone by stone, bit by bit. ((s)> fulfillment,not making true.) - This applies to "this is good" and "this is red". - DavidsonVsMoore/DavidsonVsDummett.

Du I
M. Dummett
Ursprünge der analytischen Philosophie Frankfurt 1992

Du III
M. Dummett
Wahrheit Stuttgart 1982


MD I
J. McDowell
Geist und Welt Frankfurt 2001

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994
Language Acquisition Quine
 
Books on Amazon:
Willard V. O. Quine
V 68
Language learning/Quine: the success depends on whether the similarity standards match. - What do the episodes have in common?. ---
V 71
Approval/learning/Quine: instead of reward: is more general. - There are not enough situations for rewards, because not everything is pronounced. - Language learning: not only by linguistic statements, but also through non-verbal responses. - Even animals. - Approval: leads to voicing one's own sentences -> Gavagai: if you just wait until the parents say rabbit, you will not find out that everything that is called a rabbit is also referred to as an animal. - RI:question and answers game is essential here. - Approval must be obtained. - ((s) reward has to be confirmed otherwis). ---
V 75
1-red from the child, yes from the mother - 2) vice versa - generalization: by previously learned expressions - criterion for approval: readiness, to express an observation sentence on one’s own initiative. ---
V 77
Good/language learning/QuineVsMoore/QuineVsTradition: two factors: perception similarity and desire. - Distinction between aesthetically good and morally well: the former feels good, the latter announces former. - Moral/Quine: as flavor: community thing. ---
V 113
Truth/language learning/Quine: somehow such a connection of meaning and truth is indicative for learning, regardless of the logical particles - we learn the use of declarative sentences by learning the truth conditions - but truth value is learned late. ---
V 121
Compliance/language learning/Quine: in casual conversation - not hidden meanings. - ((s) internal objects). ---
V 147
Set theory/language learning/Quine: set theory/language learning/Quine: by imagining the substitution quantification as a simulation of the referential quantification, we imagine the general term as a simulation of abstract singular terms, of names of attributes or names of classes. - Class name: abstract singular term, not general term. ---
VI 89f
Whole sentence/holophrastic/language learning/Quine: we need whole sentences to define that e.g. a mirrored object is meant - or reflection. - ((s) or mirroring).

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003

Moore s Hands Carnap
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 180
Verificationism VsMoore / Carnap / Moores hands / Stroud: Carnap goes much deeper than Moore because he recognizes the need for justification in a positive philosophy.

Ca I
R. Carnap
Die alte und die neue Logik
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996

Ca III
R. Carnap
Philosophie als logische Syntax
In
Philosophie im 20.Jahrhundert, Bd II, A. Hügli/P.Lübcke (Hg), Reinbek 1993

Ca IV
R. Carnap
Mein Weg in die Philosophie Stuttgart 1992

Ca VI
R. Carnap
Der Logische Aufbau der Welt Hamburg 1998

CA VII = PiS
R. Carnap
Sinn und Synonymität in natürlichen Sprachen
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Ca VIII (= PiS)
R. Carnap
Über einige Begriffe der Pragmatik
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Moore s Hands Stroud
 
Books on Amazon
I 83
Moore's hands/existence proof/Stroud: Moore has misunderstood Kant that he doubted the existence of our outside world. - ((s) only our knowledge of it.) - StroudVsMoore: this is only possible in response to a specific question - VsMoore: false evidence: error that the premises are known to be true - ((s) there are hands doubted) - (He is not wrong if he is not VsSkepticism) - MalcolmVsMoore: no answer to skepticism - does not say what is wrong with his doubts - instead of hands, he could not take "that tree there" and prove by clear view on him - (but that is what he seems to do). ---
I 89
AmbrosVsMoore: insufficient as direct empirical position. ---
I 90
Malcolm: Moore argues linguistically. ---
I 92
AmbroseVsMoore: he thinks, the special case of the hands can be distinguished from other things of the outside world - but they cannot. ---
I 93
Wittgenstein: if you succeed in the proof of the hands, we will give you the rest. ---
I 94
Moore himself: considered his evidence not linguistical but empirical. ---
I 99
Moores hands/skepticism/Stroud: the skepticism does not state anything that Moore proves to be false - that is the importance of Moore's proof - there must be a general sentence that there would be no external things, which Moore refutes - then the skepticism would be much more complex and difficult. ---
I 114
Moores hands/skepticism/Stroud: "I know that here is a hand": one cannot deny that there are questions to which this is a response. - VsMalcolm: Moore also knows what he is doing - he just does not answer skepticism. - A deficiency in Moores proof is only there if there is a general question about knowledge, which makes it impossible for Moore to answer. - Outside world/Stroud: unlike skepticism: here Moore has revealed the existence of external things - (as we know). - Skepticism /(s): concerns then also our external world: this could be dreamed?
---
I 115
Stroud: in the questions of the existence of the external world no particular philosophical problem is answered - E.g. direct question: were there apples in Sicily BC? - Then we have an idea how we (ask historians) can find out. - Scepticism: but that does not work, if you do not know anything about the world - Knowledge/(s): if knowledge questions are answered, existence is already implied. ---
I 117/18
Skepticism/Stroud: can only be refuted from the "distanced position" (external knowledge, philosophical, not scientific) - then I cannot rely on certain things like hands. - External knowledge/Stroud: is not a more general form of knowledge - (believing that was Moore's mistake) - the philosophical question cannot be expressed by a common form of words - Pro Moore: especially his refusal to take the external position shows the importance of his remarks. Skepticism/Stroud: does not only ask what is known, but how it is known. StroudVsMoore: his evidence is not empirical.
---
I 124
General/Special/Moore's hands/skepticism/Stroud: there is nothing wrong with Moore's approach (that he provides the general questions of philosophy with certain answers - how else should you answer general questions? ---
I 133
Premises/proof/Moore's hands/Stroud: Moore was aware that he has not proven his premises - but premises must not be proven anyway - many things can be known directly without proof.

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984

Morals Schiffer
 
Books on Amazon:
Stephen Schiffer
I 153
Moral/physicalism/positivism pro Moore: moral properties cannot be identified with natural aptitude - but, VsMoore: it does not follow that there was a realm of non-natural (moral) properties.

Schi I
St. Schiffer
Remnants of Meaning Cambridge 1987

Necessity Putnam
 
Books on Amazon
Kripke I 141
Necessity/needed/Putnam: "cats are animals" is less necessary than "bachelors are unmarried". ---
Putnam V 72
Metaphysically necessary/Kripke: Putnam: it is "metaphysically necessary" that water is H20, but that is explained by earthly chemistry and earthly facts about speaker intentions regarding reference. - When describing a hypothetical liquid which is not H20 and merely resembles water, one does not describe any possible worlds, in which H2O is not water. ---
V 274
Metaphysically necessary/heat/Kripke/Putnam: Possible Worlds, where heat does not corresponds with molecular motion, are possible. - Language: but then we say that there is a different mechanism that triggers heat sensation. Identity/Heat/Molecular motion/Kripke: the identity is necessary, but not a priori - the statement is empirical, but necessary.
Molecular motion is an essential property of the temperature - KripkeVsMoore: then equating goodness with utility maximization cannot only be contingently wrong.
KripkeVsNon-Cognitivism: from the fact that the words are not synonymous, one cannot conclude that the characteristics are not identical.
---
V 279
Pro Moore: He was right that our concepts of natural science are more neutral as opposed to ethical ones. - VsMoore: but that does not mean that the good did not exist.

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990


The author or concept searched is found in the following 31 controversies.
Disputed term/author/ism Author Vs Author
Entry
Reference
Ambrose, A. Stroud Vs Ambrose, A.
 
Books on Amazon
I 89
Skeptizismus/Ambrose/Malcolm/Stroud: beide denken, dass der Skeptizismus - richtig verstanden – nicht empirisch - durch die Sinne - widerlegt werden kann. Skeptizismus/Ambrose: Thesis: der Skeptizismus kann nicht einmal beschreiben, welche Art Ding einen Beweis für "Es gibt Dinge der Außenwelt" darstellen könnte. Es gibt keine beschreibbaren Umstände, in denen man sagen könnte, dass jemand als das wissend beschrieben werden könnte. Also kann der Satz „Niemand weiß, ob Dinge existieren“ nicht falsifiziert werden (A. S. 402) Der Skeptizismus argumentiert für eine logische Unmöglichkeit des Wissen von der Außenwelt und nicht für eine empirische Tatsache.
Jeder Satz wie "Ich weiß nicht, ob da ein Dollar in meiner Tasche ist"
I 90
ist für den Skeptiker "notwendig wahr".
I 91
MalcolmVsMoore/AmbroseVsMoore/Stroud: sie richten sich gegen das, was Moore zu tun glaubt. Er könnte es auch gar nicht! StroudVsAmbrose/StroudVsMalcolm: wir werden sehen, dass diese beiden Kritiken fehlschlagen, aber dafür müssen wir einen weiten Weg mit Moore zusammen gehen, um zu sehen, wie er seinen Beweis meint und dass er damit sogar das tut was er glaubt, auch wenn er etwas anderes erreicht.
I 92
AmbroseVsMoore: für sie ist Moore nicht in der Position das zu tun was er tun möchte, nämlich einen direkten empirischen Beweis geben zu können. Pointe: Moore möchte auf Dinge zeigen, die sich in ihren Eigenschaften von anderen Dingen unterscheiden“ Aber das kann er gar nicht, weil die einzigen Dinge auf die er zeigen kann und auch zu zeigen beabsichtigt, "externe Dinge" sind, und die haben alle dieselbe Eigenschaft, "extern" zu sein. D.h. er hat gar keinen Kontrast zu anderen Dingen, den er aber haben müsste, um überhaupt etwas über externe Dinge im allgemeinen zu sagen. Er kann nur auf einige externe Dinge im Gegensatz zu anderen externen Dingen zeigen, um Unterschiede zwischen diesen zu zeigen, aber damit kann er keinen Existenzbeweis für externe Dinge im allgemeinen leisten. (Zirkulär)
Existenzbeweis/Oberbegriff/allgemeines /Besonderes/Lösung: man kann die Existenz von Münzen beweisen, indem man auf einen Groschen zeigt.
MooreVsAmbrose: (Moore S. 672): besteht darauf, dass sein Beweis empirisch ist, und dass er damit den Satz "Es gibt keine äußeren Dinge" als falsch beweist.
I 93
Bsp so wie wenn man auf einen Groschen zeigt, damit beweisen kann, dass es wenigstens ein äußeres Ding gibt. Moore gibt zu, dass es Unterschiede zwischen den Begriffen "äußeres Ding" und "Münze" gibt, aber nicht in Bezug auf die Möglichkeit, auf Instanzen zu zeigen.
Zeigen/MooreVsMalcolm/MooreVsAmbrose: kann man sicher nur auf äußere Dinge, aber auf innere Objekte kann man die Aufmerksamkeit lenken. Damit hat der Term "äußeres Ding" wohl einen signifikanten Kontrast zu anderen Dingen, die nicht unter diese Klasse fallen: es sind eben Dinge, auf die man zeigen kann.
"äußeres Ding"/Moore: ist wie "Münze" einfach ein allgemeinerer Term. Aber er ist genauso empirisch wie "Münze".
Moore: die einzige Widerlegung könnte in seinen Augen sein, dass man zeigt, dass er nicht bewiesen habe, dass hier eine Hand ist und dort eine andere.
Stroud: dann wäre der einzige Einwand, dass die Prämissen nicht wirklich gewusst werden. Das scheint Wittgenstein in "Über Gewissheit" im Sinn zu haben:
Moores Hände/Wittgenstein: "wenn du weißt, dass hier eine Hand ist, gestehen wir dir den Rest zu". (on certainty, 1969, §1).
MooreVsAmbrose/Stroud: weil Moore seinen Beweis für empirisch hält, geht er über Ambrose’ Einwand hinweg, er mache bloß eine Empfehlung für den Sprachgebrauch.
I 94
Er sieht sich selbst so, dass er mit einer Tatsache - hier ist eine Hand – eine andere beweist: - dass es äußere Dinge gibt. Sprachgebrauch/Existenzbeweis/Sprache/MooreVsAmbrose: ich kann nicht angenommen haben, dass die Tatsache, dass ich eine Hand habe, etwas darüber beweist, wie der Ausdruck "äußere Dinge" gebraucht werden sollte. (Moore, 674)
Genauso wie nichts über der Sprachgebrauch von Bsp "Ich weiß, dass hier drei Druckfehler sind" gezeigt wird, wenn ich zeige, dass es auf dieser Seite drei Druckfehler gibt. Hier geht es um nichts Linguistisches. Nichts darüber, wie Wörter gebraucht werden sollten folgt aus den Prämissen.

MooreVsMalcolm/Stroud: dann muss auch Malcolms Interpretation falsch sein. Dass hier eine Hand ist, beweist überhaupt nichts darüber, wie irgendwelche Ausdrücke gebraucht werden sollten.
MalcolmVsMoore: Malcolm glaubt, dass Moore ihn nicht zurückgewiesen hat und ihm sogar eigentlich zustimmt.
StroudVsMalcolm: das kann aber nicht sein, wenn Moore das tut, was er sagt.
MalcolmVsMoore: weiteres Argument: er kann gar nicht das getan haben, was er tun wollte
Skeptizismus/Sprache/MooreVsAmbrose: der Skeptiker mag denken, er habe a priori Gründe für die Leugnung von äußeren Dingen oder von Wissen darüber.
I 96
Aber selbst dann bedeutet das nicht, dass er nicht empirisch zurückgewiesen werden könnte. Angenommen, jemand behauptet, er habe a priori Gründe dafür, dass es keine Dinge der Außenwelt gibt. Gerade dann kann er durch einfaches empirisches Zeigen solcher Gegenstände widerlegt werden.
Moore/StroudVsMalcolm/StroudVsAmbrose: die Reaktion von Ambrose und Malcolm ist immer noch , dass Moore genau das tut, was er zu tun glaubt.

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984
Austin, John L. Putnam Vs Austin, John L.
 
Books on Amazon
Hacking I 179
AustinVsMoore: there is an independent opportunity to pick out facts: ostension. Then we put on assertions by combining referring expressions and names for properties and relations. PutnamVsAustin: he must now accept that this approach of Austin is scuppered by Löwenheim because there is no possibility of independent reference.

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu II
H. Putnam
Repräsentation und Realität Frankfurt 1999

Pu III
H. Putnam
Für eine Erneuerung der Philosophie Stuttgart 1997

Pu IV
H. Putnam
Pragmatismus Eine offene Frage Frankfurt 1995

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990
Burnyeat, M. Stroud Vs Burnyeat, M.
 
Books on Amazon
I 123
Skeptizismus/BurnyeatVsMoore: (in Philosophy 1977 S 396f) er kann sich nicht aus der traditionellen epistemischen Position befreien. Er müsste die Sicherheit seiner Beispiele erklären können. Er brauchte ein allgemeines Grundprinzip, das seinen Glauben erklärt. StroudVsBurnyeat: ich sehe nicht, wie eine allgemeine Erklärung und Rechtfertigung
I 124
der Idee, „dass Einzelbeispiele das erste sind, auf das ein Philosoph antworten sollte“, Moore von der traditionellen epistemischen Position ausnehmen sollte. Burnyeat: Moore sollte wissen, worauf der Skeptizismus aus ist, und sollte erklären, warum er das nicht erfüllen könne.
Allgemeines/Besonderes/StroudVsBurnyeat: an Moores Vorgehen ist nichts falsches (dass er die allgemeinen Fragen der Philosophen mit bestimmten Antworten versieht. Wie sonst sollte man allgemeine Fragen beantworten?
Moore/Stroud: erklärt nicht, wie die Fragen des Skeptizismus zustande kommen oder warum sie nicht gestellt werden könnten. Er leugnet sie einfach.

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984
Cavell, St. Stroud Vs Cavell, St.
 
Books on Amazon
I 260
Skeptizismus/Cavell/Stroud: pro Cavell: er zeigt einen Lösungsweg in der richtigen Allgemeinheit.
I 261
CavellVsSkepticism/Stroud: keine Aussage; die der traditionelle Erkenntnistheoretiker hervorbringen kann, ist repräsentativ für unsere epistemische Situation gegenüber der Welt in der Allgemeinheit, die er anstrebt. Das Urteil des Erkenntnistheoretikers oder des Skeptikers ist stets partikulär. Es kann nicht verallgemeinert werden. Stroud: Cavell muss zeigen, dass der Philosoph (Skeptiker, Erkenntnistheoretiker) die Bedeutung jeder partikularen Behauptung falsch konstruieren muss, um seine Verallgemeinerung vorzutäuschen.
StroudVsCavell: ist es denn wahr, dass Bsp Descartes gar keine „konkrete“ Behauptung aufstellt? Die ganz allgemeine Tatsache, dass die verschiedenen Sprachhandlungen (Sprechakte?) wie Behaupten, Fragen usw. alle ihre eigenen Äußerungsbedingungen haben, ist nicht hinreichend, um seinen Cavells Punkt zu begründen. Wir müssen wissen, was die Bedingungen sind, um etwas zu behaupten um zu zeigen, dass sie nicht erfüllt sind in den Fällen, die der Philosoph erwägt. Und es genügt auch nicht nur für Behauptungen, es muss gezeigt werden, dass die Bedingungen für keine Weise etwas zu sagen oder zu denken, die die Zwecke des Philosophen erfüllen könnten,
I 262
hier erfüllt sein könnten. Problem: aber was sind denn „alle“ möglichen Weisen, etwas zu sagen?
Es scheint, dass es nur eine bestimmte (einzelne, partikulare)) Instanz von Wissen geben müsste, die wir alle als Wissen betrachten würden.
Bsp er stellt sich vor (oder findet sich vor in der Situation) am Kamin zu sitzen. Er fragt sich, ob er weiß und wie er weiß, dass er dort sitzt. Selbst wenn er hier keine Behauptung aufstellt, sieht es so aus, als ob er (StroudVsCavell) dennoch fragen könnte, ob er weiß, ob er in dem Augenblick dort sitzt und eine Basis entdeckt für jedes solche Wissen, und dann anschließend die Verlässlichkeit dieser Basis einschätzen kann.
StroudVsCavell: er könnte dann zu dem Schluss kommen, dass er es nicht weiß, obwohl er gar
keine (Wissens-)Behauptung aufgestellt hat! Wenn das richtig ist, scheint er doch keine konkrete Behauptung (Kontext) zu brauchen, um seine Position in dieser Situation zu bewerten.
Stroud: damit beschreibe ich Descartes’ Projekt als Versuch, sein Wissen zu überprüfen.
Stroud: damit will er die Verlässlichkeit von allem überprüfen, das er seit seiner Jugend behauptet hat. Es scheint dann nicht wesentlich, dass er zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt eine bestimmte Behauptung aufstellt oder aufgestellt hat. Ich kann immer noch fragen, wie ich etwas wüsste, wenn ich es wüsste.
I 263
StroudVsCavell: Bsp ich lese einen Kriminalroman, und stelle fest, dass ich – ohne eine Behauptung aufzustellen – vorausgesetzt habe, dass etwas bestimmtes unmöglich wäre. Und dass ich für diese Annahme gar keine verlässliche Basis habe, dass es doch möglich sein könnte, obwohl ich das nie explizit gesagt habe. Ich kann dann nachträglich die Position einschätzen (bewerten) in der ich war, und sie unzulänglich finden. ((s) Nach Cavell wäre das nicht möglich, weil er vorher eine explizite Behauptung verlangt, die den Kontext eindeutig festlegt.) Dennoch:
Stroud per Cavell: ich glaube er hat recht, dass der traditionelle Erkenntnistheoretiker für jeden konkreten Fall Äußerungsbedingungen braucht, die eine Verallgemeinerung unmöglich machen.
StroudVsCavell: ich möchte nur zeigen, dass man dazu gar nicht zeigen muss, dass gar keine Behauptung aufgestellt wurde.
StroudVsSkepticism: wenn es so aussieht, dass er seine Position einschätzen kann, sogar ohne dass eine bestimmte Behauptung aufgestellt wurde, müsste sich die Diagnose darauf konzentrieren zu zeigen, dass jede Einschätzung (Bewertung) seiner Position, die der Philosoph vornimmt, nicht die Bedeutung haben kann, von der er denkt, dass sie sie hat. Das ist der entscheidende Punkt.
I 264
Allgemeinheit: welche allgemeine Schlussfolgerung sucht der skeptische Philosoph und warum kann sie nicht gegeben werden? StroudVsCavell: es ist nicht hinreichend zu sagen, dass er eine allgemeine Folgerung sucht, denn es ist nicht wahr, dass die Untersuchung eines Einzelfalls keine allgemeine Folgerung über menschliches Wissen zulässt: Bsp ich lerne, dass Historiker etwas über Äpfel im Sizilien des 4. Jahrhunderts vor Christus wissen. Das zeigt, dass jemand Wissen über Sizilien hat und das ist eine allgemeine Aussage über menschliches Wissen.
Bsp dass niemand die Ursachen von Krebs kennt, ist ebenfalls eine solche allgemeine Aussage über Wissen.
VsMoore: wenn er keine allgemeine Aussage über menschliches Wissen zustande bringt, wie sie der traditionelle Erkenntnistheoretiker sucht, dann liegt das nicht an einer fehlenden Allgemeinheit! Sie wird in genau denselben allgemeinen Ausdrücken ausgedrückt wie sie der Philosoph gebrauchen würde.
Lösung/Stroud: wir müssen eine Unterscheidung von zwei Gebrauchsweisen derselben Wörter einführen. >Thompson Clarke: "Repräsentativität" (…+…)

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984
Correspondence Theory Moore Vs Correspondence Theory
 
Books on Amazon
Hacking I 179
MooreVs correspondence theory: an essential condition of the theory is that a true statement of the reality that in relation to which will include its truth, always deviates in a specific way when the reality again is not itself a sentence.   It is the inability to detect such a specific difference between a true statement and the supposedly matching reality which refutes the theory.

- - -
Horwich I 45
Korrespondenztheorie/CartwrightVsMoore: Problem: dann gibt es auch eine Eigenschaft des Übereinstimmens (Korrespondenz) die die falsche Proposition nicht hat. Und das scheint unleugbar von der Welt abzuhängen! Von einer Tatsache. Tatsache: die Proposition ist wahr, wenn es eine Tatsache ist, dass es U Bahnen in Boston gibt, sonst falsch.
CartwrightVsMoore/CartwrightVsRussell: es ist genau dies, was die Theorie der Wahrheit als einfacher, unanalysierbarer Eigenschaft ignoriert.
Aber dessen waren sich die beiden bewusst. („Meinongs Theory“ , S 75).
Sie hielten daran fest wegen:
RussellVsKorrespondenztheorie, MooreVsKorrespondenztheorie.
I 46
Wahrheit/Moore: ( Baldwin Dictionary, früh)): manche glauben, sie bestehe in einer Relation einer Proposition zur Realität. („Korrespondenz“). MooreVsKorrespondenztheorie: setzt voraus, dass sich die Wahrheit von der Realität unterscheidet (um überhaupt eine Relation eingehen zu können). Aber eine solche Differenz ist überhaupt nicht zu finden!
Lösung/Moore:
Proposition/Moore/früh: These: ist nicht identisch mit dem Glauben, sondern das Glaubensobjekt. ((s) >Relationstheorie).
Wahrheit/Moore/früh: These: ist identisch mit der Realität. Sie unterscheidet sich nicht von ihr….+…

Hack I
I. Hacking
Einführung in die Philosophie der Naturwissenschaften Stuttgart 1996

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994
Descartes, R. Moore Vs Descartes, R.
 
Books on Amazon
Traum/MooreVsDescartes: wenn ich nicht weiß dass ich nicht träume, dann weiß ich auch nicht, dass ich gerade aufstehe.
StroudVsMoore: eben diese Konsequenz von Descartes führt gerade zum Skeptizismus. Ich verstehe nicht, wieso Moore sie akzeptiert.
I 121
MooreVsDescartes: das ist aber kein Problem, weil es "beide Richtungen abschneidet". Denn wenn ich weiß, dass ich aufstehe, weiß ich, dass ich nicht träume. Also: weil ich weiß, dass ich nicht träume, weiß ich, dass ich aufstehe! StroudVsMoore: daher glaubt er, dass sein Argument empirisch ist. Ich sehe aber nicht, wie das daraus folgt.
Der Skeptizismus kann natürlich das Gegenteil (Konverse) sagen. ((s) Wenn ich nicht weiß, dass ich nicht träume, weiß ich nicht, dass ob aufstehe oder träume, aufzustehen).
Stroud: das eine Argument ist so gut wie das andere.
Stroud: ist das gerechtfertigt?
Bsp Skeptiker: man weiß nicht, ob man aufsteht – das ist analog zum Argument Bsp DetektivVsAssistent, dass die Liste nicht vollständig ist.
StroudVsMoore: daraus kann man aber kein "Unentschieden" folgern. Das Argument ist nicht "in beiden Richtungen abgeschnitten". Er kann nicht sagen. Bsp "Weil ich weiß, dass der Butler der Täter war, weiß ich, dass die Liste vollständig ist". Der Assistent hat die Liste nicht geprüft.
StroudVsMoore/(s): Moore beruft sich immer nur auf Dinge auf der Liste.
StroudVsMoore: er müsste aber zeigen, dass er weiß, dass die Liste nicht unvollständig sein kann.
I 122
Er kann nicht einfach das Argument des Skeptikers so umdrehen, wie er das tut. ((s) Weil er eine distanzierte Position (externes Wissen) braucht, die der Skeptizismus einnimmt, nicht indem er etwas bestimmtes behauptet, sondern etwas allgemeines).
Pointe: natürlich kann sich der Detektiv geirrt haben und der Assistent hätte die Liste vollständig gecheckt haben. D.h. in der Behauptung des Detektivs gibt es nichts, das etwas impliziert, das unerfüllbar wäre. ((s) Die Position des Skeptizismus ist also nicht, die Unvollständigkeit der Liste oder eine fehlende Berechtigung der Liste zu zeigen.)
Erklärung: die "Liste" impliziert nicht, dass ein externer Standpunkt unmöglich wäre.).
Skeptizismus/Moore/Stroud: es gibt andere Stellen in seinem Werk, wo er sich auf den Skeptizismus zubewegt (+) er scheint niemals damit zufrieden gewesen zu sein. Er gesteht sogar die "logische Möglichkeit" zu, dass wenn seine gesamten Sinneseindrücke Traumbilder sein könnten, er nicht wissen würde, dass er nicht schläft.
I 123
Lösung/Moore: Erinnerung an unmittelbar Vorhergehendes. Skeptizismus/StroudVsMoore: er zeigt nicht, dass diese logische Möglichkeit nicht besteht.
Hume, D. Moore Vs Hume, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 104
Wissen/Existenzbeweis/Existenz/Hume/Stroud: zwei Prinzipien: 1. Niemand weiß von der Existenz von etwas, wenn er es nicht direkt wahrgenommen (apprehended, >Apprehension: ungeordnet) hat oder dass er weiß, dass etwas, was er direkt wahrgenommen hat, ein Zeichen der Existenz dieses Dings ist.
2. Niemand kann wissen, dass ein Ding ein Zeichen von etwas anderem ist, wenn er diese beiden Dinge (Ding und Zeichen) nicht
I 106
direkt wahrgenommen hat. (>Bekanntschaft). Moore: daraus folgt, dass man nicht von materiellen Dingen wissen kann, wenn sie nicht direkt wahrgenommen werden. Dazu brauchen wir Bewusstseinsakte, Sinnesdaten und direkt wahrgenommene Bilder.
StroudVsMoore: ich verstehe nicht, warum er das (MooreVsDescartes) akzeptiert. Ich verstehe auch nicht, wieso er die Konsequenzen der Sinnesdaten-Theorie übersieht.
MooreVsHume: die beiden Prinzipien sind falsch: Bsp ich weiß, dass dieser Stift existiert, aber wenn Humes Prinzipien wahr wären, könnte ich das nicht. Daher sind sie, eins oder beide, falsch.
Moore/Stroud: akzeptiert, dass wenn man von Humes Position ausgeht, dann folgt, dass er nicht weiß, dass da ein Stift ist.
StroudVsMoore: beide Argumente sind gültig. Und sie haben eine gemeinsame Prämisse. Für Moore läuft die Frage, welche Konklusion man akzeptieren sollte darauf hinaus, ob es sicherer ist, dass er weiß, dass dies ein Stift ist oder sicherer, dass Humes Prinzipien wahr sind.
I 107
MooreVsHume: Bsp Stift: ist sogar das stärkste Argument um zu beweisen, dass seine Prinzipien falsch sind.
Idealism Kant Vs Idealism
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 130
Def problematic idealism/Kant/Stroud: Thesis: that the world, which is independent from us, is unknowable. Or that the latter is dubious or not reliable as other things that we know. That makes everything problematic. (B 274) KantVsIdealism: misinterprets our actual situation in the world.
- - -
Stroud I 142
Knowledge/KantVsMoore: the knowledge of everyday life must be shown "well-earned". But this is a philosophical task, not e.g. the problem if we are to believe a witness in court or the scientist. "Scandal"/Kant/Stroud: does not imply that the scientist or the person in daily life accepts the world only because of faith.
Life/daily life/knowledge/Kant: Here knowledge does not have to be proved. It is complete and unproblematic.
Knowledge/understanding/KantVsIdealism: but in order to understand our knowledge, the idealism must be rejected.
Knowledge/How-is it-possible-question/Kant: if we think, "How’s that possible?", we are quickly turning to idealism.
I 143
KantVsScepticism: he, however, gets into a predicament if he is needs to generally explain how our knowledge of the world is possible.
I. Kant
I Günter Schulte Kant Einführung (Campus) Frankfurt 1994
Externe Quellen. ZEIT-Artikel 11/02 (Ludger Heidbrink über Rawls)
Volker Gerhard "Die Frucht der Freiheit" Plädoyer für die Stammzellforschung ZEIT 27.11.03
Intuitionism Stegmüller Vs Intuitionism
 
Books on Amazon
Stegmüller IV 187
Metaethical Fallacy/Intuitionism ethics/Stegmüller: andere Art von m. f.: beim Intuitionism: die Thesis, eine echte moralisch Erkenntnis könne es nicht geben ohne ein entsprechendes Erkenntnisobjekt. StegmüllerVsMoore/StegmüllerVsIntuitionism: das beruht auf der falschen Prämisse, dass "gut" im moralischen Sinne eine "nichtnatürliche" und nicht analysierbare Eigenschaft bezeichne.

Ca V
W. Stegmüller
Rudolf Carnap und der Wiener Kreis
In
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd I, , München 1987

St I
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd I Stuttgart 1989

St II
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 2 Stuttgart 1987

St III
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 3 Stuttgart 1987

St IV
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 4 Stuttgart 1989
Metaphysics Nagel Vs Metaphysics
 
Books on Amazon
I 126
Moore's Hands/NagelVsMoore: Moore commits a petitio principii by relying on the reality of his hands, because if there are no material objects, not even his hands exist, and he cannot help to clarify this.
III 105
Identity/Person/Personal Identity/Temporal/Objectivity/Subjectivity/Nagel: Problem: the search for the conditions that must be met to be able to attribute two temporally separate experience episodes to the same person. Attempted solution: Continuities of physical, mental, causal or emotional nature are considered.
Basic problem: even if an arbitrary number of conditions is satisfied, the question arises again whether we are still dealing with the same subject under these conditions!
(s) E.g. "Is it the same subject for which this causal continuity applies?" etc.).
Nagel: E.g. "Would this future experience indeed be my experience?"
III 106
Person/Identity/NagelVsMetaphysics: even assuming a metaphysical ego, the question arises again. If, on the other hand, temporal identity was given solely by that it is still my ego, it cannot be the individual whose persistence guarantees my personal identity.
Outside perspective: here, the problem seems not to exist anymore: people arise and pass in time and that is how they must be described!
Subjective Perspective: here, the question of identity appears to have a content that cannot be grasped from any external description.
III 107
You can inwardly ask about your identity by simply concentrating on your current experiences and determining the temporal extent of their subject. For the concept of the self is a psychological one. - - -
III 124
NagelVsMetaphysics/Problem: as soon as these things become part of the objective reality, the old problems arise again for them! It does not help us to enrich our image of the objective world by what the subjective perspective reveals to us, because the problem is not that anything has been omitted.
This also applies to the prophecy (brain research) that the mental phenomena as soon as we will have understood them systematically, will be counted among the physical phenomena.
NagelVsPhysicalism: we cannot solve these problems by incorporating everything in the objective (or even only the physical) world that is not already contained in it.
Perhaps distancing and transcendence does simply not lead to a better description of the world.

N I
Th. Nagel
Das letzte Wort Stuttgart 1999

N II
Th. Nagel
Was bedeutet das alles? Stuttgart 1990

N III
Th. Nagel
Die Grenzen der Objektivität Stuttgart 1991
Moore, G.E. Austin Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Hacking I 179
AustinVsMoore: there is an independent possibility to pick out facts: ostension. Then we put on allegations by combining referring expressions and names of properties and relations.
John L. Austin
I Austin Wahrheit in: Wahrheitstheorien Hrsg. Skirbekk, Frankfurt/M 1996
II Jörgen Husted "Austin" aus :Hügli (Hrsg) Philosophie im 20. Jahrhhundert, Reinbek 1993
III Austin: "Ein Plädoyer für Entschuldigungen" aus: Linguistik und Philosophie (Grewendorf/Meggle(Hg)) Frankfurt (Athenäum) 1974/1995
Moore, G.E. Ayer Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Horwich I 52
RussellVsPropositionsRussellVsRussell: (later, Logic and Knowledge, 1956, p. 223): I used to think there were some. But that would only be shadowy additional things to facts. CartwrightVsRussell: we still do not know what the objection against them is!".
I 53
Fact/AyerVsMoore: expresses himself unclearly when he says, "the fact does not exist". Properly, it should be: "There is no fact". ("There is"/Existing/"Being"). (Ayer, Russell and Moore, p. 210). CartwrightVsMoore: it still remains a poor argument: it cannot be concluded that because a false belief has no fact as an object it has no object at all.
What Moore meant becomes more clear in "Some Main Problems": the proposition "that lions exist" is definitely in the universe, if someone believes that, regardless of whether it is true or false. Because the expressions "that lions exist" and "the existence of lions" are names for that which is believed. (p. 260).
Cartwright: at first this looks like a mistake, but it’s not: because he seems to have accepted (together with Russell) that what is believed can be named with a verb ("verbal noun").
I 54
Then we seem to have a demonstration that there is no such thing as the proposition that E.g. there is no subway in Boston. Because if there were one, there would also have to be such a thing as the non-existence of a subway in Boston. And this cannot exist, because there is a subway in Boston. Cartwright: what is the basis of this argument, the assumption that what is believed may be referred to by a verb (verbal noun)?.
CartwrightVsMoore: the argument is not very convincing: Maybe the sentence E.g. "Brown believes that God exists" is synonymous with "Brown believes in the existence of God." But it does not follow that what Brown believes is the existence of God. ((s) The "object" (object of the belief) is on the one hand a sentence with "that", and on the other hand the actual existence). (FN 19).
The reason for this lies in Russell’s access to propositions:
(8) Brown is taller than Smith.
I 56
Fact/proposition/CartwrightVsMoore/CartwrightVsRussell: Problem: now it is just hard to see how a proposition can be anything but true! (FN 23). If in (8) Brown is linked to Smith the way it is said above, how can Brown be anything but taller than Smith?. Russell: E.g. the proposition "A is different from B". The components seem to be only A, B and difference. Nevertheless, they do not constitute the proposition when they are next to each other. The Proposition combines the parts in more ways than a mere list. (FN 24).
Cartwright: nevertheless, if the proposition links the parts like this, it cannot be wrong!.
Cartwright: if a proposition like (8) exists, then Brown is taller than Smith.
Russell: in "Principles" he was also aware that there is a difficulty, but as a solution he could only propose:
Russell: if a proposition is true, it has another quality apart from that which it shares with other propositions. (p. 49).
Cartwright: this additional quality should of course be the simple, unanalysable truth. But this appeal comes too late! Either the components are linked properly, then the proposition is invariably true, or they are not, then we have no proposition at all.
A.J.Ayer
I Ayer Wahrheit, aus "Wahrheitstheorien" Hrsg. Skirbekk Frankfurt/M 1996
II Hügli ()Hrsg.) Philosophie im 20. Jahrhundert, Reinbek 1993

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994
Moore, G.E. Carnap Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 186
Sprache/Existenzbehauptung/Carnap: die Wahl einer Sprache ist für Carnap eine praktische Frage der Konvention. CarnapVsMoore: die Art der Wahl kann aber nicht intern beantwortet werden, wie Moore das versuchte.
praktische Lösung: kann von theoretischen Erwägungen beeinflusst werden. Es kann um Fruchtbarkeit und Einfachheit gehen.
Dingsprache/Carnap: ist zwar effizient, aber damit wird sie zwar attraktiv, aber sie zeigt damit nicht irgendwelche Evidenz der Realität der Welt. (ESO, 208).

Ca I
R. Carnap
Die alte und die neue Logik
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996

Ca III
R. Carnap
Philosophie als logische Syntax
In
Philosophie im 20.Jahrhundert, Bd II, A. Hügli/P.Lübcke (Hg), Reinbek 1993

Ca IV
R. Carnap
Mein Weg in die Philosophie Stuttgart 1992

Ca VI
R. Carnap
Der Logische Aufbau der Welt Hamburg 1998

CA VII = PiS
R. Carnap
Sinn und Synonymität in natürlichen Sprachen
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Ca VIII (= PiS)
R. Carnap
Über einige Begriffe der Pragmatik
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982
Moore, G.E. Danto Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon:
Arthur Danto
I 92
Argument der offenen Frage/Intuitionismus/Moral/G..E. Moore: soll »ruft Freude hervor«: alles das wirklich sein, was „gut“ bedeutet? Nein: dann würde es heißen »ruft Freude hervorrufen Freude hervor« ? Und die Antwort darauf wäre absolut nichtssagend. Bekannt als das »Argument der offenen Frage«. Moore gebrauchte es, um zu zeigen das "gut" undefinierbar ist.
gut/Definierbarkeit/Moore: »Rot« ist eine Qualität oder Eigenschaft der Dinge selber, einfach wie gelb. Auf Grund unserer »Intuition« können wir sagen, ob etwas gut ist, genauso wie wir sagen können dass etwas gelb ist. Wir argumentieren nicht, und sei es auch indirekt, dass etwas gut oder schlecht sei, wir sehen einfach, dass es das ist!
I 108
DantoVsMoore: VsArgument der offenen Frage: wird stumpf, wenn wir von vollständigen Ausdrücken ausgehen – Bsp „guter Ehemann“.
I 95
DantoVsMoore: können wir uns überhaupt vorstellen, dass zwei Dinge genau gleich sein können, mit dem einzigen Unterschied, dass das eine gut ist und das andere nicht?
I 112
Wäre die Güte dann eine Art Duft? Könnte das Gute abwesend seien, ohne dass das Schlechte anwesend ist? Das zeigt, dass etwas verkehrt sein muss eine Idee, daß das Gute einfach und somit undefinierbar ist. Die beiden Dinge müssen sich noch irgendwie anders unterscheiden.
DantoVsMoore: sein Argument der offenen Frage wird stumpf, wenn wir von vollständigen (synkategorematischen?) Ausdrücken wie »guter Ehemann« statt vom Fragment »gut« allein ausgehen.I 108
DantoVsMoore: er geht moralische Fragen zu kognitiv an: die Frage, welche Dinge gut sind, hängt in seiner Sicht zu sehr davon ab, ob sie als solche erkannt werden.
I 119
Moore: scheint wohl das Gefühl gehabt zu haben, auf einen Punkt im Grundinventar der Welt selber gestoßen zu sein. Das der Begriff "gut" zu den Atomen der Realität selbst gehöre und das so das Verstehen, das Wissen, und die Welt die gleiche Architektur besitzen. DantoVsMoore: wenn sich das aber als Illusion herausstellt, versinken ganze Kontingente der Philosophie. Das verleiht dem Begriff »Definition« ein umso größeres Gewicht, Definitionen binden die Grundbegriffe nämlich in größere Zusammenhänge ein. Sie dürfen nicht verwundbar sein.

Dt VII
A. C. Danto
The Philosophical Disenfranchisement of Art (Columbia Classics in Philosophy) New York 2005
Moore, G.E. Nagel Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
I 126
NagelVsMoore: commits a petitio principii by appeals to the reality of his hands, because if there are no material objects, there is not even his hands, and he cannot help to clarify this question.

N I
Th. Nagel
Das letzte Wort Stuttgart 1999

N III
Th. Nagel
Die Grenzen der Objektivität Stuttgart 1991
Moore, G.E. Prior Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
I 21
Correspondence Theory/Prior: now we can handle the fact that truth and falsity are not only applied to propositions, but also to beliefs and assertions. Truth/Belief/Logical Form/Prior:
E.g. "X believes that there will be a nuclear war, and there will be one."
(X believes that) p and p. (Parenthesis!).
Falsity:
E.g. "X believes that there will be a nuclear war, but there not will be one."
((s) but = and.)
X believes that p and ~p.
Correspondence Theory: Aquinas' "adaequatio intellectus et rei" goes back to the Jewish Neo-Platonist Isaac Israeli from the 10th century.
Locus classicus of modernity:
Correspondence Theory/Moore: (Some main problems of philosophy)
I 22
Example: Suppose a friend falsely believed that he (Moore) went on holiday and says: Moore: We should say, of course, that if this belief is true, then I must have gone on holiday,
and vice versa (conversely):
we should say that if I went, this belief is true, of course.
Prior: so far it is Aristotelian.
Now Moore continues, however, and says:
Although its absence is a necessary and sufficient condition for the belief of his friend to be true, it cannot be what is meant by saying that the belief is true! Because:
Moore: if we say "the belief that I'm gone, is true", we mean that the belief has a specific property that it shares with other true beliefs.
But if we say: "I'm gone", we do not attribute a property to any proposition!
We only express a fact, and this fact could also exist if no one believed that!
Point/Moore: if no one believes it, the belief does not exist, and then this belief must be false, even if I'm away!
((s) then it must not be false, because nothing that does not exist must be anything or have any properties per se.)
PriorVsMoore: he is forced to say that, because he assumes that belief consists in a relation between this belief and a fact. A relation that is not definable, but "familiar".
((s)> "overarching general": if the belief itself consists in a relation between (itself) the belief and a fact, the belief occurs twice. Problem: if it should be defined by this relation. But neither Moore nor Prior say that here. Instead: separating of levels. Belief/Name of the Belief).
Moore: the "name of the belief" is to be: "The belief that I'm gone."
Name of the fact: "I'm gone."
Correspondence/Moore: relation between "the name of the belief and the name of the fact" is what he calls the correspondence.
PriorVsMoore: (he probably discarded it later anyway). this is doubtful in two respects:
1) The reason he indicates for the fact that his absence should be constitutive for the truth of the belief of his friend, is at the same time the reason to say that "the former [was] no sufficient and necessary condition for the latter".
2) But if we corrected this with a truly sufficient condition, this correction would also give us a definition.
I.e. the belief is true if
X believes that p and it is the case that p.
Correspondence would not be more, then. (Simply accordance with the facts).

Pri I
A. Prior
Objects of thought Oxford 1971

Pri II
Arthur N. Prior
Papers on Time and Tense 2nd Edition Oxford 2003
Moore, G.E. Russell Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon:
Bertrand Russell
Horwich I 44
True/Moore: (Baldwin's dictionary article): is ambiguous, depending on whether it is applied to believe ---
I 45
then Smith' and Brown's believes are different or propositions: E.g. Suppose, someone believes that there are no subways in Boston, then this is wrong, but the object of believe (= Proposition) exists in any case.
Truth/Moore: (early) is a simple, unanalysable property that simply does not have a false proposition.
---
I 64
Falsehood/Moore: definable in terms of truth. RussellVsMoore: both terms are unanalysable.

R I
B. Russell/A.N. Whitehead
Principia Mathematica Frankfurt 1986

R II
B. Russell
Das ABC der Relativitätstheorie Frankfurt 1989

R IV
B. Russell
Probleme der Philosophie Frankfurt 1967

R VI
B. Russell
Die Philosophie des logischen Atomismus
In
Eigennamen, U. Wolf (Hg), Frankfurt 1993

R VII
B. Russell
Wahrheit und Falschheit
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994
Moore, G.E. Searle Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon:
John R. Searle
III 191
SearleVsMoore: the existence of the outside world is a truth condition of the statement that I have two hands. Difference: between truth conditions and conditions of intelligibility .. There intelligibility conditions of discourse. They are essential to our way of thinking and our language. We cannot give them up, as the idea that the earth is flat. (> Conditions of understanding, understanding condition).
III 193
Similarly, the external realism is not a hypothesis, but a condition of the intelligibility of other theories. It creates a space of possibilities. Background/SearleVsMoore: we keep it for granted that his hands are in a certain relation to the rest of his body. You are not in a safe deposit box. We simply take this for granted.
III 195
The joke is that we keep a lot in our normal understanding for granted, but many of the conditions of our normal understanding cannot be conceived without substantial distortion as truth conditions of the utterance. These are the kinds of conditions that will help us to determine the truth conditions of our utterances. They themselves are not part of this truth conditions.
- - -
V 264
naturalistic fallacy/SearleVsMoore: the being may well be derived from the ought: a statement of commitment, > Brandom: entering and assigning of a definition.
1. Jones expressed, "I hereby promise you, Smith, to pay $ 5." Jones is obliged Jones has to...

S I
J. R. Searle
Die Wiederentdeckung des Geistes Frankfurt 1996

S II
J.R. Searle
Intentionalität Frankfurt 1991

S III
J. R. Searle
Die Konstruktion der gesellschaftlichen Wirklichkeit Hamburg 1997

S IV
J.R. Searle
Ausdruck und Bedeutung Frankfurt 1982

S V
J. R. Searle
Sprechakte Frankfurt 1983
Moore, G.E. Strawson Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
IV 45
Philosophy/Moore: most important task, description of the whole universe, whereby it must be distinguished between what things we know that they have to be in it, and of which we do not know. ---
IV 48
StrawsonVsMoore: with the word "important" we will not get far. It boils down to the question of the most common things and most general terms. ((s) things cannot be general, there are always terms of which generality is claimed.)

Str I
P.F. Strawson
Einzelding und logisches Subjekt Stuttgart 1972

Str IV
P.F. Strawson
Analyse und Metaphysik München 1994

Str V
P.F. Strawson
Die Grenzen des Sinns Frankfurt 1981
Moore, G.E. Wittgenstein Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
VI 212
"On Certainty"/Wittgenstein/Schulte: the book goes back to the confrontation with the remark Moore's "I know that I have two hands" or: "This is a material object" and others. E.g. Moore: "The earth has long existed before I was born". (> "Moore's hands")
WittgensteinVsMoore: one can only say that this sentence has a clearer sense than "it exists in the last 5 minutes".
Wittgenstein: E.g. But why should a king have not been brought up to believe that the world started with him?
Knowledge/certainty/WittgensteinVsMoore/Schulte: Moore justifies knowledge by specifying contingent empirical propositions.
Wittgenstein (PU, BPP): we see in knowledge often the highest level of a hierarchy of attitudes to objects of knowledge.
---
VI 213
From this ranking, we too easily conclude that sentences that are fixed indubitable, are sentences at the same time, whose contents one knows. E.g. 1 + 1 = 2 can one really say, you "knew" things like this?
Thesis: if doubts are excluded, the use of the term "knowledge" is not appropriate.
E.g. I am simply in pain, has nothing to do with "knowing that".
---
VI 216
E.g. At maximum, after an accident I can reassure myself that I still have my hands. ---
VI 222
WittgensteinVsMoore/Schulte: E.g. "I never went far from the surface of the earth": it is difficult to classify the sentence into a context. Therefore, it is also not clear what one might call error here. Moore's sentences can hardly be assigned to a language game, a spokesperson cannot be fixed.
---
VI 233
Certainty/WittgensteinVsMoore/Schulte: sentences that exclude doubts and mistakes, stand on a dead track.

W II
L. Wittgenstein
Vorlesungen 1930-35 Frankfurt 1989

W III
L. Wittgenstein
Das Blaue Buch - Eine Philosophische Betrachtung Frankfurt 1984

W IV
L. Wittgenstein
Tractatus Logico Philosophicus Frankfurt/M 1960
Moore, G.E. Verschiedene Vs Moore, G.E. Grice I 266ff
Hungerland These Vs "induktive Auffassung" des Paradigmas der Kontext-Implikation: p behaupten, impliziere, zu glauben, daß p.
Hungerland: Stattdessen: These Erklärungs-Modell, wenn eine Behauptung normal ist, ist alles impliziert, was man daraus folgern darf.
Hängt von drei unterschiedlichen Dingen ab:
1.Kontext des Behauptens
2.Vorannahmen über das, was als normal gilt
3.Regeln für den richtigen Gebrauch von Ausdrücken
Bsp (Moore) "Er ist ausgegangen, aber ich glaube es nicht."
Hungerland: das ist kein Widerspruch! Kein logische Absonderheit in der Gemeinschaft.

Brendel I 14
Begriffsanalyse/Moore/Brendel: notwendige Bedingung: Synonymie der Begriffe. epistemologisches Kriterium/Synonymie/Moore: „Niemand kann wissen,
I 15
dass das Analysandum auf einen Gegenstand zutrifft ohne zu wissen, dass das Analysans auf ihn zutrifft. (Moore 1942, 663). Synonymie/Cooper LangfordVsMoore/Brendel: wenn die Begriffe dann synonym sind, (die Analyse also als korrekt angesehen wird) ist sie trivial. („Paradox der Analyse“).
Synonymie/KünneVsMoore: ist gar keine notwendige Bedingung für eine korrekte Begriffsanalyse.
I 16
Def Ko-Implikation/Künne/Brendel: Lösung: „Ko-Implikation“ = notwendige extensionale Gleichheit. (Künne 1990. 37). logische Form: „x ist A“ und „x ist BC“ implizieren sich wechselseitig in allen möglichen Welten (MöWe).
Problem. das ist selbst für kompetente Sprecher nicht immer ersichtlich.
Intensionsgleichheit/Brendel: Bedingung für sie ist notwendige Extensionsgleichheit: haben zwei Ausdrücke dieselbe Intension, dann haben sie in allen MöWe dieselbe Extension.
Intension/Extension/einige Autoren: das gilt aber nicht umgekehrt. Bsp Kirkham: „2+2=4“ und „36+7=29“ und Bsp „Dies Objekt hat eine Form“ und „Dies Objekt hat eine Größe“ sind zwar extensional äquivalent, indem sie in allen MöWe denselben WW haben, aber sie sind nicht intensional äquivalent (nicht synonym).
I 17
Begriffsanalyse/Kirkham/Brendel: manchmal geht es nur um Extensionsgleichheit in der WiWe. Extensionsgleichheit/Umfangsgleichheit/stärker/schwächer/Brendel: auch in allen MöWe ist sie immer noch etwas schwächeres als Synonymie.
- - -
Putnam I 195
BurnyeatVsMoore: "er philosophiert, als ob Kant nie existiert hätte". (a propos "Moore’s Hände").





Gri I
H. Paul Grice
Handlung, Kommunikation, Bedeutung, Hg. Georg Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1993

Bre I
E. Brendel
Wahrheit und Wissen Paderborn 1999

Pu I
H. Putnam
Von einem Realistischen Standpunkt Frankfurt 1993

Pu V
H. Putnam
Vernunft, Wahrheit und Geschichte Frankfurt 1990
Moore, G.E. Stroud Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Brendel I 267
Moores Hände/Brendel: Moore ist sich bewußt, dass sein Beispiel den Skeptiker nicht widerlegt. VsMoore/Brendel: sein Kritiker gehen jedoch von einem Wissensbegriff aus, den er selbst nicht teilt. Er gib zu, dass er die Prämissen seines Beweises nicht beweisen kann.
Wissen/Moore: Pointe: daraus folgt aber nicht, dass er nicht wissen kann, dass er zwei Hände hat! These: Wissen ist auch ohne Beweis möglich.
I 268
StroudVsMoore: Moore hat sich nicht wirklich auf die skeptische Hypothese eingelassen. Sein "Beweiß der Außenwelt" ist eine interne Reaktion. Das ist inadäquat. Skeptizismus/Stroud: These seine Frage kann nicht innerhalb eines bestimmten Wissenskontextes gestellt werden.
extern/intern/Skeptizismus/Moores Hände/Stroud/Brendel: zum zu zeigen, dass Moore recht hat müsste man zeigen, dass die skeptische Hypothese gar nicht extern formuliert werden kann.
Moores Hände/BrendelVsStroud: könnte man aber auch als durchaus externe Behauptung verstehen. Denn dass ein Subjekt etwas ohne Rechtfertigung wissen kann, ist typisch externalistisch (s.o.).
BrendelVsExternalismus: (s.o. 8.3.3).
I 270
Moores Hände/BrendelVsMoore/pro Stroud/Brendel. - - -
Stroud I 115
Wissen/Skeptizismus/Stroud: Bsp Frage: gab es 400 vor Christus Äpfel auf Sizilien? Ich weiß es nicht, aber ich habe eine Idee wie ich es herausfinde: neue Frage: ist es bekannt, ob es...? Dann könnte ich Historiker fragen. Einige werden sagen "Ich weiß..."
Wenn mich dann jemand fragt, kann ich sagen: "Ja, es ist bekannt, dass ..."
Das alles sind Fragen über Wissen, die ganz direkt beantwortet werden.
StroudVsMoore: das gleiche geht aber nicht, wenn man überhaupt nichts über die Welt weiß. Im Beispiel ist impliziert, dass man überhaupt etwas über Sizilien weiß ((s) dass man weiß, dass es überhaupt existiert Existenzannahmen sind schon impliziert, wenn Wissensfragen beantwortet werden).
Moore/Stroud: nimmt an, dass man solche Fragen nicht ernst zu nehmen braucht,
I 116
weil es ganz leicht ist, sie zu beantworten. Wissen/Stroud: es geht darum, dass es allgemeine Wahrheiten über menschliches Wissen gibt, die einfach aus der Tatsache folgen, dass überhaupt etwas gewusst wird.
Moore/Stroud: eine solche allgemeine Frage könnte also mit Hinweis auf ein bestimmtes Stück Wissen beantwortet werden. So scheint Moore es zu verstehen. Bsp die Geologie erklärt etwas über Gesteinsschichten, also gibt es materielle Dinge, Bsp es gibt neun Planeten, also gibt es mindestens neun materielle Dinge.

Strd I
B. Stroud
The Significance of philosophical scepticism Oxford 1984

Bre I
E. Brendel
Wahrheit und Wissen Paderborn 1999
Moore, G.E. Cartwright Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Horwich I 45
Correspondence theory/CartwrightVsmoore: Problem: there is also a property of coincidence (correspondence) which does not have the false proposition. And that seems to depend undeniably on the world! On a fact. Fact: the proposition is true if it is a fact that there are subways in Boston, otherwise it is false. CartwrightVsMoore/CartwrightVsRussell: it is precisely this which the theory of truth ignores as a simple, unanalysable property. But both were aware of this. ("Meinong Theory", p 75). They stuck to it, because: RussellVsCorrespondence theory, MooreVsCorrespondence theory.
I 47
Fact/True proposition/Moore/Cartwright: (Moore: Some Main P, pp 262): seems to have explained his former theory wrongly there: Tact/MooreVsMoore: (late): does not consist in a proposition having a simple property while remaining the same, regardless of whether it is true or false. Even if we concede the existence of propositions. The relation of the proposition to the fact is not simply that the proposition is a constituent of the fact, one of the elements of which it is composed. Moore/Cartwright: otherwise, one would have to say that E.g. the fact that lions exist was a fact about the proposition that lions exist. But how is this relevant for Moore’s earlier theory? Because that was not what it was about, but rather that the fact that lions exist simply is the proposition. (Moore, early: fact = true proposition, not part of it) The simple property (truth) is possessed by the proposition itself.
I 48
Anyone who believes that the proposition that lions exist is true, believes the corresponding proposition. The fact here is that the proposition is true. Fact/Moore: (early): consists in that the proposition possesses the simple property of truth. Fact/Moore/late: (Some Main P, misrepresenting his earlier theory): now consists in the possession of the truth (simple property) by the proposition. Important argument: then there is no identity fact = true proposition: because identity does not consist in itself having a property. ((s) A does not consist of the fact that A has the property F,> consist in, consist of, identity). Moore/Cartwright: the time of "Some Main .." he had come to the view that the relation theory of beliefs (acceptance of belief objects) is inconsistent with the identification of facts with true propositions. Now a relation was searched rather than the identity and his solution was the relation of "consisting in": Def Fact/Moore: (Some Main Problems): consists in the possession of truth by the proposition. (still simple property). CartwrightVsMoore: he saw himself that this was not very successful: there are facts that do not consist in a proposition having a certain simple property.
CartwrightVsMoore: worse: once facts and propositions are distinguished, no simple property (truth) is needed anymore. Instead, we now have facts as the corresponding ones! It was precisely this inability to distinguish propositions and facts that had led Moore and Russell to the theory of truth as a simple unanalysable property!.
Fact/Proposition/Moore/Cartwright: what had led Moore to start believing that propositions and facts cannot be identified?.
I 49
E.g. Suppose Brown believes that there are subways in Boston. Moore/Russell/early: then there is a corresponding proposition that Brown believes.
Problem: even if the belief had been wrong, Brown would have needed a faith object. Because what someone believes cannot depend on its truth!.
So the believed proposition is definitely in the universe. But if the proposition is false, there is no corresponding fact in the universe. So propositions cannot be identical with facts. Ayer: this is a compelling argument. Cartwright: but for me it does not refute the early theory!. Russell/Moore/Early/Cartwright: sure, if something is true of a proposition, and it is not true of the corresponding fact, then proposition and fact are not the identical. But is this case given here? According to the early theory, the proposition would be in the universe anyway, even if it were wrong. Question: Is Moore right to say that the same does not apply to the fact? CartwrightVsMoore: it is not obvious that if the belief, e.g. that there are underground trains in Boston, was wrong, it would be necessary that something that actually exists in the universe, (namely that there are underground trains in Boston) would then be missing in the universe. Surely it would not be fact, but that does not mean that an entity would be missing if the belief had been wrong.
I 50
Analogy: e.g. there is someone in the universe who can be correctly described as the author of Word and Object (namely Quine). Now, it could easily have been the case that Quine had not written the book. But that would not require Quine (= author of W + O) to not exist in the universe! E.g. Someone else might also have written the book. Furthermore, all persons who actually are in the universe, would not have had to be in the universe. Moore/Early/Cartwright: According to Moore’s earlier theory one might have thought that by analogy, something could also be in the universe that is "correctly described" with that there are underground trains in Boston, which, in the case that there were no underground trains in Boston, would not be a fact. That is wrong because of the false analogy between people and abstract belief objects). CartwrightVsMoore: (early): a follower of the early theory would have expressed the true same proposition with the following two sentences: (3) The fact that there are underground trains in Boston would not have had to be the fact that there are underground trains in Boston. and
(4) The author of Word and Object would not have had to be the author of Word and Object. CartwrightVsMoore: (early): With that he would have assumed that "the fact that" would have been a rigid designator.

Car I
N. Cartwright
How the laws of physics lie Oxford New York 1983

Hor I
P. Horwich (Ed.)
Theories of Truth Aldershot 1994
Moore, G.E. Malcolm Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 87
Wissen/Skeptizismus/Kompatibilität/Moores Hände/Stroud: wie kann der Skeptizismus misinterpretiert werden, wenn es um die Kompatibilität mit unserem Alltagsverstand geht? Zwei Möglichkeiten:
I 88
Existenzbeweis/Außenwelt/Moores Hände/Norman MalcolmVsMoore: (Malcolm: Moore on Ordinary Language, (in Schilpp Phil.of Moore, New York 1952, S. 348ff „S“): bleibt die Antwort VsSkepticism schuldig. Moore sagt nicht, was an den Zweifeln des Skeptikers an der Existenz seiner Hände falsch ist. Es wäre zwecklos für Moore zu sagen Bsp "Ich weiß, dass da ein Baum ist, weil ich eine klare Sicht auf ihn habe". Aber genau das scheint Moore zu tun.

Malc I
N. Malcom
Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein (Harper Essays in Philosophy) 1971
Moore, G.E. Verificationism Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 180
VerificationismVsMoore/Stroud: der Verificationism geht viel tiefer als Moore, weil er die Notwendigkeit einer Begründung in einer positiven Philosophie anerkennt. Wir müssen leere Illusionen aus unserer intellektuellen Karte tilgen können. Positiver Ansatz/Carnap/Stroud: damit bietet er das an, was er für eine korrekte Beschreibung unserer alltäglichen Position in Bezug auf die Außenwelt hält, und in Bezug auf die Frage, wie ist’s möglich, dass wir etwas wissen.
Moore, G.E. Newen Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
New I131
Metaethics/Newen: to clarify, what the status ethical statements is - not what kind of ethics is the right one. Moore: is utilitarian. Moore pro utilitarianism.
Good/Moore/Newen: 1) Thesis: you never make a purely empirical assertion by saying that something is good.
2) good is not a natural property, i.e. it is a non-natural one.
3) For that, we need moral intuition.
Def Right Action/Moore/Newen:
I 132
The one that brings forth more good than any alternative action. "Right": can therefore be further analyzed.
Naturalistic Fallacy/Moore/Newen: the wrong intention to define values ​​properties empirically. This confuses two worlds. The natural and the non-natural.
Good/Moore: since the substitution in "What we all want, we want all" by "What we all want is good" is not trivial, "good" cannot mean the same as "what we all want."
I 133
NewenVsMoore: this does not mean that "good" is a non-analyzable and non-empirical property. Paradox of Analysis/Moore/Newen: (solution see above I 15) a concept relation necessarily applies and it is informative if it is not part of the normal language competence, but can only recognized through systematic study of conceptual relations. This option applies - as for all expressions - also for "good".
I 133/134
Good/Moore/StevensonVsMoore/Newen: Suppose Moore had shown that "good" is not a natural property. It does not follow that it is a non-natural property. It would require that "good" is a describable property at all. Although Moore is right that such statements are not empirical ones, it does not follow that they are non-empirical.
Value/Values​/Stevenson: Thesis: Value ​​statements are no assertions that are true or false, they do not express opinions and beliefs, but they serve to evoke attitudes. This thesis was called emotivism.

New I
Albert Newen
Analytische Philosophie zur Einführung Hamburg 2005
Moore, G.E. Stegmüller Vs Moore, G.E.
 
Books on Amazon
Stegmüller IV 181
Argument der offenen Frage/gut/Definition/Moore: Angenommen, jemand behaupte, "gut" könne man definieren als "der Lebensfreude förderlich". Dann könnten wir trotzdem immer noch die Frage verstehen: "zugegeben, es fördert die Lebensfreude, aber ist es auch gut?".
Fazit: "gut" muss eine einfache, nichtanalysierbare, nichtnatürliche Qualität bedeuten.
StegmüllerVsMoore: das kann sich nur auf das sittliche Gutsein beziehen.
IV 182
Wir könnten immer noch vermuten, dass es in moralischen und nichtmoralischen Kontexten einen gemeinsamen Bedeutungskern gibt.

Ca V
W. Stegmüller
Rudolf Carnap und der Wiener Kreis
In
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd I, , München 1987

St IV
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 4 Stuttgart 1989
Putnam, H. Hacking Vs Putnam, H.
 
Books on Amazon
I40
Truth/Reason/Putnam: are very closely connected. HackingVsPutnam.
I 148
Meaning/Science/HackingVsPutnam: we should talk about types of objects, not about types of meaning. Meaning is not a very good concept for philosophy of science.
I 156
HackingVsPutnam: Reference is ultimately not decisive! (E.g. muon). For physicists, "Meson" was initially synonymous with "whatever corresponds to the presumption of Yukawa". That’s something like Fregean sense. When it became clear that this sense did not correspond to the object, the baptism was annulled and a new name was given.
I 163
PutnamVsMetaphysical Realism: Vs idea of ​​"fixed whole of mind-independent objects". HackingVsPutnam: nobody has never represented this!.
I 164
HackingVsPutnam: links his different theses, as if they were logically connected. They are not!. HackingVsPutnam: he used to represent a scientific realism. He has not changed party, he has changed war.
I 179
HackingVsPutnam: however, actually he has shown nothing but the failure of the reference by naming a number of true statements, which are brought into being in the first-order logic (>Löwenheim, >AustinVsMoore).
I 181
Löwenheim-Skolem/Premises/Hacking: 1) the sentence is only about the first-order logic sentences. So far, no one has proved that the language of the physicists could be pressed in this context. Spoken languages ​​contain indicators: "this" and "that". Montague thesis: colloquial language primarily uses second-order quantifiers. Wittgenstein’s arguments against showing, according to which it was not possible to fully specify meaning using rules, do not imply that there was something in our linguistic practice, which is essential undetermined. Löwenheim and Skolem spoke about large numbers and we can only talk about them. About cats or cherries we can do more than merely talk. Putnam asserts that it is possible to reinterpret words such as "designate" and "refer" in turn. HackingVsPutnam: I do not need theory of reference to refer. And it’s a - possibly with reference to Wittgenstein - at least defensible conception that there cannot be a general theory of reference.
I 182
scientific articles on muons are full of photographs! - E.g. muons: it has been found that the mass of the muon is 206,786 times the mass of the electron. How have we found out this figure at the time?.
I 183
From a whole bunch of complicated calculations with a bunch of variables and a number of relations between nature constants. These consist not only of sentences, but are linked to experimental findings. They also have been found by independent scientists and laboratories.
I 184
The Löwenheim-Skolem theorem is not constructive. I.e. in principle there is no method for producing a non-intended interpretation available to man. - E.g. we also speak of "Persian" and "Heart Cherry". These species names do not act like ordinary adjectives of the type "sweet", because sweet heart cherries are sweet fruits and not "heart fruit". - Solution: This is not possible or would be noticed, because the number of subspecies is not the same: the number of cherry species is different from the number of cat species. So no correspondence relation will preserve the structure of the species names. Moreover, you would not bake a cake with cats! How should cherry facts come to light in the cat world?.
I 185
Putnam perhaps commits the gravest error possible in philosophy: he takes a sentence as an example that was perhaps never uttered and would be pointless outside logic. The next step is then to assert that just as it is possible to reinterpret "cherries" it is possible to reinterpret "designating". Reference: its warranty does not depend primarily on the expression of true propositions, but on our interactions with the world. Even at the level of the language there is far more structure given than Putnam involves.
I 220
HackingVsPutnam: transcendental Nominalist (anti-realist). It is not possible to step out of the system of thought and retain a base of reference that does not belong to one’s own system of reference. HackingVsPutnam: misguided dichotomy of thought and action (like Dewey). Hacking Thesis: man is a representing being. (A tribe without images is not a human tribe for me).

Hack I
I. Hacking
Einführung in die Philosophie der Naturwissenschaften Stuttgart 1996
Skepticism Kant Vs Skepticism
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 129
Skepticism/knowledge/KantVsDescartes: The relation between the philosophical question and our everyday or scientific knowledge is more indirect and complex than he thought. ((s) (see below): But for Kant the perception of external things is very direct). Descartes/Stroud: for him the skepticism is inevitable!
Kant: would agree. That is why he developed another concept.
"Scandal"/Kant: that a theory has never been developed in the history of philosophy that avoids skepticism.
Knowledge/theory/Kant/Stroud: there are conditions to be met by any theory of knowledge: the theory must not be deny that there are external things. Suppose there were no external world, then Descartes’ skepticism would loose its sting! Then there would be no limit to my knowledge that I know nothing about the things except me, because there would be nothing after all.
I 130
Def problematic idealism/Kant/Stroud: Thesis: that the world which is independent from us is unknowable. Or that the world is dubious or not reliable as other things that we know. That makes everything problematic. (B 274) KantVsIdealism: misinterprets our actual situation in the world.
Knowledge/Kant/Stroud: whoever reads the proof, must know at the end that the example is a goldfinch or actually three typographical errors.
Stroud: these are not really high standards. It seems that every access to knowledge needs to meet this standard.
Problem: virtually no philosophical theory satisfies this condition!
KantVsDescartes: (end of the 1. Meditation) does not meet this condition.
KantVsSkepticism: therefore, any inferential approach must be avoided to avoid it.
World/reality/Kant: the external things which we know need to have a "reality"((s) a particular property?) which does not allow to be inferred . (A 371). ((s) Kant here similar to Hume: direct perception of things)).
immediate perception/= Awareness/Kant/Stroud: there is then a sufficient proof of the things’ (of this kind)reality! ((s)> proof of existence). (A 371).
Stroud: so that we are in a daily situation where the (Kant), "external perception [provides] ... the direct evidence of something real in space". (A 375).
DescartesVsKant: could say that Kant is actually not capable.
Stroud: But this is not a matter which one of both gives the correct description of the situation.
KantVsDescartes: its description cannot be correct. But he is not just giving a competing alternative. He rather gives conditions for the access to knowledge.
I 132
At least such theories must take account of the traditional skepticism. E.g. if Descartes was right, we could not know anything about the outside world. That is the reason why Kant does not allow to infer knowledge of external things. Otherwise, skepticism is inevitable.
Stroud: So it requires precisely the kind of knowledge that Moore gives!
I 140
Def "Epistemic Priority"/terminology/Stroud: you could call Descartes’ thesis that sensory experience, perception, representations (which Descartes calls Ideas’) are epistemically placed before the perceived objects.
I 141
Stroud: that means that epistemically subordinated things cannot be known without epistemically antecedent things being known. And not the other way around. That means that the latter are less knowable, so the outer world is less knowable than our sensory experiences. KantVsDescartes/KantVsEpistemic priority: this view needs to be rejected since it cannot explain how knowledge is actually possible!
Perception/KantVsDescartes: we perceive things directly, without conclusion.
Stroud: we understand Kant only when we understand Descartes.
Realism/KantVsSkepticism/KantVsDescartes: these considerations which involve him are those which lead to the epistemic priority (priority of sensations (or "ideas") before the objects).
I 142
We need to understand this in order to understand Kant’s version of realism. (VsMoores simple realism). That means the realism which explains how it is possible that we know something of the world? (Conditions of the possibility of knowledge).
I 146
Knowledge/KantVsSkeptizismus/Stroud: when external perception (experience) is the condition for inner experience, and when external experience is immediate then we can know (in general) that there is an external reality which corresponds to our sensory experiences (sensations).
I 147
Then there may be deception in individual cases, but no general skeptical questioning. KantVsSkeptizismus/KantVsDescartes: cannot be extended to all, it can only appear in individual cases.
Perception/KantVsDescartes: N.B. if one could assume the skepticism at any rate, one would have to assume that our perception has come about not directly but indirectly, inferentially (via conclusion).
KantVsDescartes: this does not go far enough and relies too heavily on the "testimonies" of our everyday expressions.
I 148
Descartes should have examined the conditions that actually make experience possible. KantVsSkepticism: even the "inner experience" of Descartes are possible only if he firstly has outer experiences. Therefore, the skeptical conclusion violates the conditions of experience in general. Descartes position itself is impossible:
no examination of our knowledge could show that we always perceive something other than the independent objects, which we believe exist around us.
Skepticism/Kant/Stroud: Kant accepts at least the conditional force ((s)e.g. the premises) of the traditional skepticism.
KantVsDescates: But he rejects the skeptical conclusion: they contradict every adequate philosophical theory of knowledge.
Solution/Kant: what we know touches the phenomena.
KantVsSkepticism/Stroud: The antecedent of the skeptical conclusion can only be true if the consequent is false.
Knowledge/world/KantVsMoore/Stroud: Thus, he has a different understanding of the relationship between philosophical study of knowledge and the knowledge in daily life.
I 159
Science/reality/everyday/knowledge/KantVsDescartes/Stroud: our everyday and scientific knowledge is invulnerable to skepticism. KantVsMoore: But there is no conclusion of our perceptions of knowledge about unrelated things.
- - -
I 168
Knowledge/explanation/StroudVsKant: But we could not need an explanation: not because skepticism were true (and therefore there would be nothing that could be explained), but because the general philosophical question cannot be provided conclusively! (> Carnap, S.U.). Kant/Stroud: Important argument: advocates in a manner for a limited ("deflationary") perspective, which corresponds to this criticism. ((s) "deflationary": here: not directed at the most comprehensive framework).
KantVsDescartes: when his question could be provided coherently, skepticism would be the only answer. Therefore, the question is illegitimate.
StroudVsKant: this does then not explain what Descartes was concerned about.
I. Kant
I Günter Schulte Kant Einführung (Campus) Frankfurt 1994
Externe Quellen. ZEIT-Artikel 11/02 (Ludger Heidbrink über Rawls)
Volker Gerhard "Die Frucht der Freiheit" Plädoyer für die Stammzellforschung ZEIT 27.11.03
Skepticism Cavell Vs Skepticism
 
Books on Amazon
I 52/53
Skeptizismus/Cavell: Asymmetrie: du nimmst an, daß dein Unvermögen ((s) den Schmerz vorzuführen) gleichsam die gleiche Bedeutung hat wie das des Skeptikers: er müßte in der Lage sein zu zeigen, was er vor Augen hat, wenn es denn verständlich ist. Sonst nimmst du an, der Skeptiker könne nicht zeigen, daß seine Position verständlich ist.
Für den Skeptiker gibt es allerdings eine andere Asymmetrie: er muß die Verständlichkeit seines Unvermögens nicht nachweisen.
Der Kritiker des Skeptizismus muß also zeigen, daß auch der Skeptiker keine Verwendung für seine Worte hat.
Bsp Solange man nicht zeigen kann, daß es möglich ist, durch die Gegenstände hindurchzusehen, ist es sinnlos (unverständlich) von der Unfähigkeit des Durchsehens zu sprechen.
Warum kann der Skeptiker nicht einfach sagen: "Du verstehst nicht, was ich meine".
I 54
Die Quelle der Verständlichkeit sind die Worte selbst dann kann man sagen: VsSkepticism: er benutzt die Worte in einem Fall. wo sie nicht mehr sinnvoll sind.
SkepticismVsVs: das ist zweischneidig: der Einwand zeigt, daß der Skeptiker den Kontext wechselt, das zeigt aber auch, daß das, was der Skeptiker sagt, verständlich ist!
- - -
Stroud I 256
Skeptizismus/Cavell/Stroud: (Cavell, The Claim von Reason, Wittgenstein Skepticism, Morality and Tragedy (Oxf. 1979, "CR", S. 45ff) wir müssen den Unterschied festhalten zwischen der skeptizistischen Behauptung, dass wir niemals etwas wissen und der alltäglichen Feststellung, dass wir in Einzelfällen etwas nicht wissen. Stroud: Frage: wie kann die philosophische Frage nach der allgemeinen Möglichkeit von Wissen überhaupt entstehen, während wir es mit der Einschätzung (Bewertung) eines Einzelfalls zu tun haben?
I 257
Cavell: ist das Beispiel, das der Skeptiker hervorbringt, als ein Beispiel für einen Einzelfall zu verstehen? Descartes/Stroud: wir nehmen sie eher als ganz alltägliche Fragen. Bsp ich weiß nicht, ob ich wirklich am Kamin sitze mit einem Stück Papier in der Hand.
Basis/Terminologie/CavellVs: Thesis: im Fall von Descartes ist die Basis nicht völlig natürlich eingeführt. Das ist der Schlüssel zur Diagnose.
CavellVsSkepticism: Thesis: "Der Skeptiker tut nicht, was er zu tun glaubt". D.h. aber nicht, dass er die Bedeutungen der verwendeten Begriffe verzerrt. ((s.o. AustinVsMoore).
I 258
Pointe: hier geht es gerade darum, dass die Weise, etwas zu sagen, wesentlich dafür ist, was gemeint ist (Cavell, The Claim von Reason, Oxf. 1979, 208) Gebrauchstheorie/Cavell: geht von Einzelsituationen aus.
Use TheoryVsEpistemology/Stroud: dies ist ein besonderer Zweig der Kritik am Skeptizismus.
CavellVsSkepticism: es ist nicht so, dass er die Dinge nicht meinen kann, die er zu meinen glaubt, weil seine Konklusion widersprüchlich wäre. Vielmehr ignoriert er überhaupt die Bedingungen seiner skeptischen Behauptungen, während seine Wörter die ganz normale Bedeutung behalten. ((s) Kein Bedeutungswandel).

Cav I
St. Cavell
Die Unheimlichkeit des Gewöhnlichen Frankfurt 2002
Various Authors Cresswell Vs Various Authors
 
Books on Amazon
II 58
Computation/Cresswell: (representative: e.g. Moore/Hendrix, 1981) make it appear as if they have solved a problem which logicians have tried in vain to solve for years. CresswellVs: these are two completely different issues: ((s) The logicians are more concerned with the semantic one, the computation people with psychological issues). Content/Cresswell: (of a complement sentence) can be considered to be an equivalence class of all objects that are considered representations of this sentence. Belief objects/Moore/Hendrix (Hendrix 1981) some of these objects (the objects of mental states such as beliefs) are sentences in an internal language of the mind, others are in public language. There may be some that are in no language at all. (E.g. logical formulas).
---
II 59
Content/Meaning/Cresswell: two sentences have the same meaning when they have the same content, providing they contain no index words. (5) The map indicates that the distance to Lower Moutere is 12 km.
... This requires each sentence to already have a meaning, so that the attitude is simply an attitude with regard to the meaning.
CresswellVsMoore/CresswellVsHendrix: i.e. we can only solve the problem of Moore and Hendrix if we already have a semantics.
Synonymy/Cresswell: if the synonymy relation ~~ (notation: in the book two swung dashes on top of each other) is defined like that, it can be set up compositionally for the whole language. I have no idea how this is supposed to work, but Hendrix and Moore refrain from it anyway. CresswellVsHendrix: they do not show how the synonymy classes are obtained.
---
HC I 260
Non-standard systems/Hughes/Cresswell: have other basic operators as L and M. E.g. Halldén (1949b): limitation to a single three-digit operator which defines all other modal and truth-functional operators: [p, q, r] with the meaning that "either p is false or q is false or r is impossible" , i.e. (~p v ~q v ~Mr).
Then: negation, conjunction, possibility:
~a = def [a,a,a]
(a . b) = def [a,b[a, ~a,a]]
Ma = def ~[[a, ~a,a],[a ~a,a],a]
---
I 261
Hughes/CresswellVsHalldén: that makes an unnatural impression.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984

The author or concept searched is found in the following 2 theses of the more related field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Sketpicism Cavell, St.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 257
Def -žBasis-œ/Terminologie/Cavell/Stroud: ist ein Satz, der einen speziellen Anspruch vorbringt Basis/Terminologie/CavellVs: These im Fall von Descartes ist die Basis nicht völlig natürlich eingeführt. Das ist der Schlüssel zur Diagnose.
CavellVsSkeptizismus: These -žder Skeptiker tut nicht, was er zu tun glaubt-œ. D.h. aber nicht, daß er die Bedeutungen der verwendeten Begriffe verzerrt. ((s.o. AustinVsMoore).
I 258 Pointe: hier geht es gerade darum, daß die Weise, etwas zu sagen, wesentlich dafür ist, was gemeint ist (CR, 208)
I 258 Gebrauchstheorie/Cavell: These geht von Einzelsituationen aus.
I 258f Skeptizismus/CavellVsSkeptizismus: der Skeptiker tut nicht, was er zu tun glaubt -" er sagt nichts! -" dann kann er auch nichts meinen -" traditionelle Erkenntnistheorie: sagt erstaunlich wenig -" behauptet kein Wissen! - Def Basis/Cavell: ein Satz, der einen speziellen Anspruch hervorbringt -" CavellVsDescartes: hat auch keine Behauptung gemacht -" Unterschied: sich vorzustellen, am Kamin zu sitzen, und sich vorzustellen zu behaupten, dieses zu wissen -" so kann die Lösungsmethode nicht einmal unseren alltäglichen Methoden ähnlich sehen -" Behauptung: erfordert Kontext, der nicht allgemein zu übertragen wäre -" das skeptische Urteil wäre nicht repräsentativ -" I 261 das Urteil des Erkenntnistheoretikers oder Skeptikers ist stets partikular -" I 261 StroudVsCavell: ich kann feststellen, daß ich eine Voraussetzung gemacht habe, die nicht erfüllt ist -" dann stellt das mein Wissen in Frage, ohne daß ich das vorher in einem Wissensanspruch (-žBasis-œ) vorgebracht habe -" dennoch: wie Cavell: StroudVsErkenntnistheorie: braucht jedesmal einen konkreten Wissensanspruch, der eine allgemeine Beantwortung unmöglich macht -
I 263
Stroud pro Cavell: ich glaube er hat recht, These daß der traditionelle Erkenntnistheoretiker für jeden konkreten Fall Ã"ußerungsbedingungen braucht, die eine Verallgemeinerung unmöglich machen. StroudVsCavell: ich möchte nur zeigen, daß man dazu gar nicht zeigen muß, daß gar keine Behauptung aufgestellt wurde.
Skepticism Descartes, R.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 11
Descartes: These die Sinne zeigen uns nicht mit Sicherheit, ob die Situation in der wir uns zu befinden glauben, tatsächlich vorliegt. Das zeigt, dass wir überhaupt nichts über die Außenwelt wissen können. Descartes: These ich kann Wachheit nicht von Traum unterscheiden.
I 18
Descartes/Traum/Skeptizismus/Stroud: These beide Schritte von Descartes- Überlegungen sind korrekt. Dennoch: StroudVsDescartes: These wir können manchmal wissen, daß wir nicht träumen.
I 19
StroudVsDescartes: These man kann auch etwas über die Welt wissen, wenn man träumt (s.u.).
I 24
schwächere These/ StroudVsDescartes: die unleugbare Wahrheit ist bloß, daß wenn man träumt, daß einem dann Wissen fehlt. ((s) das ist also eine schwächere These). Skeptizismus/Stroud: These wird nur mit der stärkeren These erreicht!
I 111
Skeptizismus/Descartes/Stroud/VsMoore: Descartes gelangt zu seiner These durch eine Einschätzung all unseres Wissens. Quelle: waren bei ihm die Sinne.
I 140
-žalles anders-œ/Skeptizismus/Descartes/Stroud: erreicht seine skeptische Konklusion aus der These, daß unsere Wahrnehmung genau so sein könnte, wie sie ist, auch wenn es gar keine äußeren Dinge gäbe. Lücke/DB/Stroud: für Descartes gibt es einen Lücke zwischen Erscheinung und Realität.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 2 theses of an allied field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Skepticism Ambrose, A.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 89
Skeptizismus/Ambrose/Malcolm/Stroud: beide: Skeptizismus kann nicht empirisch widerlegt werden - Ambrose These: der Skeptizismus kann nicht einmal beschreiben, welche Art Ding ein Beweis für ein "Ding der Außenwelt" wäre - daher kann "niemand weiß, ob Dinge existieren" nicht falsifiziert werden. AmbrosVsSkeptizismus: Der Skeptizismus kann nicht anders als sich der Dinge über die er spricht, bewusst zu sein.
I 91
Bsp Wenn er sagt "Ich weiß, dass ich drei Doller in der Tasche habe" spricht er über etwas mögliches. - ((s) Wenn er es für unmöglich hielte, wäre er nicht Skeptiker). - Er gibt zu, dass es nicht notwendig eine Falschheit ist, die Sprache so zu gebrauchen. AmbroseVsMoore: kann daher nicht zeigen, dass der Skeptiker die Sprache falsch gebraucht. - VsMoore: argumentiert, als ob der Satz -"niemand weiß, ob Hände existieren" eine notwendige Wahrheit wäre.
Skepticism Malcolm, N.
 
Books on Amazon
Stroud I 89
Skeptizismus/Ambrose/Malcolm/Stroud: beide: Sk kann nicht empirisch widerlegt werden - Ambrose These: der Sk kann nicht einmal beschreiben, welche Art Ding ein Beweis für ein "Ding der Außenwelt" wäre - daher kann "niemand weiß, ob Dinge existieren" nicht falsifiziert werden - AmbrosVsSkeptizismus: der Sk kann nicht anders als sich der Dinge über die er spricht, bewußt zu sein - I 91 Bsp wenn er sagt "Ich weiß, daß ich drei Doller in der Tasche habe" spricht er über etwas mögliches! - ((s) wenn er es für unmöglich hielte , wäre er nicht Skeptiker) - er gibt zu, daß es nicht notwendig eine Falschheit ist, die Sprache so zu gebrauchen - AmbroseVsMoore: kann daher nicht zeigen, daß der Sk die Sprache falsch gebraucht - VsMoore: argumentiert, als ob der Satz -žniemand weiß ob Hände existieren-œ eine notwendige Wahrheit wäre